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how hot is too hot?


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#1 geohammer

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 01:12 PM

hello, i have been using my computer for sometime now with a lot of information and help from people on this site, it has recently came to my attention that my computer seems to be running to hot, we are talking heat up my room with two windows open hot, i use speed fan to monitor my temperatures i will attach a picture of my idle temperatures with this topic and later will post one when my pc is under heavy load e.g. heavy gaming (a note i should add is earlier today i took my cpu fan of to check the thermal paste, only to find my cpu virtualy stuck to my fan and the thermal paste very hard) i will also post a speecy link soon

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/vgyVc1keLX3vs6Ga5hw1aln

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#2 Roodo

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 02:56 PM

Looks like fan 1 has gone down.



#3 geohammer

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 03:06 PM

thankyou only just noticed this myself let me check bios to see if it says anything about the speed of fan1



#4 geohammer

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 03:20 PM

i have to be honest with you i may of messed my settings up while setting up speedfan...this may help
http://s1175.photobucket.com/user/geohammer/media/speedfansetup_zps44c83cfb.png.html



#5 Mistersprinkles

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 05:05 PM

I last used speed fan in 1973. If you're on Intel use CoreTemp.



#6 geohammer

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 05:13 PM

I last used speed fan in 1973. If you're on Intel use CoreTemp.

if you look at the speccy link you will see i am on amd



#7 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 07:03 PM

You said the screenshot you posted in #1 is at idling load. The temperatures are a little on the high side but not excessively so. The one to watch is CPU temperature. Most CPUs can take up to about 70 - 80C before undergoing thermal shutdown, you want to keep them cooler than that. I did notice from your Speccy report that you SATA HD is running at 37C. While this is inside what is considered the limiting temperature of 50C it is hotter than the average for a desktop.

 

While it would be most informative to see a similar temperatures screenshot after a period of heavy use, I am wondering if in fact some of your exhaust air is getting re-circulated back into your case. This could happen due to the position of the desktop and its surroundings. They are after all air-cooled devices, and the cooler the air going in, the cooler the contents. It would also explain your rather high HD temperature.

 

That the thermal paste between the heatsink  and the CPU had solidified is perfectly normal, which is why you have to clean the surfaces and renew the paste if you ever break the bond - the two 'solid' surfaces will never reform the bond.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#8 geohammer

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 08:30 PM

You said the screenshot you posted in #1 is at idling load. The temperatures are a little on the high side but not excessively so. The one to watch is CPU temperature. Most CPUs can take up to about 70 - 80C before undergoing thermal shutdown, you want to keep them cooler than that. I did notice from your Speccy report that you SATA HD is running at 37C. While this is inside what is considered the limiting temperature of 50C it is hotter than the average for a desktop.

 

While it would be most informative to see a similar temperatures screenshot after a period of heavy use, I am wondering if in fact some of your exhaust air is getting re-circulated back into your case. This could happen due to the position of the desktop and its surroundings. They are after all air-cooled devices, and the cooler the air going in, the cooler the contents. It would also explain your rather high HD temperature.

 

That the thermal paste between the heatsink  and the CPU had solidified is perfectly normal, which is why you have to clean the surfaces and renew the paste if you ever break the bond - the two 'solid' surfaces will never reform the bond.

 

Chris Cosgrove

thankyou for this great amount of information, firstly i will post a picture of screenshot of my temperatures after running a full benchmark on "Heaven Benchmark 4.0" at full settings that should show a good example, in answer to your comments about circulation of air flow, a couple of weeks back i had a idea to maybe help this situation, i took the side panel off that had a extra fan on, i have i think 7 fans total in my pc (3 on graphics card) i have since left this of thinking that it may help reduce the heat, and also thankyou for the information about thermal paste i have re-applied the paste now

after 260 seconds  on "Heaven Benchmark 4.0" 
http://s1175.photobucket.com/user/geohammer/media/tempheaven_zps1504b5e3.png.html
 



#9 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 05:04 PM

Interesting screen shot. I take it that the 5% or so CPU usage is merely the usage for Speedfan and that the temperatures shown represent very close to the steady state temperatures at full power. 59C is definitely warm, but you have at least 10C of headroom before you start to get into dangerous levels. I also note that your hard drive is running cooler ! ( 33C rather thatn the 37C in the Speccy report).

One of the problems of temperature ratings is that there are different measuring points, which produce different readings. If you look at a table of semi-conductor specs you will see a figure quoted for T (J) (Max) - that is T sub-script, sub-sub-script - and this is the maximum rated full power temperature for the junction, or the actual piece of silcon itself. Some CPUs read this figure. Others read the case temperature, which is always lower than the junction temperature. Whichever figure is given in the CPU specs, the manufacturers are saying that you exceed this figure at your own risk. It may not die on you immediately, but you are certainly reducing its service life by running at temperatures in excess of maximum ratings.

While in general all electronics prefer cooler to hotter, the figures you have shown here are all well within tolerance and I wouldn't worry unduly about them. Just make sure that there isn't an accumulation of dirt and dust inside - give it a gentle clean every two or three months - and you should be OK. You mentioned in your OP that you have the windows open in the summer and can still feel the heat. I suspect you have a power supply rated near 1kW. All this energy has to go somewhere!  About 1W is light coming off your screen and perhaps 10 - 30W is appearing as sound our of your speakers - the rest appears as heat ! No wonder you feel the heat in the summer - it's equivalent to having a one bar electric fire on.

Just on the side - there is no need to quote a complete reply in your posts. With very rare exceptions - usually because a Moderator takes objection to a particular post - all posts stay in the topic in the sequence in which they are posted. Use quotes for specific points or comments that you wish to highlight and discuss or answer.

Chris Cosgrove



#10 geohammer

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 06:37 PM

hi Chris,
thankyou again for the great amount of information, so i should be fine with there temperatures?, also any tips for my system or setting changes im always up for learning new stuff. about the temperature sources you was on about, yes i could understand some of the heat coming from my monitor, because i actually use a 37" plasma tv so that may be the main source, and i also use headsets so dont use any speakers most of the time, and also i am very sorry for the huge quote i did not know and will take it into account for future.
thankyou,

 

George 
 



#11 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 04:25 PM

Basically no. Your temperatures are within tolerance and a little regular house keeping will keep them so. As I said, clean the fans and heatsinks every two or three months or so. It's surprising how quickly dust, dirt and general muck can build up on them and it's like adding a layer of insulation to your heatsinks - which is not quite what you want !

 

The other thing that is critically important is that if you ever have occasion to detach a heat sink the mating faces must be cleaned and a thin smear of fresh thermal paste applied to one of the mating faces before you replace it.

 

Don't worry about the quote. There are two reasons for discouraging quoting complete posts - first, the quoted post is still there and will remain there; second, it uses up an unnecessary amount of page space. But don't let that stop you using quotes if it is to make a particular point. It can be like a picture - worth a thousand words.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#12 geohammer

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 05:11 PM

hi Chris, 

as i stated in earlier post i have recently took the heat sink off to check the thermal paste i then cleaned both spots and reapplied some fresh thermal paste, i could understand dust in my system and i will be sure to schedule a weekly check for that as i use my pc a lot of the time, again thankyou for explaining about the quotes i will bare that in mind, also i would like to say i am a student studying computers, have you go any tips for my system or anything i can do to improve it, or any pointers on anything i am doing wrong also i would very much appreciate it if someone was to explain how to setup speedfan on my machine as i believe i may have made some mistakes there.

thankyou all for you help it is much appreciated,

 

thanks,

George  



#13 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:30 PM

Don't get too carried away !

 

Checking for dust and so on every two or three months is more than adequate unless you are using your computer in a markedly dusty environment and that normally only occurs in some industrial settings.

 

I have used Speedfan, just out of curiosity, and got the impression that it doesn't need much in the way of setting up, but interpreting it was a different matter.

 

Chris Cosgrove






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