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free or paid or security suites ? (lil help please)


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#1 GreekEnigma

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 05:25 PM

Ok 1 im disabled so need easy to use software that can protect me (hopefully ill get better 1 day and learn about sandbox and all stuff)

 

anyway for ages when ever i get a pc or laptop etc ive always installed the following security stuff

 

firewall (juts left it alone as heard win7 firewall is ok,plus i like not having to mess with firewalls)

 

avast free antivirus

 

malwarebytes free (so just a demand scanner)

 

superantispyware free (again just a demand scanner)

 

spywareblaster (does somethhing to browsers lol)

 

ccleaner (i just delete whatever pops up :scratchhead: )

 

firefox addons

 

ABP (addblockplus, again i just install it and leave it be)

 

ghostly (again i dnt understand it so just install and leave it be)

 

now my question is, is this enough protection as im guessing theirs no active protection here? just on demand?

 

ummmm

 

also is it better to just buy a complete security suite (like bit defender etc) ???

 

im very out of techy stuff :(

 

but paranoid about privatcy and protection (which is horrable when you have brain issues DISABILITY)

 

i wish i could understand sanbox (whatever its called) as was told best protection or something called a vpn

 

also is the following true?

i Remember reading a while back that everyone should bin windows and install Linux mint (whatever that is?)

i was told if your non techy etc go for linux as it never ever gets virus or malware

if thats true i want to kick this win7 out the window

 

thanks all

maybe people should tell me what they use and recommend or something

 

 

 

 



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#2 quietman7

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 07:04 PM

avast anti-virus provides real-time protection. Malwarebytes, SuperAntiSpyware and Spywareblaster are three other tools I recommend. See Supplementing your Anti-Virus Program with Anti-Malware Tools.

Since you are not sure what Spywareblaster does...let me explain. It restricts the actions of potentially dangerous sites by adding a list of sites and domains associated with known spyware, advertisers and marketers to the browser's "Restricted Sites Zone". SpywareBlaster prevents the installation of ActiveX-based malware, browser hijackers, dialers, and other potentially unwanted software and blocks tracking cookies. SpywareBlaster also includes the ability to keep encrypted backup copies of the Hosts file so if its altered by malware infection, you can easily restore a good backup copy.

Unlike many other security tools, SpywareBlaster is not intrusive as it does not run in the background...it focuses on prevention and passive protection without utilizing unnecessary running processes or consuming system (CPU, memory) resources. The program only requires installation and then enabling of all protection. After that you only have to check periodically for database updates using the built-in "Check for Updates" feature and then enable all protection again. Since SpywareBlaster does not use a real-time protection module, it supplements your existing security software without causing any conflicts. SpywareBlaster can be used with Internet Explorer and many other popular browsers such as Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Netscape, Seamonkey, Flock and several more (see here).

How does SpywareBlaster actually work? It adds sites to the restricted zones by adding the domain as a subkey under the registry key: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings\ZoneMap\Domains. A dword is then added to that domain named * and given a hex value of 4 to specify that it is part of the Restricted Sites Zone. More specifically, Spywareblaster sets the "killbit" on the CLSID (Class ID) of known spyware. Every program has a CLSID that is unique to the type of program. Once Spywareblaster enables (writes) those killbits they are "locked in" and any identified spyware cannot be opened. Spywareblaster writes these killbits in and then stays off until you need to re-write them again with an update. Why is all this important? Some types of malware are known to alter Trusted Zones, Ranges and ProtocolDefaults set for a browser.
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#3 Johnny Computer

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 07:34 PM

Looks like Quietman beat me to the post....lol....but I'll post what I have anyway. :)
 

Ok 1 im disabled so need easy to use software that can protect me

 

but paranoid about privatcy and protection (which is horrable when you have brain issues DISABILITY)

 
 
Hello Greek Enigma and :welcome:   to Bleeping Computer .  I understand how brain issues can effect your ability to think and how they can effect decision making when it comes to computer security  I would be happy to offer you some advice in regards to the questions you are having.
 
Remember the most important things in computer security are:

  • Never use torrent sites
  • Always make sure all your programs, operating systems, anti virus software, drivers, etc are always patched and up to date.
  • Be very careful as to what you click on and what attachments you are opening
  • Do the best you can to make sure all websites you visit are legitimate

Who ever picks up the topic you posted in our malware removal forum will most likely give you additional information on how to keep your system clean after your computer has been cleaned.
 

firewall (juts left it alone as heard win7 firewall is ok,plus i like not having to mess with firewalls)

 
The Windows 7 firewall is sufficient in my opinion.  Comodo and Zone Alarm are two other popular free firewalls.  I f you choose to install a 3rd party firewall such as Comodo or Zone Alarm be sure to disable your Windows 7 firewall
 

avast free antivirus

 
This is a good and reliable free AV   :)
 

malwarebytes free (so just a demand scanner)
 
superantispyware free (again just a demand scanner)

 
Excellent choices.  Keep in mind that it is never a good idea to have more then one Anti Virus program installed at one time as that can cause false positives and other conflicts.  It is fine having  Mawarebytes, and Super Antispyware installed and using them as on demand scanners along side Avast.   :)
 

ccleaner (i just delete whatever pops up  :scratchhead: )

 
Bleeping Computer does not reccomend the use of registry cleaners.  An explanation as to why can be found in Animals post here:
 
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/373006/registry-cleaners/?p=2091100
 

firefox addons

 
These are also ok but again be careful to make sure that anything you add on is legitimate.  Often times when downloading software you will be propmpted to download additional programs or add ons that may not be the best things to have on your system.
 

ABP (addblockplus, again i just install it and leave it be)

 
This is ok also :)
 

ghostly (again i dnt understand it so just install and leave it be)

 
I am not familiar with "Ghostly".  Are you maybe refering to "Norton Ghost".  If so it is always good to have a clean backup image on hand.
 

now my question is, is this enough protection as im guessing theirs no active protection here? just on demand?

 
Avast is real time active protection as long as you configure it in it's programs settings to do so.  Malwarebytes and Super AntiSpyware, the free versions, are on demand scanners.  Both of those programs also offer paid versions with realtime protection.
 
You have a good setup here to protect yourself on line.  Just remember to follow the suggestions I outlined above and you are pretty well protected.  There is no way to make sure you are 100% safe but you are off to a good start.
 

also is it better to just buy a complete security suite (like bit defender etc) ???


I think you can get just as good protection with a suite of free tools such as you have as you can with a paid suite. Some people prefer to have everything in one place,  for ease of use,  but if you don't mind keeping on top of several programs instead of the one the free tools offer good protection.
 

i Remember reading a while back that everyone should bin windows and install Linux mint (whatever that is?)
i was told if your non techy etc go for linux as it never ever gets virus or malware

Linux is another operating systems like Windows is an Operating System. The "Mint" part refers to the distribution. Just like there is a Windows "XP" "Vista" "7", and "8" there are different "Versions" of linux refered to a "Distributions" some of the most popular being Ubuntu and Mint.

Linux is, in general, is a much more technical OS then Windows although many distro's are now attempting to bridge that gap by offering more user friendly interfaces in addition to  the more command line driven capabilities.

For someone at your skill level, if you are interested in learning Linux,  I would NOT ditch Windows, install Mint,  and use that as your main OS as you will be lost from the get go. Instead you might consider installing a second partition on your Windows OS and loading Mint onto that partition. That way you can boot into either OS. You can still use Windows for your regular work and load Mint when you want to learn about Linux. Information on how to create an additional partition so you can dual boot with Mint can be found here. This is a lengthy process but very doable.

http://lifehacker.com/5840387/how-to-dual-boot-windows-7-and-windows-8-side-by-side
 
Hope this information was of some help.   :)


Edited by Johnny Computer, 16 May 2014 - 07:58 PM.

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#4 quietman7

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 07:45 PM

ghostly (again i dnt understand it so just install and leave it be)


I am not familiar with "Ghostly". Are you maybe refering to "Norton Ghost". If so it is always good to have a clean backup image on hand.


I believe GreekEnigma is referring to Ghostery, a browser tool for Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera, Internet Explorer, which allows you to block beacons, trackers, advertising, analytics and widgets.I use it on all my machines.
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#5 Johnny Computer

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 07:46 PM

I see....Thanks Quietman. Checking that out for myself now :)

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#6 quietman7

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 07:49 PM

:thumbup2:
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#7 GreekEnigma

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 04:18 AM

 

 

ghostly (again i dnt understand it so just install and leave it be)


I am not familiar with "Ghostly". Are you maybe refering to "Norton Ghost". If so it is always good to have a clean backup image on hand.

 


I believe GreekEnigma is referring to Ghostery, a browser tool for Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera, Internet Explorer, which allows you to block beacons, trackers, advertising, analytics and widgets. I use it on all my machines.

 

yes i ment ghostery (typing error)

 

and basically years ago i was pretty good at pcs/fixing cars/diy etc (until something happened that i wont mention)

so now i find it hard to think (but fighting to get better)

 

also i knew mint was a distribution (just i heard mint was the best) i also heard backtrack is good (but i think thats about hacking)

 

ummmm i kind of knew how spywareblaster worked (and i always update and click enable all protection 1nce a week or so)

well ponly kind of as i have no clue what you ment by host files and other stuff?

 

as for ghostrey, what is  beacons, widgets, trackers, advertising, analytics and widgets. (i get trackers and advertising guessing ips of servers tracking for sales or something)

 

Avast free , yes i knew it has some real time protection, but i didnt mention it as i think its only mainly active virus protection and not malware adware protection (basically i think avast free has good active protection but not much malware,adware etc active or am i wrong)

 

so it seems the setup i use is ok? (i did use to build pcs etc but that was years ago before i got unwell etc) i wont mention what happened

 

well even with all this protection i think this laptop is badly infected (hence why i posted a log from dds on here) it was hijackfree online analysis that reported fake java and fake quicktime things plus more OUCHHHH

 

ummmmm i  am unwell and have alot on my plate (young brother living with me,trying to help mum, i wont say what with)

but beleive me these 2 years are going to be hectic

 

so lets say im ready in 2 years to learn about the internet and pcs (as im very new/virgin to the net ,i dnt even have a smart phone or tablet yet lol, just this laptop)

 

so anyway where would i start to get as good with pcs/ gain the knowledge to be like you guys?

how did you guys learn :)

 

thanks:)



#8 GreekEnigma

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 05:02 AM

something i forgot to mention

ok ive had my own place/internet forjust over a year now although my bro uses the net mostly (he lives with me)

 

anyway i just thought ive never ever changed the routers password (should i ?) as ive heard neally all the passwords are admin admin lol?

how wouldi know if  anyones hacked my router or changed settings etc

 

also my brother uses utorrent on this laptop alot (although he does scan right click/scan with avast before opening a downloaded folder etc

 

anyway hope some looks at my log soon as hijackfree says i have a keylogger or something (i dnt get emisoft antimaleware or hijackfree

i find they layout pretty bad and i find it confusing , and hijackfree is very very confusing (plus not very good as nearly everything says unsure what it is!!)

anyway will the log i posted show the things that hijackfree have said is fake java & quicktime logger etc?

 

ps im in uk, is this website uk people or american or global


Edited by GreekEnigma, 17 May 2014 - 05:03 AM.


#9 quietman7

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 06:46 AM

anyway i just thought ive never ever changed the routers password (should i ?) as ive heard neally all the passwords are admin admin lol?


Routers can be compromised if they have a weak or default password which attackers can easily guess or break using a dictionary attack or brute force attack. Malware which can modify routers are rare and may require the router to be a specific make, model and firmware revision.

Best Practice:
1. Keep up to date with all security information related to your router.
2. Always reset your router's default password with a with a strong password.

Consult these links to find out the default username and password for your router, and write down that information so it is available when doing the reset:These are general instructions for how to reset a router:
  • Unplug or turn off your DSL/cable modem.
  • Locate the router's reset button.
  • Press, and hold, the Reset button down for 30 seconds.
  • Wait for the Power, WLAN and Internet light to turn on (On the router).
  • Plug in or turn on your modem (if it is separate from the router).
  • Open your web browser to see if you have an Internet connection.
  • If you don't have an Internet connection you may need to restart your computer.
For more specific information on your particular model, check the owner's manual. If you do not have a manual, look for one on the vendor's web site which you can download and keep for future reference.
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#10 quietman7

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 06:47 AM

something i forgot to mention
...my brother uses utorrent on this laptop alot (although he does scan right click/scan with avast before opening a downloaded folder etc.

Using any torrent, file sharing, peer-to-peer (P2P) program (i.e. Limewire, eMule, Kontiki, BitTorrent, BitComet, uTorrent, BitLord, BearShare, Azureus/Vuze, Skype, etc) or visiting such sites is a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. In some cases the computer could be turned into a malware honeypot or zombie.

File sharing networks are thoroughly infested with malware according to security firm Norman ASA and many of them are unsafe to visit or use. The reason for this is that file sharing relies on its members giving and gaining unfettered access to computers across the P2P network. This practice can make you vulnerable to data and identity theft, system infection and remote access exploit by attackers who can take control of your computer without your knowledge.

...It is almost never safe to download executable programs from peer-to-peer file sharing networks because they are a major source of malware infections.

Software Cracks: A Great Way to Infect Your PC

Even if you change the risky default settings to a safer configuration, downloading files from an anonymous source increases your exposure to infection because the files you are downloading may actually contain a disguised threat. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install malware. Many malicious worms and Trojans, such as the Storm Worm, target and spread across P2P files sharing networks because of their known vulnerabilities.

Further some file sharing programs are bundled with other free software you may download (sometimes without the knowledge or consent of the user) and can be the source of various issues and problems to include Adware, and browser hijackers as well as malware.

Even the safest P2P file sharing programs that do not contain bundled spyware, still expose you to risks because of the very nature of the P2P file sharing process. By default, most P2P file sharing programs are configured to automatically launch at startup. They are also configured to allow other P2P users on the same network open access to a shared directory on your computer. The best way to eliminate these risks is to avoid using P2P applications and torrent web sites.Using P2P programs, file sharing or browsing torrent sites is almost a guaranteed way to get yourself infected!!
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#11 RevGAM

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 11:53 PM

Hi there!

Just a couple of notes for you.  I do hope that you will be successful in overcoming the disability that you are currently challenged with!

 

If you are using Ghostery (which I used to use), you may want to consider Do Not Track Me, which I believe to be a better product (although I could be wrong.

 

As an addendum to Johnny's comment about CCleaner:  if you are using it to clean your registry, you should stop.  Years ago, before learning of the risks, I used registry cleaners (popular ones) and, over time, I noticed that they degraded the performance of my computer and the quality of my computing experience.

 

If you want to use it to clean up temporary files, that's okay as long as you do a bit of research of which files/areas are best off left alone.  For example, BC doesn't recommend clearing old PreFetch data, but that is an option in CCleaner.  When in doubt, ask one of the experts here.

 

Please don't forget to back up your computer.  Before you do so, clean out temporary files (especially from your browser's cache and the Windows temporary files, which can eat up a lot of space), and then run a disk defragmenter on your system.  Piriform Defraggler and Auslogics Disk Defrag are good choices (I prefer the former but it doesn't work on my current system).  Note that Disk Defrag's free version has almost nothing in the way of settings.

 

Namaste, peace & love,

Glenn


Namaste, Peace & Love,
Glenn


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If you had to choose between saving just your family, or saving 10,000 GOOD people (but not your family), what would you choose?


#12 NickAu

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 12:11 AM

 

Instead you might consider installing a second partition on your Windows OS

Or you could just install Linux to a USB stick same process as installing to a Partition or HDD just select the USB during install, Then set the boot order on your PC like this

1 Optical Drive  ( great for Live Linux)

 

2 USB ( great for any Linux)

 

3 HDD ( With Windows :hysterical: )

 

Then when your PC boots it will look for option 1 if not found it will try option 2 ( If you have plugged in your USB stick with Linux on it it will boot Linux) If not.

It will go to option 3 and boot Windows :hysterical: .

 

PS

 

You will need to turn off secure boot for this.

 

I am sorry I should not bag Windows, Its a great secure stable OS. ........ Oh who am I kidding.


Edited by NickAu1, 25 May 2014 - 12:15 AM.

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#13 quietman7

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:39 AM

...If you are using Ghostery (which I used to use), you may want to consider Do Not Track Me, which I believe to be a better product (although I could be wrong.

Privacy plug-in showdown: Do Not Track Plus vs. Ghostery
‘DoNotTrackMe’ Add-On - Ghostery review
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#14 RevGAM

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 03:24 AM

@Quietman@: Good articles.

 

The digitaltrends article makes a good point that privacy add-ons (not just DNTM and Ghostery) can interfere with the functionality of websites or certain buttons.  One advocacy site I use still show the Facebook button to post the action item to, but the button won't work, while others work and still others don't show a button (not sure if there's supposed to be one - too lazy to find out).  The downside of this article is that it reviews the older DNT+ instead of DNTM.

 

The webmonkey article seems to be more current as it mentions that DNT+ was replaced by DNTM.

 

One thing I noticed is that neither mentions that DNTM not only blocks trackers (which is not just cookies but also links/buttons to social media websites), but it also offers the ability to mask your email - which I find infinitely useful when trying out free stuff from websites that require an email address.  Very easy to get off their email list if they don't have my real email in the first place!  You can also go into the email masking options to delete the temporary email addresses when you are sure you don't need them (you only get about 8 at a time from opayq.com).  If you pay for DNTM (Pro?), you also get credit card and phone number protection.

 

@Nick@: I just read an article that points out how flawed and crappy Windows really is, and how insecure the world of computing really is, mentioning vulnerabilities in things like libpurple and stuff.  Windows has always been crappy but that didn't stop Gates from marketing it as if it were amazing.  It's really sad but most people can't afford Mac OS, which is (or used to be) more secure and aren't comfortable with CLI OSes like Linux, although I see there have been some big improvements in some of the GUIs for some Linux distros.  One wonders if they also sacrificed security for ease of use...


Namaste, Peace & Love,
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#15 quietman7

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 06:20 AM

The digitaltrends article makes a good point that privacy add-ons (not just DNTM and Ghostery) can interfere with the functionality of websites or certain buttons.

Yes but at least with Ghostery....you can temporarily disable it and reload the page.
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