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Ten Things To Do To Linux Mint17 After Install


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 02:49 AM

I found this link a while ago, I have posted it in a thread but just in case people do not read that thread here it is.

 

Congratulations, you have installed a brand new Linux Mint 17, with the Mate desktop! What's best for you to do, first of all?

Note: this web page is only meant for Linux Mint 17 with the Mate desktop environment; the page for the Cinnamon desktop is here and the page for the Xfce desktop is here.

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/mint-mate-first



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#2 Winterland

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 11:31 AM

Hey there Nick. With regards to this post - which is mighty helpful, I might add - there is a page for Cinnamon and the Xfce desktop but I've discovered (thanks to you) the LXDE and that's most likely where I'm going to stay 'cause I am loving it.

 

Will these instructions work while I'm logged into my LXDE or should I log out / then log back in with my MATE and perform all these?

 

Just wondering.

 

Thanks again.

 

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#3 NickAu

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Posted 11 July 2014 - 06:37 PM

 

Will these instructions work while I'm logged into my LXDE

You still have mint just with a different skin type of  thing, Updating is still updating, Installing divers etc is still the same it just looks different now.

 

Did you know LXDE looks and feels the same regardless of distro it's installed on? A puppy Linux with LXDE will look and feel like Mint 17 with LXDE for the most part. Things like boot times and some software will vary, the general stuff is the same.


Edited by NickAu1, 11 July 2014 - 06:44 PM.


#4 Winterland

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:09 AM

You still have mint just with a different skin type of  thing, Updating is still updating, Installing divers etc is still the same it just looks different now.

 

Did you know LXDE looks and feels the same regardless of distro it's installed on? A puppy Linux with LXDE will look and feel like Mint 17 with LXDE for the most part. Things like boot times and some software will vary, the general stuff is the same.

 

 

I did not know that and was trying to explain to my wife what the difference is.

 

She still is a Windows -gal and will probably be for awhile, but she's getting interested in Linux and has already expressed interested in me, possibly, setting up her Laptop with a dual boot situation, which I told her I would be glad to do.

 

OK, well, I'm off to do some more tweaking and finish up the list of 10 things. This skin really has made my Mint experience turn the corner, and all for the better. I had to log into my Windows side yesterday to update and patch everything and when I did, I realized I hadn't been over to that side for almost a week.

 

With continued gratitude and much respect,

 

Winterland


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#5 heyyou325

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 07:59 AM

Great, now I've got another one I want to try before I do my final installs.  Makes it 3 more, after the 16 I've used.  I  really like the LXDE desktop, and like mint a lot so it should be good.  



#6 Winterland

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 09:33 AM

Hello there heyyou325, yeah, I gotta say, the LXDE really changed things up for me. My initial response to Mint was not overwheliming but now...now that stuff is getting updated and tweaked the way I want, I'm loving it.

 

There probably are ways to tweak where I started from, but everything in LXDE seems a little more intuituve to me and, by extension, easier.

 

Have fun with it.

 

Winterland

 

 


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#7 Al1000

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 11:03 AM

I found this link a while ago, I have posted it in a thread but just in case people do not read that thread here it is.








Congratulations, you have installed a brand new Linux Mint 17, with the Mate desktop! What's best for you to do, first of all?
Note: this web page is only meant for Linux Mint 17 with the Mate desktop environment; the page for the Cinnamon desktop is here and the page for the Xfce desktop is here.

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/mint-mate-first
This is good stuff. I found an easier but just as effective way to reduce swap usage, that doesn't involve installing leafpad, by combining the information in that article with the information in this one:

http://askubuntu.com/questions/103915/how-do-i-configure-swappiness

This should be an effective performance enhancement for computers that don't have much RAM.

For anyone who might find the information useful, this what I just did with Kubuntu 12.04 on my laptop which has 768MB of RAM

Open a terminal and type or paste:
cat /proc/sys/vm/swappiness
...to confirm the swappiness value - mine was 60.

To open the file that needs to be edited, with an editor, and permission to edit:
sudo pico /etc/sysctl.conf
Paste:
# Decrease swap usage to a reasonable level
vm.swappiness=15
# Improve cache management
vm.vfs_cache_pressure=50
..into the first page of the file so that it now reads as follows:

#
# /etc/sysctl.conf - Configuration file for setting system variables
# See /etc/sysctl.d/ for additional system variables
# See sysctl.conf (5) for information.
#

#kernel.domainname = example.com

# Uncomment the following to stop low-level messages on console
#kernel.printk = 3 4 1 3

##############################################################3
# Functions previously found in netbase
#

# Uncomment the next two lines to enable Spoof protection (reverse-path filter)
# Turn on Source Address Verification in all interfaces to
# prevent some spoofing attacks
#net.ipv4.conf.default.rp_filter=1
#net.ipv4.conf.all.rp_filter=1

# Uncomment the next line to enable TCP/IP SYN cookies
# See http://lwn.net/Articles/277146/
# Note: This may impact IPv6 TCP sessions too
#net.ipv4.tcp_syncookies=1

# Uncomment the next line to enable packet forwarding for IPv4
#net.ipv4.ip_forward=1

# Decrease swap usage to a reasonable level
vm.swappiness=15
# Improve cache management
vm.vfs_cache_pressure=50


^O (Ctrl + O) to Write Out
Return (to save)
^E (to exit)

Reboot computer and type the first command again, to confirm swappiness has changed to 15.

And thereafter the computer should be faster. :)

#8 heyyou325

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 12:40 PM

Too many things to read and get my outside stuff done too.  I'm not too worried about swap size, at least yet.  I am worried about doing anything in the terminal.  I can't find mint 17 already switched to LXDE desktop, I guess one of my next problems will be installing a new desktop.  I should have a new used, less than 2 year old gateway 500 gb 4 gb ram, 2.3 gh processor here a couple days ago.  I'm planning on following the  http://conservativeread.com/how-to-replace-windows-xp-with-linux-for-free/   that I found in rburkartjo's cheesemakers thread.  A couple others in there too.  

 

I gotta say, the LXDE really changed things up for me. My initial response to Mint wasnot overwheliming but now...now that stuff is getting updated and tweaked the way I want, I'm loving it.

That's how I feel about it in zorin 8 lite.  I have to get about 3 new systems for the new laptop, and I would like mint to be one of them.  Guess I'd better get mate and try to change.  Can you change cinnamon to LXDE?  Also, what would be the problem installing a 32 bit OS on a 64 bit system?  That way I could use the same disk on both of my linux computers.   I haven't read all the things on reducing the swap size.  I guess I don't understand why that is necessary.  Now I have 4 gb swab for all 3 OS s on this computer.  I'm not hurt yet for space, and don't intend to be.  Planning on making a home partition as there are directions somewhere for, and that will save me space too.   Well, wife caught me inside, gotta go do some more things.



#9 Al1000

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 04:31 PM

I haven't read all the things on reducing the swap size. I guess I don't understand why that is necessary.

The information I posted concerns reducing swap usage, not swap size. It isn't ''necessary,'' and I posted the information for people with computers that don't have a lot of RAM (which probably doesn't include you). The articles Nick and I posted explain it in more detail.

For those who are interested, here is some more information on reducing swap usage, with one poster arguing that doing so is not a good idea:

http://askubuntu.com/questions/184217/why-most-people-recommend-to-reduce-swappiness-to-10-20

(Personally I'll leave mine at 15 for now, and see how it goes)

Also, what would be the problem installing a 32 bit OS on a 64 bit system?

None whatsoever. :)

Edited by Al1000, 12 July 2014 - 04:34 PM.


#10 heyyou325

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:00 PM

Thanks for the clarification on swap usage instead of size.   That's one less thing I have to learn, thankfully.  And I read somewhere that all 64 bit did was use more ram.  Guess that would be swap here.  



#11 NickAu

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:33 PM

 

 Can you change cinnamon to LXDE?

Yes you can, LXDE is just a desktop Enviroment.

 

For people with Lots of ram .

 

 

Preload is an ‘Adaptive Read-ahead Damon’, which is the equivalent to Windows Vista’s Superfetch. Effectively what it does is speeds up application load time by monitoring the software that is loaded and used day to day, the software used most often, and cache them in memory. If you have a lot of memory, you will notice things will improve – for example, my work machine has 20gb of RAM, 7gb of it is used by caches and everything runs nice and smooth. If your computer needs the memory, space is made, so you will not lose out if you have the average 4-8gb. The difference is certainly measurable – from 20% to 60% improvement in startup times.

Using preload to Speed up Linux | Linux.com

#12 NickAu

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:31 PM

The information I posted concerns reducing swap usage, not swap size.

The Linux kernel provides a tweakable setting that controls how often the swap file is used, called swappiness
A swappiness setting of zero means that the disk will be avoided unless absolutely necessary (you run out of memory), while a swappiness setting of 100 means that programs will be swapped to disk almost instantly.
Ubuntu system comes with a default of 60, meaning that the swap file will be used fairly often if the memory usage is around half of my RAM. You can check your own system's swappiness value by running:
 cat /proc/sys/vm/swappiness
It should return a value of 60

As I have 8 GB of RAM, so I'd like to turn that down to 10 or 15. The swap file will then only be used when my RAM usage is around 80 or 90 percent. To change the system swappiness value, open /etc/sysctl.conf as root. Type this into terminal  gksu gedit /etc/sysctl.conf Then, change or add this line to the file: Then hit save, You need gedit.
vm.swappiness = 10

Reboot for the change to take effect
 
You can also change the value while your system is still running
sysctl vm.swappiness=10

(Personally I'll leave mine at 15 for now, and see how it goes)

I have mine set at 0. If you open it with gksu gedit /etc/sysctl.conf Just change the value and hit save, A reeboot is needed.
2zq7q87.png

Also, what would be the problem installing a 32 bit OS on a 64 bit system?

What's The Major Difference Between PAE and Non PAE ...


Edited by NickAu1, 13 July 2014 - 08:51 PM.


#13 cat1092

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:56 PM

 

 

 Also, what would be the problem installing a 32 bit OS on a 64 bit system? 

 

Unless one is performing very resource tasks, or running virtual machines, one won't see nor feel the difference. 

 

Plus on older computers that can only be upgraded to say 4GB RAM, even if there's a 64 bit CPU installed, chances are that the 32 bit Linux Mint will be more compatible, as in drivers & programs/apps. Some users will perform a 64 bit install on an 6 to 8 year old computer & actually have problems with it. 

 

Also, the Cinnamon edition is more beneficial on newer hardware (3 years or less), regardless of bit version. Like Windows 8, is designed to be installed on modern computers. Though it may run, it just won't look as good as on a newer computer & there may be other issues. 

 

Most all Linux distros recommends going with 32 bit, unless the need for 64 bit is there. 

 

 

 

Well, wife caught me inside, gotta go do some more things.

 

Oh, no...........must be a newlywed, or not long married. 

 

Yeah I was there myself.........25+ years ago. 

 

Cat


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#14 NickAu

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 09:04 PM

Unless you add LXDE, While the boot times will stay the same the user will notice their system is way faster.  As I said before I ran Linux Mint 1732 bit on a Intel core duo @ 1.8 GHZ with 1GB ram and it was a pig of a thing, After adding LXDE all I could say was Nice.



 

 

Some users will perform a 64 bit install on an 6 to 8 year old computer & actually have problems with it.

:smash:



#15 cat1092

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 11:31 PM

I really like LXDE, on my oldest computer, Linux Mint 13 is installed due to it's the latest LTS that supports non-PAE CPU's. That notebook has a 1.73GHz Pentium M & 2GB DDR RAM. 

 

Well one day I noticed there were options as to what desktop to boot into. Selected LXDE & am glad I did, boots & loads everything 2x faster! Needless to say, that's the desktop I use on that computer now. 

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 13 July 2014 - 11:31 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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