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What temperature is too hot?


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#1 I have a computer...

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 04:41 PM

I used Speccy to see what temperature stuff on my computer was running at.

I do not know much about computer hardware so I was wondering how hot is too hot?

It says:

 

CPU

Intel Core 2 Quad Q6700 @ 2.66GHz    62 °C
Kentsfield 65nm Technology

 

Motherboard

Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd. EP41T-UD3L (Socket 775)    34 °C

 

Graphics

SyncMaster (1024x768@60Hz)
1024MB ATI AMD Radeon HD 6670 (ATI AIB)    36 °C

 

Storage

465GB Western Digital WDC WD5000AADS-00M2B0 ATA Device (SATA)    37 °C

 

 

Are those temperatures too high? My computer does have some dust on the vents and I was wondering if it would need cleaning out and new thermal paste?

 

Thanks

(I hope I posted this in the right spot)


Edited by I have a computer..., 06 May 2014 - 04:41 PM.


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#2 synergy513

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 04:51 PM

i have a c2q 6600, and it is a hot one, 62 celsius is borderline. over 70 is danger zone.

 

all of your other temps are nice and cool though.

 

the only way i got mine cruising in the 40c range was to install a dedicated fan over the mobo northbridge.

 

a hot cpu is usually brought on by a clogged heatsink or thermal compound not functioning properly

 

if you clean out your cpu fan and heatsink, that would be a great start, they do get dusty.


Edited by synergy513, 06 May 2014 - 04:51 PM.

Moore's Law : 4d Graph in Progress


#3 hamluis

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 12:23 PM

I would replace the thermal grease/compound used between heatsink and CPU.

 

Doesn't take a lot of time, minimal inconvenience, saves worrying about it.

 

In general...any temp below 50 Celsius is nothing to worry about, regardless of component.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 09 May 2014 - 10:43 AM.


#4 I have a computer...

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 12:00 PM

Thanks for your answers.

 

If Im doing something like playing a computer game or using an adobe flash player heavy website the fan normally gets really loud so I decided to see what temp the CPU was running at when the fan gets that loud and it was... ready... running at 82 C!!!

SO I will clean out the computer soon and see if I could replace the thermal grease aswell.

 

But the fan getting really loud isnt anything new, I never thought anything of it before.So I wonder how long the CPU will last for even if I do clean out the computer and replace the thermal grease.

 

If the CPU stops working one day what would happen? How will it affect the computer? What does the CPU even do?


Edited by I have a computer..., 08 May 2014 - 12:01 PM.


#5 synergy513

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 12:22 PM

if the temperatures get too high, the cpu will power down the whole system to avoid permanent damage.

 

 

cleaning the heatsink and fan is a great start, re-doing the thermal compound is a task requires a little research to be sure it is done right.

 

aftermarket cpu coolers can also be a solution. those getups can range in price between $60 - 200.  i have an air cooled aftermarket cooler on my c2q 6600  and i am satisfied with it.


Moore's Law : 4d Graph in Progress


#6 jonuk76

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 08:02 PM


 

But the fan getting really loud isnt anything new, I never thought anything of it before.So I wonder how long the CPU will last for even if I do clean out the computer and replace the thermal grease.

 

If the CPU stops working one day what would happen? How will it affect the computer? What does the CPU even do?

 

82c is too hot for that CPU.  As a method of self preservation the CPU will slow itself down (throttle) to attempt to lower its temperature, and might shut down altogether.  Who knows how long it will last but it's unlikely permanent damage has been caused unless it's been really badly overheated.  My Core i5 was briefly running at 95 degrees two years ago and I noticed it was throttling.  It was dust causing it, after cleaning up the heatsink it's still going strong now with daily use...

 

As for what does the CPU do - pretty much everything.  Without it you effectively have no computer...

 

There should be plenty of good video guides to cleaning heatsinks and replacing thermal paste on youtube.  As for thermal paste, I'd suggest Arctic Cooling MX-2 as it's pretty cheap, works well and is very easy to apply.

 

If you decided to go for aftermarket cooling, you don't have to spend as much as $60 but do check whatever you get will fit in your case.  The tower style coolers with 120mm fan won't fit in smaller cases for example.

 

Here's a handful of cheaper ones that I think work OK (and will certainly outperform a stock Intel cooler)

 

Coolermaster 212 Evo (big, for larger cases)

Coolermaster Hyper TX3 (medium size for most tower cases)

Zalman CNPS10X Optima (big for larger cases)

Zalman CNPS8900 Quiet (low profile for small cases)


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#7 synergy513

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 04:51 PM

thanks jonuk, that is a great report. i didn't think about alotting for the space the case provides...

 

here is my socket 775 cooler , it is a bulky unit, but unique..........

 

http://uk.thermaltake.com/products-model_gallery.aspx?id=C_00001476


Edited by synergy513, 09 May 2014 - 05:05 PM.

Moore's Law : 4d Graph in Progress


#8 bludshot

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:34 PM

In my opinion, those temps are fine. Certainly all the ones in the 30's are normal. Your cpu is a bit on the hot side, but it's not uncommon. If your pc never shuts down from overheating, if you never experience instability in video games (such as random bad slow downs or crazy graphical glitches), then you don't need to do anything actually.

 

Save your money for your next PC.


Edited by bludshot, 09 May 2014 - 11:34 PM.


#9 I have a computer...

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 07:41 PM

Thanks everyone for your replies it has been helpful!

 

I have not cleaned out my computer yet, I am a little bit hesitant.

Normally people use like a can of comressed air but I read somewhere they leave residue and thats its not air its chemicals and it can freeze stuff and if you turn it at an angle it lets out liquid and you can't use a vacuum cleaner because of the static build up.

What else could I use to clean that would be safe?

 

Also, would outside be an OK place to clean it? Would direct sunlight damage the computer components?


Edited by I have a computer..., 11 May 2014 - 07:45 PM.


#10 bludshot

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 09:25 PM

I use a central vacuum but I ground it constantly. Other guys on here say you absolutely should never do that, so I can't recommend it as it may fry your computer, but that's what I do. You could use a completely dry sports squeezy water bottle or anything like that (to blow air).

 

If you're going with blowing, you will want to be outside or all the dust goes in your house.

 

Direct sunlight will not damage the computer components. Leaving your computer outside alone for hours in the sun might though.



#11 hamluis

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 08:49 AM

"Canned air" can result in something liquid being expelled (as can anything under pressure, IMO) but I've never found it to be a problem on any system I've owned.  It dries.

 

I believe simply shaking the can well and following the directions for spraying...make that a non-consideration.

 

Just a personal user, not a "tech" or IT person here :).

 

Louis






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