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Converting Win XP/7 to Linux


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#1 davnel

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 06:31 AM

Warning: NOOB question follows -

 

I have recently installed Mint 16 KDE 64-bit on my ustawas XP machine (i7-920/24GB RAM). Seems to work. For years I have had my Windows computers set up in a certain way and need to translate that to Linux. SO,

 

OK, lemme throw sumthin out to the Linux Gurus here. I have a set of folders in my Windows 7 system that act as menus and contain shortcuts to other folders and programs. This is mostly because 7 doesn't allow more than one taskbar. I had XP set up with 4. For example, one folder is called "Tech Daily" and contains web shortcuts to many sites I read daily. It also contains shortcuts to data folders and some programs that apply.

 

Question: how do I reproduce this in Linux? I have already figured out how to mount and access my Windows data disk (D). It looks like I'm gonna hafta have a whole new set of shortcuts for Linux, since the syntax is totally different. Also, can I link the music or picture contents of D to the corresponding folders in my Linux Home folder? Or, do I have to delete the Linux/Home folders and replace them with hard links to directories on D?

 

I don't need direct answers, just a link or two to where to start studying. Prolly gonna be a loooooooooooong process.

Thanks


Edited by davnel, 27 May 2014 - 06:32 AM.


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#2 buddy215

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 07:15 AM

If I understand....I use Firefox Bookmarks. When mousing over Bookmarks I see the listings for News, Entertainment, Forums,

Computer info, etc. Then when mousing over those listings I get another list of links.

 

You can import pictures, videos, etc. into your home folder, desktop, etc. I think you have stated you figured out how to do that.

 

I use Tomboy Notes, too. Very useful and may serve your purposes, too.


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#3 davnel

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 07:30 AM

Thanks.

My intention is to use the NTFS data disk (D) as the source of my various data files, if possible. To do as you suggested implies copying the files entirely to the home directory - not an optimal solution because the main source is my Windows 7 system. I synchronize the data disk with the W7 system's data disk weekly. May have to go to a NAS type solution rather than local disks (expensive!).

 

Haven't looked into the bookmark idea yet. Thanks for that.

.



#4 jonuk76

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 08:57 AM

If I'm understanding correctly I think most of what you are asking is to do with the GUI rather than Linux itself.  I'm not wanting to split hairs but it's quite important to understand that Linux is the core of the operating system and it can have any number of different 'front ends' to it.  These can range from no GUI at all on a server, to minimalist GUI's like IceWM to full desktop environments like KDE.

 

KDE has ways of doing things which are different to say, Cinnamon or MATE or through a terminal command etc.  Rather than a general Linux guide I think where I'd start would be familiarising yourself with KDE at the KDE User Base.  In particular Dolphin File Manager and Konqueror (an alternative file manager and web browser) which I think may tie in with what you want to do with bookmarks/favourites, and Common Tasks which is a general KDE how to, worth reading.


Edited by jonuk76, 27 May 2014 - 09:01 AM.

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#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 09:30 AM

I am not sure if this is what you are looking for but I did this in Ubuntu and I am pretty sure you can do it in Mint.

 

In Mint browse to the Windows folder you would like to access. Right click and select Make Link. Then drag the link to your Desktop. Then you can drag files from Mint into the Linked folder.



#6 NickAu

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 05:39 PM

 

In Mint browse to the Windows folder you would like to access. Right click and select Make Link. Then drag the link to your Desktop.

I can do that in KDE. Also I can right click an icon and send it to desktop.

 

Now some Linux windows speak.

 

If for example you have 2 drives C and D. you OS resides on C drive and your music etc is on D drive, Now you set something Like Clementine ( Music Player) up it imports the play list yada yada and it works fine. When you reboot It wont work. Why. Because D drive is not mounted. This will apply to anything on D drive til its mounted. Only the drive with the os gets mounted at boot up unless you tell linux to mount it at boot up time.

 

 

KDE has ways of doing things which are different to say,

Yes but that also makes it easy.


Edited by NickAu1, 27 May 2014 - 05:41 PM.


#7 bmike1

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 03:01 PM

I believe that (simply put) if your Microsoft data is on it's own drive (partition) just mount that drive and the data will be available  to Linux.. If your data and operating system is on the same partition you can mount the drive and the data will still be available only more difficult to find. To make shortcuts to files: mount the drive, find the file(s) you want to link to, hilight it/them, right click on one of the hilighted items, select 'Make Link' (it may be 'create link' or 'shortcut' or something like that in your WM <window manager>), then drag the created shortcuts to where you want them. What you could do is make a shortcut to the folder of the individual picture/music/etc.

 

unfortunately if it is microsoft specific data it might not be available. MS Office Documents and other things like that can be read with Libre Office. just try to access it and if you can't ask around if there is a way.... or google for a way (terms: '<file extension>' and 'linux'>


Edited by bmike1, 03 June 2014 - 03:09 PM.

A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.


#8 wpgwpg

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 04:05 PM

 I'm no expert, but I've piddled a fair amount with Ubuntu and Mint, and just want to make you aware of the different file system Linux uses in case you haven't discovered it yet.  I've read that there're ways around this, but if you happen to install one of these in the same partition with Windows, you can't resize any of your partitions after that because it confuses the Grub loader that Linux replaces your boot up mechanism with.  So if you plan to do this, be sure to check into your options beforehand.  The only other thing you should be aware of is that there're still a few things that you can't find drivers for.  In my case a Canon Pixima IP1600 printer and an Inland PCIe card for USB 3.  

 

 I have to say I've been impressed with these two distros and keep them around on DVDs and flash drives for trouble shooting whenever I have a computer that doesn't want to boot. :thumbup2:  Linux has come a heck of a long way in recent years with a growing no. of enthusiastic supporters while MS continues to frustrate folks with the likes of that Metro/Modern UI in Windows 8.  :nono:

 

Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#9 bmike1

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 06:37 PM

hp printers just work. I have a multiuse and both the scanner and printer work with Linux. one of my favorite apps is gscan2pdf.


A/V Software? I don't need A/V software. I've run Linux since '98 w/o A/V software and have never had a virus. I never even had a firewall until '01 when I began to get routers with firewalls pre installed. With Linux if a vulnerability is detected a fix is quickly found and then upon your next update the vulnerability is patched.  If you must worry about viruses  on a Linux system only worry about them in the sense that you can infect a windows user. I recommend Linux Mint or, if you need a lighter weight operating system that fits on a cd, MX14 or AntiX.





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