Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Firewalls


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:52 PM

Posted 06 May 2014 - 07:30 AM

I'm looking at changing my firewall software (note 1), and I'm wondering what the folks here are using, and why.  I don't want to say what I'm using now, so answers won't be skewed.

The one I use now is very popular, and I've been pleased with it.  However in the last two major versions, the installation has got to be really huge, and the interface has become convoluted, and the version that I like, isn't supported on my version of Windows (its two major versions old).  I have the current version of the firewall installed.

So what firewall (note Windows Firewall) do you use, and why do you like it?  Thanks to all in advance that care to share their thoughts!  I'm looking for an effective program, with a simple interface.

Notes:
1.  Windows Firewall, McAfee and Norton/Symantec isn't an option!



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 50,563 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:52 PM

Posted 06 May 2014 - 08:49 PM

I and many of our members/staff use Windows Firewall...why is it not an option for you?
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#3 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:52 PM

Posted 07 May 2014 - 07:32 AM

Some time ago, I worked for a company, and quite a few computers were breached that used Windows Firewall. They went to another one, and it never happened again while I was there, and their logs showed attempts, but no success. It should be noted, that the computers that where breached wasn't in my department, but the help desk folks. I know this from the contacts I had in the company. Have a good day.

#4 NextHopRouter

NextHopRouter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central United States
  • Local time:03:52 PM

Posted 07 May 2014 - 07:46 AM

I actually use a hardware firewall (Cisco ASA) and Comodo. I only use Comodo because it's free and I don't want to pay for one. I usually get mad at the excessive pop-ups and disable it, or uninstall it. So, Windows Firewall it is for me (when using Windows)...  :)



#5 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 50,563 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:52 PM

Posted 07 May 2014 - 01:05 PM

There is nothing wrong with using a hardware firewall together with a software firewall.

A hardware-based firewall is essentially a software firewall running on a dedicated piece of hardware or specialized device (routers, broadband gateways) that sits between a modem and a computer or network. These types of firewalls are based on Network Address Translation (NAT) which hides your computer from the Internet or NAT plus Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI). A hardware firewall typically uses packet filtering to examine the header of a packet to determine its source and destination addresses. This information is compared to a set of predefined or user-created rules that determine whether the packet is allowed (forwarded) or denied (dropped) on particular ports. Hardware firewalls can provide a strong degree of protection from most forms of attacks coming from the outside (incoming traffic). They are easy to configure and can protect every machine on a local or home network.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#6 NextHopRouter

NextHopRouter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central United States
  • Local time:03:52 PM

Posted 07 May 2014 - 01:47 PM

There is nothing wrong with using a hardware firewall together with a software firewall.

A hardware-based firewall is essentially a software firewall running on a dedicated piece of hardware or specialized device (routers, broadband gateways) that sits between a modem and a computer or network. These types of firewalls are based on Network Address Translation (NAT) which hides your computer from the Internet or NAT plus Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI). A hardware firewall typically uses packet filtering to examine the header of a packet to determine its source and destination addresses. This information is compared to a set of predefined or user-created rules that determine whether the packet is allowed (forwarded) or denied (dropped) on particular ports. Hardware firewalls can provide a strong degree of protection from most forms of attacks coming from the outside (incoming traffic). They are easy to configure and can protect every machine on a local or home network.

 

Yea, I personally have an affinity to software for the sake of memory, resources, etc. I don't have anything personally against them, I just don't care to use them. I don't keep anything on my computer I can't afford to lose.



#7 philfil

philfil

  • Members
  • 52 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Local time:10:52 PM

Posted 07 May 2014 - 02:19 PM

I use the Windows firewall on my Windows 7 computer. Previously, I used the Comodo firewall, which I found to be very good, but it seemed to contribute to a number of stability problems which appeared after I unstalled service pack 1. All I can say about this effect is that the problems went away when I switched from the Comodo firewall to the Windows firewall (problems related to very long boot up times and stalling). I still don't know what the underlying cause of these problems was. It could be related to the large number of options that one is presented with in setting up the Comodo firewall. Perhaps I chose the wrong ones. There are default settings but these might not be the most secure.

 

So far, I have had no problems with the Windows firewall.


Edited by philfil, 07 May 2014 - 02:21 PM.


#8 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:52 PM

Posted 08 May 2014 - 01:49 PM

The current firewall I use is COMODO, and as I've said, the interface is too convoluted, and the install size has gotten really large.  Like another user said, the excessive popups have gotten to be a pain (my words).

1.  SYMANTEC/NORTON.  I've abandoned Symantec/Norton products COMPLETELY.  I was a die hard SYMANTEC/NORTON until around 2007, or so.  The last good firewall/antivirus software they had was Norton Internet Security 2006.  About that time, they removed the live scanning of things downloaded from the Internet, requiring the user to scan everything manually.  This put the user's computer at risk.

2.  MCAFEE.  When I got clobbered with viruses in the fall of 1995, MCAFEE only found about 1/2 the viruses that SYMANTEC/NORTON did (600+).  I saved the viruses to floppy, and I've performed the same tests with different versions of SYMANTEC/NORTON and MCAFEE products until 5 or so years ago.  The results where the same.  I won't use MCAFEE products, no matter what they are.

3.  AVG.  Their antivirus is substandard.  I've seen more complaints viruses getting onto users computers, than any other antivirus software.  In fact, with the 600 viruses I save to floppy, AVG only discovered 5 out of about 600, or 0.83%.  So it is reasonable to conclude that their Internet Security is just as bad, so there's no reason to waste my time with it.

4.  KASPERSKY.  I will not use it, free or not, because of the country of origin.

5.  ZONEALARM.  The free version didn't have all the features I wanted, like the paid version.

I'm testing another firewall on a test computer.  Before I went to AVAST and COMODO, I ended up testing AV/Firewalls for about 1.5 years, before I made my choice.  It's called testing, testing, testing!          :busy:



#9 MysteryMac

MysteryMac

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:52 PM

Posted 14 May 2014 - 11:16 AM

This may be out of your technical experience, but I use PFSense on an older machine as my router/firewall. It is awesome. If I were you and are interested in learning something new then check out PFSense.

 

P.S. NEVER USE ZONEALARM!


Edited by MysteryMac, 14 May 2014 - 11:16 AM.


#10 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 50,563 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:52 PM

Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:19 PM

pfSense project
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#11 Didier Stevens

Didier Stevens

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,620 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:52 PM

Posted 14 May 2014 - 05:33 PM

You can also buy network appliances with pfSense. Google for "pfsense appliance".

Didier Stevens
http://blog.DidierStevens.com
http://DidierStevensLabs.com

SANS ISC Handler
Microsoft MVP 2011-2016 Consumer Security, Windows Insider MVP 2016-2018
MVP_Horizontal_BlueOnly.png

 

If you send me messages, per Bleeping Computer's Forum policy, I will not engage in a conversation, but try to answer your question in the relevant forum post. If you don't want this, don't send me messages.

 

Stevens' law: "As an online security discussion grows longer, the probability of a reference to BadUSB approaches 1.0"


#12 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,230 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:07:52 AM

Posted 15 May 2014 - 01:18 AM

M0n0wall is a nice software firewall for those with a little know how too...



#13 jeffce

jeffce

    Bleepin' Super Saiyan


  • Malware Response Team
  • 3,442 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA
  • Local time:03:52 PM

Posted 15 May 2014 - 06:55 AM

Even though I have moved to a Linux based system and obviously don't use a Window firewall any longer, I was quite fond of it.  I had tried the most recent Comodo FW but just took so long to boot.  It is just my opinion, but if you have a Windows machine and are at home behind an encrypted router then you should be just fine.  I will admit, I did keep Comodo on my system for when I traveled and would be on different networks.  I would start Comodo then, but that was probably just my own paranoia.  :)  


WFxJwA4.png
 
mvp_horizontal_fullcolor-(copy2).jpeg
 


#14 scotty_ncc1701

scotty_ncc1701
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 520 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:52 PM

Posted 20 June 2014 - 07:25 AM

Well, it's been just over 3 months since I told COMODO Internet Security to take a hike, on the test computer, and about a month on my live computers (mine and my wife's).  The new firewall is working very well, and I'm pleased with it.  There will be the OCCASIONAL repeat questions about allowing a program to run, but, that's not an issue, because I expected it, because of what I did on the computer.  But nothing like COMODO Internet Security

For example, the Toshiba my wife uses was "converted" to the new firewall, and I used my new firewall configuration.  As expected, I had to remove some entries, because she's on Windows 7 (32-bit), and I'm on Windows 8.1U (64-bit).  But on the entries that matched up, there were questions, that basically said, "(whatever program) has changed, so you want to keep the entry", this is expected.  I told the new firewall yes, and once the initial setup and the yes/no answers to the above questions was done, all was fine.

Some may not like the interface because it's very plain, some call it Window 95ish.  The look doesn't matter to me, it's the functionality.  It doesn't continually ask for permission to allow programs I previously told it was safe to run, or to run programs I told it was OK for it to run previous, which my big problem with COMODO was.

 

Have a good day all!
 



#15 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 50,563 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:04:52 PM

Posted 20 June 2014 - 08:50 AM

Glad to hear everything is working out for you.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users