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Find my iPad


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#1 Beel

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 05:16 AM

Okay due to the recent news re the hacking of iPhones etc I turned off find my iPad  ICloud.

Now I get a message in my email with the following.

 

With Find My iPhone disabled, this device can no longer be located, placed in Lost Mode, or remotely erased using icloud.com/find or the Find My iPhone iOS app. In addition, your Apple ID and password will no longer be required for someone to erase, reactivate, and use your iPad.

So to me this is a catch 22 situation..do I turn it back on or do I leave it off...??? I do not have an iPhone just an iPad and a MacBook Air.

 

Thanks for any ideas as this has me baffled.
 



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#2 smax013

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 06:41 AM

Okay due to the recent news re the hacking of iPhones etc I turned off find my iPad  ICloud.
Now I get a message in my email with the following.
 
With Find My iPhone disabled, this device can no longer be located, placed in Lost Mode, or remotely erased using icloud.com/find or the Find My iPhone iOS app. In addition, your Apple ID and password will no longer be required for someone to erase, reactivate, and use your iPad.
So to me this is a catch 22 situation..do I turn it back on or do I leave it off...??? I do not have an iPhone just an iPad and a MacBook Air.
 
Thanks for any ideas as this has me baffled.


Apple's "Activation Lock" (Apple's version of a "kill switch" that some politicians & law enforcement people have been clamoring for) is tried to the Find Your Phone service of iCloud. If you do not have Find Your Phone turned on for your iOS device (whether iPad,, iPhone, iPod Touch), then Activation Lock is not functional (it also requires iOS 7).

Now, if you don't care about Activation Lock, then it will not matter. It just means that if your iPad is stolen, then someone can easily wipe it and then re-sell the wiped iPad. Of course, if you turn off Find Your Phone for that iPad, then you also cannot find it.

If you want Find Your Phone activated on your iPad, then there are three things you can due to mitigate the possibility of the hack that was recently reported in Australia (we still don't know how the hack was accomplished, so it is hard to say how scared people should be of it…it could have been something very local that cannot be replicated on a broad scale, which would explain why it seemed to have only happen in Australia, or it could be something very broad but was only used by some local hackers to Australia).

1) Turn on and create a passcode for you iPad. Yes, it is a pain to have to constantly enter that passcode to use your iPad, but it will also mean that you will be able to get back into your iPad even if this "hack" were executed on your iPad. From everything that I have seen, anyone who already has a passcode created could get back into their iOS device. There was still the issue of how their access the person's iCloud account to lock the iPad in the first place (probably solved by changing the password on the iCloud account), but they at least could get back into their iPad.

I don't know if there is a similar thing you can do for a Mac. With that in mind, you could leave the Find Your Phone service turned off on your Mac. To be honest, from my perspective, it is debatable how useful the service will really be for a Mac. Any competent thief would know to not turn on a Mac will it is connected the Internet, which then effectively defeats the purpose of the Find Your Phone service. Even if you get a stupid thief (which is entirely possible…there are lot of them out there), there is no guarantee that the Mac will connect to a WiFi network (the default way to connect to the Internet for a MacBook Air). I would argue that if you are worried about it getting stolen, then 1) engage FileVault (i.e. encrypt the drive) & make sure you have good backups; 2) make sure you have good insurance and have the details of the Mac (i.e. serial number, etc) saved; and then 3) then worry about using Find Your Phone or even a third party service such Prey (https://preyproject.com).

2) Make sure you have a strong password for your iCloud account and don't use the same password at multiple "critical" sites. Frankly, this is something that is true of any "critical" website/web service that you use. FWIW, by "critical", I tend to mean sites that you would be extremely upset if your account was compromised and/or the account has valuable personal information. From my perspective, that is any financial related site (i.e. bank accounts, credit card accounts, brokerage accounts, retirement accounts, mortgage accounts, etc), any e-commerce/retail site that has your credit card stored on it, etc. For accounts you are less worried about, then this advice is less critical. For example, I am not really worried if my cbssports.com account were to be hacked as I only used to use it to comment on their forums many, many years ago and do not really use it anymore.

3) Turn on two-factor account verification for your AppleID associated with your iCloud account. While this likely will not make your account 100% hack proof (not sure I believe anything is 100% hack proof), it will make it MUCH harder to hack. Here is information if you want to do it:

http://support.apple.com/kb/ht5570

#3 Beel

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 07:09 AM

Thanks again Smax013, you are certainly up there with it! It all gets a bit beyond me at times and fast becoming spy versus spy if you follow my drift. I will try and fully comprehend your reply and see how I go. I have read at times when an Apple users changes there  ID or password or both they have trouble trying to get back into their device, but that's another story I guess. Anyway again many thanks for your help, it is as always appreciated.



#4 Grinler

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 11:52 AM

Also to clarify, iphones are not being hacked, rather iCloud is. If you change your iCloud password to a more difficult one that is not used elsewhere then you should be ok.

#5 Beel

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 01:55 AM

Thanks Grinler every bit of advice is good to get as I am way behind with all this new technology!






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