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Installing XP on a Vista laptop


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#1 SpeedyVTXP

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 08:21 PM

Hello,

 

This is an absolute mess.

 

I have an HP Pavilion dv6000 laptop, '07. Last year it crashed completely, and would not restart. There are no restore disks, as this computer was given to me. It was stored in the attic over the fall/winter.

 

I decided to see if I could get the thing working. I tried several things, including running Ubuntu off of a live USB, nothing worked.

 

I went ahead and installed XP from a disk I have from an old desktop. I have completely erased and formatted the C and D drives.

 

XP is installed, but I got an error during the installation: 0x80070428. Also, the audio system does not work (as an example, Win. Mv. Mkr. crashes because it has "determined that the computer does not contain the audio hardware necessary for it to work"), and when I try to install a program I get the message "the procedure entry point DecodePointer could not be located in the dynamic link library KERNEL32.dll"

 

Could someone help me get this computer usable, even if it is just a digital typewriter?

 

Thank you very much.



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#2 bludshot

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 10:57 PM

There is no point trying to fix the broken XP installation. The installation failed to complete properly given that you got that error during installation.

 

Install and format all over again and see if XP installs successfully this time.

 

You could also consider Linux Mint 17: http://linuxmint.com/  But I don't know if your cpu supports that.


Edited by bludshot, 17 May 2014 - 10:58 PM.


#3 SpeedyVTXP

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 10:58 PM

Thank you. This is the second time I got the error... how to do Linux?



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 05:34 PM

I have just completely re-written this post because I mis-read your OP !

 

If Bludshot's advice of doing an XP re-install doesn't work then you could try installing Linux on it. Basically if your computer can run Windows, it can run Linux. However, Linux is not a magic wand and if the hardware is faulty it won't fix it. The audio problem could be due to either software or hardware. If the audio hardware has died, there is probably very little you can do about it short of a new motherboard. If it's a driver problem, try the HP web-site for audio drivers for XP.

 

Linux is a completely different OS from Windows and for advice you could do worse than either look in the Linux section of BC, particularly Cheesemaker's bit of it, or, as a basic text, acquire a copy of either the Idiot's or Dummies guide to Linux. Both of these books are well written, are explicit about the assumptions they make about your knowledge base and contain a welcome element of humour.

 

Linux Mint, as suggested above, is only one of many flavours of Linux. It is the one I decided to experiment with but this wasn't the consequence of a long and considered period of thought - I happened to have a copy handy !

 

If you want to try Mint, or learn more about it, the web-site is :

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/

 

The software downloads as an .ISO file and you will need some application like ImageBurn to turn it into an installable disc.

 

Chris Cosgrove


Edited by Chris Cosgrove, 18 May 2014 - 05:35 PM.


#5 cat1092

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 12:16 PM

If there is no DVD burner, as many older computers weren't supplied with one, or just a reader, a 2GB or larger Flash drive can be used to create a Linux Mint (or other version) installer. This tool is simple to use & instructions are self explanatory. Plus no wasted DVD's.

 

http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/

 

One can allow the tool to download the OS (I haven't tried this) or it can be pointed to the ISO file to create the bootable Flash drive installer. This only takes a few minutes, less with a fast SSD. There is still the option to run in Live Mode, which will be useful in determining hardware issues, such as sound. Note that sometimes audio doesn't work in Live Mode, though usually it does. Be sure when rebooting, if the BIOS isn't set to boot from a Flash drive first, if present, to press the key that selects the bootable device repeatedly to ensure it boots.

 

It is important when installing Linux Mint or whatever version of Linux desired, to be connected to the Internet during the install process, so that any needed drivers may also be installed. After the install & updating, go into the Control Manager or Administration & choose the option to check for drivers, sometimes an optimized sound or video driver may be available. That was the case when installing Mint 17 on my MSI FX603-064US notebook, there was a recommended Nvidia driver package listed & pre-checked for install, rather than the Linux provided one. This did give better quality graphics, as it was a genuine Nvidia package for Linux. In my case, no reboot was required, though I did anyway.

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 19 May 2014 - 12:17 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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