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External Hard Drives


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Plumber

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 08:48 AM

I have a quick question.I have a drive that plugs into a USB port and plugs into a power outlet.I also have a drive that plugs into a USB port only.What is the difference and which is better to back-up all my stuff.



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#2 SpywareDoctor

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 10:06 AM

Most 2.5" drives (laptop drives) can get enough power from a single USB port to run.

 

Most larger 3.5" drives (desktop drives) require more power to get their platters up to speed.

 

Personally, I prefer smaller drives. SSDs especially simply because they have no moving parts.



#3 Plumber

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 10:48 AM

Thanx for the quick reply,I can't afford to lose any back-ups so was wondering which one would be safer to use.



#4 SpywareDoctor

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 11:01 AM

Safer? Hmmm... I suppose that would depend on the age, condition, make and model of the hard drives. When it comes to spinners, I would prefer a Western Digital Black with a 5 year warranty.



#5 Plumber

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 07:13 PM

Thank-you



#6 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 11:17 PM

If you are going to buy an external drive for storing important data, i would recommend a mechanical hard drive instead of solid sate drive. While a SSD offers higher read/write speed, recovering data from a electronically failed SSD is harder even for a professional data recovery company. On the other hand, it is relatively easy for a data recovery firm to replace the failed part of a hard drive and recovering data stored on the platters.

 

  http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/385498/avoid-ssds-for-important-files-says-data-recovery-firm



#7 SpywareDoctor

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 07:35 AM

Thank-you

 

You're welcome.



#8 smax013

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 11:50 AM

Thanx for the quick reply,I can't afford to lose any back-ups so was wondering which one would be safer to use.


The safest way to ensure your don't lose any backups is to have multiple backups as any drive can in theory fail at any time. The common suggestion is to employ the 3-2-1 backup rule:

3 different copies
2 different backup formats (i.e. one on local hard drive and one on local optical discs or maybe an online backup service)
1 backup at an offsite location

http://blog.trendmicro.com/trendlabs-security-intelligence/world-backup-day-the-3-2-1-rule/

If you do not want to go to that extreme, then at least two copies on two different external drives…and ideally one of those drives stored off-site (i.e. at a relatives house or a safe deposit box). Even if you don't store one off-site, then you are still much better than just one copy on one external drive. The odds of three drives (your original drive and the two backup drives) failing at the same time should be infinitesimally small except for your house burning down, but then that gets mitigated by storing one off-site.

FWIW, the storing offsite of a backup does then lead to a "bus-powered" drive (aka the 2.5" drive that only requires a USB port and no external power plug) being more ideal as it will be smaller and have less "stuff" (i.e. only a USB cord besides the drive, but no power cable) associated with it.

Edited by smax013, 27 May 2014 - 11:52 AM.


#9 mrgreennv

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 11:11 PM

question ! i have a computer with 2 eid hard drives, do not work-not formated! and a computer with a 284 gb hard drive. can i hook-up my laptop to the eid harddrive? and format or partion a eid drive?



#10 SpywareDoctor

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 09:22 AM

That would be "IDE" (Integrated Drive Electronics), and yes, you can use a SATA/IDE to USB adapter to connect an IDE or SATA hard drive to a computer's USB port. They usually run between $15 to $20 (USD) or so.



#11 wpgwpg

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 09:43 AM

 Personally I buy 3.5" USB 3 SATA hard drive enclosures, then put a 7200 RPM powered 3.5" hard drive in them.  That way I believe it maximizes both reliability and speed.  Speed because of USB 3 and 7200 RPM.  Reliability because you can get hard drives that're more reliable with a wider selection.  I've had the best results with Sabrent enclosures.  USB 3 can be flakey in some configurations, but the Sabrent enclosures have worked for me with both Dell and Inland USB 3.

 

 Good luck.


Everyone with a computer should back his system up to an external hard drive regularly.  :thumbsup:

#12 SpywareDoctor

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 09:57 AM

Yes, enclosures are another good option. They can increase the operating temperature of the drive somewhat and usually run a bit more money of course, but they do help protect the drive.






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