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Baking GPU in oven to revive!


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#1 texasmitch14

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 10:00 AM

I recently discovered my GPU is dying/dead, which is causing me a mess of problems on my PC. Before I fork out a few hundred bucks on a GPU- I have been reading up on a method to ressurect GPUs by baking them in the oven. Now I know it sounds weird if you have never heard of this method before, but a quick google search, or youtube search will show people using this method with success.


I just had a few concerns before I be another guenia pig in this experiment. I don't expect everyone to know the answers to all these questions, as it seems this method is very unorthadox.


-Why does foil need to be placed in the 4 corners of the card, elevating it while it is baking in the oven?


-Does this only work on certain GPUs? Or it will clean all makes and models?


-I am going to take out my GPU and post some pictures. What all needs to be removed before I put it in the oven. I know that the plastic need to be taken off. But would really like some specific parts that I need to remove so I don't burn my card down. (Most of the youtube vids just show people throwing it in the oven, not the process of tearing down the GPU so it's just the card; People mention some sort of paste, do you happen to know if I need to buy anything for this method?)


And of course, if you think this is not a good idea; let me know! Anyone with experience with this would be greatly appreciated.

Edited by texasmitch14, 15 May 2014 - 10:01 AM.


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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 05:56 PM

I haven't looked at any of these videos but what I suspect is happening is that people are doing this as a means of re-flowing the solder to repair faulty solder joints. Solder melts at around 200C.

 

If you believe, from a careful visual inspection, that faulty joints are at the root of your problem, the technique might work, I have no personal experience of doing this at all.

 

HOWEVER, you will need to remove the heat sink and main chip, unless it is soldered in, any plastic on the board (plastic melts at less than 200C) and anything else that can be removed that isn't actually soldered on. I would then pre-heat the oven before I put the card in and leave it in for as short a period as necessary. One minute good, two minutes better does not apply here - electronic components do NOT like getting very hot for sustained periods.

 

The paste referred to is called either 'thermal paste' or 'heat sink paste/compound'. You need it any time you remove any heatsink. Clean the mating surfaces thoroughly and apply a thin smear to one of them before re-mounting the heatsink.

 

This sounds a thoroughly dangerous procedure to me with a very high risk of wrecking the card. Use it only if you are convinced faulty solder joints are your problem, it definitely will not fix any other problems.

 

If you decide to try this as a last resort, I wish you luck - but be prepared to buy a new card !

 

Chris Cosgrove


I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !


#3 texasmitch14

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 06:02 PM

I haven't looked at any of these videos but what I suspect is happening is that people are doing this as a means of re-flowing the solder to repair faulty solder joints. Solder melts at around 200C.

 

If you believe, from a careful visual inspection, that faulty joints are at the root of your problem, the technique might work, I have no personal experience of doing this at all.

 

HOWEVER, you will need to remove the heat sink and main chip, unless it is soldered in, any plastic on the board (plastic melts at less than 200C) and anything else that can be removed that isn't actually soldered on. I would then pre-heat the oven before I put the card in and leave it in for as short a period as necessary. One minute good, two minutes better does not apply here - electronic components do NOT like getting very hot for sustained periods.

 

The paste referred to is called either 'thermal paste' or 'heat sink paste/compound'. You need it any time you remove any heatsink. Clean the mating surfaces thoroughly and apply a thin smear to one of them before re-mounting the heatsink.

 

This sounds a thoroughly dangerous procedure to me with a very high risk of wrecking the card. Use it only if you are convinced faulty solder joints are your problem, it definitely will not fix any other problems.

 

If you decide to try this as a last resort, I wish you luck - but be prepared to buy a new card !

 

Chris Cosgrove

Thanks for the reply and suggestions!

 

I ended up buying a new card; was too scared to do this experiment alone :P It was in fact a bad/dying GFX card.  But I have been watching many videos on youtube of people doing it, and apperently it also cleans the card out?(I could be wrong, one video I was watching after it came out of the oven the OP was saying he had never seen his card so clean, could be wrong on this one.).

 

Also, in some of the forums/posts I was reading that these graphics cards are in fact put through ovens to make them and can withstand the heat, but after removing what you said of course.

 

I showed a friend about this and was so intrigued he wants to try it out when he gets back in town. So if this thread is still open, I will post the results to see if it works. (The card is dead; when I boot I get black and white bars/lines. Flickering colors. Can't load any .exe program/game. Couldn't update the driver, etc. So I will know if it did in fact fix it.

 

thanks for the post :D



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 06:27 PM

I believe circuit boards are baked as part of the board making process, but not as part of the assembly process. Surface mount components are then actually put in place with a very small dab of glue and the board and the stuck on components are then given a very quick - and very accurately controlled - dip in a bath of molten solder to make the necessary soldered connections.

 

By all means post back if you try this and let us know what happens - threads stay open unless 'locked' by a moderator for infringing forum rules or going seriously off topic - I for one will be interested.

 

There is no need to quote a reply to your post in your next post. With rare exceptions all posts stay in the thread in the sequence in which they were created. Quoting is very useful if you want to highlight a particular point someone has raised before going on to address it, but you almost never need to quote a complete post.

 

Chris Cosgrove


I am going to be away until about the 22nd October. Time on-line will be reduced and my internet access may be limited. PMs may not be replied to as quickly as normal !


#5 texasmitch14

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 06:31 PM

Understood. Will post results once experiment is conducted.






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