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What do I need to protect my pc fully?


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#1 Xanoas

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 09:31 AM

Need some good programs.



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#2 cat1092

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 10:39 AM

Well first off, security begins with the user & their browsing/download preferences. All of the security written cannot protect the user against theirself, as some will allow items to be opened, even if the installed security prompts a warning not to, or the user has created a huge whitelist of things to ignore or to be considered "safe".

 

Also, it's good to deploy adblockers (such as Adblock Plus) on the browsers, Firefox/Google Chrome/Opera has these available in their extension repository. There is a 3rd party one for IE, but it doesn't work in "Enhanced Protected Mode". NoScript is a great Firefox extension, though it does take some time to get used to. One can permanently (reversible) allow a site, or can run each on a temporary basis as needed on less frequented sites. WOT (Web Of Trust) is also a good extension to use to see reputations of sites. Generally, those in Red will be shaded upon visiting, with a warning, though if one knows 100% that it is a safe site, the user can continue to it.

 

Torrent software, it's also inadvisable to use these, as this provides a computer to computer (P2P) connection, along with the content that one wants, many illegal, also comes along with all sorts of malware that can do many things other than simply infect a computer. Some of these provides a direct path to all of your data, including any financial transaction information, these are forwarded to the crook whom planted the malware.

 

Java, unless needed, remove it from the computer. If it's needed by an app, you'll be notified of such, I ditched it over a year ago w/out side effects. There are some sites where Java is needed, such as Intel Driver Update Utility or Nvidia Update, but those sites furnishes a temporary copy to proceed.

 

Keep all of your installed apps & Windows up to date, including Flash. Having up to date apps are just as important as having all Windows updates current, as new releases includes security & bug fixes, in addition to sometimes offering new features.

 

Now, as to good security apps. This isn't an all in one solution, as a security app (AV or IS) that runs good on one computer or OS may perform poorly on another. It also depends on whether you want free or paid. And regardless of free or paid, some will run good & some not. That's why the major vendors offers a 14 to 30 day Trial period, to test compatibility before purchase. All features may not be avialable in Trial versions, such as Rescue CD's.

 

Free:

AVG, Avira, Avast, Bitdefender. I've used all of these with success. Currently use AVG & Avast Free on two seldom used Windows installs.

 

Paid:

Avast, ESET NOD32 or Smart Security, Bitdefender, Emsisoft Anti Malware (all in one AV/AM). These are the ones that I have the best experience with & currently run all on one or more Windows installs.

 

Questionable:

Kaspersky Internet Security 2013/2014, McAfee Internet Security: I've had trouble with these on all of my computers that I've tried to run them on & refuse to retry again. KIS often is hard to uninstall, requiring to download a tool & boot into Safe Mode to remove.

 

Supplemental Anti Malware/Spyware Apps, these have Free & Premium versions. The difference being a Free scanner that catches things after the fact & a Premium that acts in realtime:

 

Malwarebytes (aka MBAM), SuperAntiSpyware. These may have to be removed to install some brands of security software, such as F-Secure & Trend Micro (there are likely others). I use the Premium of of SAS on my main computer, Premium of MBAM on all of my Windows installs,

 

Note that I didn't include MSE (Windows 7/Vista) & Windows Defender (installed by default on Windows 8 & above), because they're rated lower than commercial security, free or paid. Plus they're not 100% compatible with all computers.

 

This is a good start, maybe others will offer suggestions. I've only included the ones that works for me on one or more computers, there's others that I've tried on multiple computer that didn't pan out, so I didn't list them.

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 17 May 2014 - 09:33 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 walyons89

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 11:46 AM

Do you recommend having more than one security or malware/spyware apps?



#4 cat1092

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 12:05 PM

I recommend a AV or IS suite, plus MBAM & SuperAntiSpyware (have both as Pro versions on 2 Windows installs).

 

The reason for this is that no AV or IS suite (AV+Firewall in most cases, there are a few exceptions) can intercept every threat there is. MBAM & SuperAntiSpyware (SAS) often finds what traditional security solutions doesn't. I always run a short scan with SuperAntiSpyware (after updating) prior to shutdown, it takes less than a minute on a fast SSD, anywhere from 3 to 7 minutes on a HDD, depending on speed of the drive & interface (SATA or IDE). SATA drives are typically faster & the scan won't take as long. On older IDE drives, it may take longer than 7 minutes.

 

However, SAS does find many tracking & ad cookies, these can be quarantined after the scan & is well worth running. You can let it run while getting ready for bed, taking a shower, whatever, if it runs slow. It is beneficial, because over time, these ad & tracking cookies builds up & not only slows your computer, but can also be a threat to your security.

 

It's also good to perform a short or Hyper scan with MBAM daily & be sure in the Advanced settings that "Check for Rootkits" is checked. A Full or Threat scan is recommended at least once weekly. A reboot may be needed to completely remove any caught infections.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 walyons89

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 12:38 PM

Thanks, appreciate it.



#6 quietman7

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 09:33 PM


You may want to read these topics:
Choosing an Anti-Virus Program
Supplementing your Anti-Virus Program with Anti-Malware Tools
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#7 NickAu

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 09:39 PM

I am a big fan of sandboxie. Used Deep Freeze for a long time.

 

http://www.sandboxie.com/

 

 

Or Deepfreeze.

http://www.faronics.com/en-uk/products/deep-freeze/


Edited by NickAu1, 17 May 2014 - 09:41 PM.


#8 quietman7

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 09:44 PM

Another point I like to emphasis...no amount of security software is going to defend against today's sophisticated malware writers for those who do not practice safe computing and stay informed. It has been proven time and again that the user is a more substantial factor in security than the architecture of the operating system or installed protection software. Knowledge and the ability to use it is the best defensive tool anyone can have.
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#9 Didier Stevens

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 04:05 PM

Do you make regular backups?


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#10 cat1092

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 08:04 PM

Do you make regular backups?

That is one of the most overlooked items by many, if everyone created backups when initially purchasing a computer after updating, disk cleanup, defrag & virus/malware scan, but before adding any 3rd party software (other than MS Office & it's updates), many of the topics we see on tech forums would never have been brought up.

 

I backup my main computer 2x weekly, whether or not it needs it. My other two that my main backup computers, once weekly, even my 10 year old T42 ThinkPad gets a monthly backup. Plus I have official reinstall disk sets for all & recovery partitions are intact.

 

Excellent point that you make, Didier! We preach & preach & preach more, but too few listens. Going by most of the computers that I've personally worked on, it was me, at my suggestion, to assist these users to create recovery disk sets, otherwise they'd not exist. It would be my guess that less than 20% (& that's giving the benefit of the doubt) of Windows customers bothers with this task & about the same with backup. Nor does many store their data on a separate partition/drive than the Windows one.

 

I do assist a few select users with backup, but I cannot possibly do all of my relatives & friends computers, nor am I going to attempt it. It's their responsibility, I'll gladly advise on how to do it, what software & external drives are needed, but as performing them, it's their data & choice. Users whom truly values their data will backup. Those who don't, well one day they'll be out of luck. Hard drives & SSD's can fail at any given second, it's better to have the backup & never need it, rather than desperately need it & not have it.

 

The only bad backup is the one not taken. Most modern backup apps will check the integrity of the image after taken.

 

The good thing is, backup software doesn't have to cost a cent. There is Macrium Reflect & EaseUS Todo Free, I've used both with success many times.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 quietman7

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 04:14 AM

The widespread reports of ransomware has shown that the only reliable way to protect your data and limit the loss with this type of malware infection is user education and to have an effective backup strategy. A backup strategy is not only effective against ransomware but also helps with other catastrophic scenarios like hard disk failure which could also result in loss of data. Unfortunately, since many users do not have a backup strategy they are forced to pay the ransom demand in order to recover their data.
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