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Having issues installing PNY (Nvidia) GeForce GTX 650


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#1 Jineku

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 11:52 PM

So the other day I decided to treat myself to a new graphics card, with Wildstar coming out in a few days.  It started an epic pain in the ass adventure.

 

Let me start by saying, this is my first time installing a video card, or anything else for that matter into a computer.  Technically I installed an old PCI Network card in an old computer about 10 years ago but that is the extent of my experience until now.

 

Also, it may be worth noting I am currently running an AMD Radeon HD 6570 card.

Other system specs:  Intel Core I7 2600 @ 3.4GHz

IPISB-CU Motherboard

Corsair CX750M 750 Watt Modular power supply

8GB Ram

The actual computer was a box computer I got 2, maybe 2 and a half years ago, it is an HP Pavillion HPE.

 

I brought the PNY GeForce GTX 650 (2GB edition) home and threw it in the PC.  I knew how to do it, its pretty simple just pull out the old AMD card and stick in the new one.  Then I realized, it had this 6 pin power connector.  My original power supply did not have a plug for this, nor did it have two of the flat 4 pin plugs for the adapter the card came with.  I also noticed that the minimum req's on the PNY card said a 400 watt power supply, where my original one was only 300 watts.  Simple fix, buy a new stronger power supply right?  I wish.

 

The next day I went to Best Buy and picked up a Thermaltake 600 watt power supply.  I ripped out the old and threw in the new.  I made sure it was connected to everything it needed to be properly.  It had the 6 pin power connector for a PCI-E power slot.  I hooked it all up then went to power on my machine.  It turned on, everything inside was running as intended, but on my monitor, all I saw was the initial HP Boot up screen.  Its blue, it has the HP logo, and it says press ESC to enter the boot menu i believe.  It never moved past this point, where normally this screen came and went within a second, and ESC was unresponsive.  Basically it was frozen.  I tried and tried to get it to do anything further.  I tried putting the driver installation disc in the disc drive and waiting, but nothing happened.

 

I thought maybe it was an issue because I currently have AMD video drivers installed on my computer, but my friend who is a lot more knowledgeable on the subject than I am assured me it should still run before the drivers are installed, just not to its fullest potential.  At this point I was frustrated, so I gave up and decided to put my old AMD card back in, with the new power supply still hooked up.  the computer started up normally and runs perfectly fine.  I tried installing the driver disc again, but it just said no hardware was recognized and wouldnt install.  I also tried downloading the correct drivers software from the GeForce website, but when I ran the installation it told me the same thing.

 

My friend suggested that even though the minimum req's on the new card said it needed a 400 watt power supply, that maybe the 600 watt one wasnt strong enough either seeing as how the rest of the computer is drawing from it at the same time.

 

Today I took another trip to Best Buy, and exchanged the 600 watt Thermaltake power supply for a Corsair CX750M 750 Watt Modular power supply, thinking that if the power supply is the issue, there is no way this one wouldn't solve the problem.  I brought it home and hooked it all up.  Nothing changed.

 

So I am at the point now where I don't know what else to do.  the only thing I can imagine being the issue after all the research I have done is that the PNY GeForce GTX 650 is a dud, and was a bad card straight out of the box.  Is this a common issue?  Maybe because I am inexperienced I am missing something stupid and I'll be kicking myself when I figure it out, but I am posting here in desperate need of help!  If anyone has any ideas, please, please share them.  If I can't find a solution by noon tomorrow, I will be taking yet another trip to Best Buy, to exchange the card.  

 

 

PS.

In an unrelated note I was debating putting up a few extra dollars and exchanging it for the EVGA Nvidia GeForce 750 Ti, though I am not really sure if it is worth it.  From what I understand the card performance increases like 650<660<670 etc.  Is the 700 series actually any better or is it the 50/60/70 that is really important. I do not have the funds to get a 300$+ 660 760, or anything else.

 

Also was debating trying to get a better AMD card instead thinking that since I have AMD drivers(which I'm not a huge fan of the software that comes with them), the card may work until I can install the correct drivers for that specific card.  I dont know if it actually works that way or not though, it as just a theory.



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#2 Jineku

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 11:55 PM

Also may be worth noting that when switching to the 750 watt modular power supply, I definitely hooked it up right, because I am using the computer with it in there right now, I just put the AMD Radeon HD 6570 video card back in and once again, it is working normally.



#3 TsVk!

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 12:57 AM

It may pay to completely uninstall your older Radeon card before installing the new one, possible conflict

 

It may also pay to disable your onboard video card in the BIOS, another possible conflict.

 

:hello:



#4 Jineku

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 02:26 AM

I'm not sure how to uninstall the radeon card, and I don't think I have an onboard video card.  there are no DVI/VGA ports in the back of my computer other than the ones on my current card.  There are however, two things that look like ports, one of which even says DVI, but they have black plastic caps screwed into them that say do not remove.



#5 TsVk!

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 03:17 AM

Sounds like you don't have an on-board graphics chip. (which I have never seen before)

 

To uninstall your graphics driver;

 

Start Orb > right click computer > Manage > Device Manager > Display adapters > right click device > uninstall.

 

Then shut down the machine, install the new graphics card and reboot.

 

On reboot install the new card drivers.



#6 md92h

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 03:32 AM

You should update the BIOS of your motherboard. for installing any of the 600, 700 and the new 800 Nvidia series, you need to update your BIOS. here's what you should do:

1- put back the Radeon graphic and boot to windows

2- download the latest BIOS update for your motherboard from manufacturer's website

3- the file is probably zipped so unzip it and copy the file to a usb flash memory. remember to backup the content of the memory or just use an empty one

4- before restarting and updating the BIOS, it's better to uninstall the Radeon driver. to do that open Programs and Features from Control Panel. find AMD Catalyst or ATI Catalyst and uninstall it. that's the driver.

5- restart the PC and depends on the model it may display the key you have to press to enter BIOS update. or you can enter BIOS and find the option to update the BIOS. you have to attach the memory before entering BIOS update.

6- according to instructions update the BIOS.

7- shut down the PC and install the Nvidia card. turn it on and install the driver.

 

HOWEVER if these didn't work and you're still having an issue with booting up then you should check first motherboard, then PSU.

 

on difference between 750 ti and 650 based on my own personal experience i say 650 is better. also there are test on the internet that show there aren't many differences between the two. so if you consider the extra money you'll pay for 750 while you're not gonna gain more performance, it's wiser to stick with your current 650.



#7 TsVk!

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 03:38 AM

What would a BIOS update do?

 

The machine boots and shows graphics with the new card, it is Windows that fails.

 

edit: ok, I just re-read the OP post, seems like the machine is not passing POST rather than failing boot, good call. :thumbup2:


Edited by TsVk!, 29 May 2014 - 03:44 AM.


#8 Jineku

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 11:26 AM

ok im getting ready to try these two things, thank you for the instructions on uninstalling the old card, how exactly does one update BIOS?



#9 md92h

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 12:04 PM

@Jineku

what is the exact model of your PC's motherboard? when turning on in the post screen at bottom of the screen is anything written about pressing function keys?



#10 Jineku

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 01:50 PM

unfortuneately all I know is that it is a IPISB-CU, I am not sure how to find out more information on it



#11 TsVk!

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 03:31 PM

Ok, I'm sorry to say I've got a bit of bad news.

 

This mobo is not compatible with any GPU other than the one it came with. You're motherboard has only PCIe 2.0 expansion slots, whilst the video card you have is PCIe 3.0. This will not work.

 

So you'll probably have to hash out another $100 for a decent mobo... or take your new parts back.

 

Sorry about that. (I guess you can stop bashing your head against the wall now anyhow.)

 

TsVk!



#12 TsVk!

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 03:41 PM

Just search IPISB-CU on Google to see what I mean. Half of the top ten results are about problems installing graphics cards in these motherboards. Many people have tried and failed.

 

In theory you 'could' buy a PCIe 2.0 GPU and install that, but the possibility of it working better than your Radeon is pretty slim.



#13 Jineku

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 05:43 PM

sigh.

 

I can shell out the cash for a better motherboard, problem is, there is no way I am capable of installing that.  PCI card, sure, power supply, i was worried but I got it figured out.  Harddrive, I could do, disc drive I could do.  Motherboard? theres no chance I could figure that one out.  Kinda feeling SOL right now.



#14 TsVk!

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 06:16 PM

It's surprisingly easy... The other thing attached to the motherboard you have not mentioned is the RAM, which is simple. But installing the CPU may not be the easiest thing.

 

You would have to check that your RAM & CPU matches your new MOBO also. But not hard to do really.

 

Watch some youtube videos on it, that's how I learned the first time. This one is extremely detailed, very good.

 

I'm not saying you should actually do that, it's just something to consider.

 

...



#15 Jineku

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 11:35 PM

Thank you for all of the help, I really appreciate it.  I only have one question left.  If, or when rather, I buy a new motherboard, is there an easy way to make sure it is compatible with my case?  my friend just told me that I need to make sure that it mounts correctly in the case I have.  I have been told my processor is still pretty decent even though its a year or two old, just to reiterate, I have an intel core i7 2600 (3.4GHz) so I would assume it would be compatible with most motherboards so long as I dont buy an AMD specific one.  And worst case scenario, if the RAM isnt compatible, if I'm not mistaken, RAM is pretty cheap. 






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