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Using my 64GB SSD Drive to boot from and another drive for storage!


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#1 cap2587

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 02:09 PM

I am wanting to install my W8 O/S onto a 64GB SSD drive. I just want to use this for boot purposes and to fit some programs on as well. Everything else I am wanting to have stored on a 1TB WD Black drive.  I want to point my libraries (Docs, Music, pictures) towards the 1TB drive.  How do I do this?  Appreciate any feedback on this.  Thanks



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 02:45 PM

64GB really isn't sufficient for the average user to use as a Windows boot drive.  If the drive manufacturer is using 64GB to mean 64x1000 and not 64x1024 you're going to lose 1.2GB.  Windows 8 is going to take 20GB (assuming 64 bit).  If you keep your page file on the SSD (required for memory dumps) you will lose the space equal to your RAM.  Then you have temp files, programs that default to C: for everything, and data.



#3 cat1092

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 12:28 AM

64GB really isn't sufficient for the average user to use as a Windows boot drive.  If the drive manufacturer is using 64GB to mean 64x1000 and not 64x1024 you're going to lose 1.2GB.  Windows 8 is going to take 20GB (assuming 64 bit).  If you keep your page file on the SSD (required for memory dumps) you will lose the space equal to your RAM.  Then you have temp files, programs that default to C: for everything, and data.

While it may be true it could become cramped, 64GB is enough, provided there's an extra drive for data & things such as games & virtual machines are ran from a separate drive. Probably could install a couple of games, if desired.

 

On my Toshiba notebook, am dual booting Windows 7 Pro & 8.1 Pro, plus have Windows 7's recovery partition on a 128GB Crucial M4 SSD, with almost 40% of it free. And plenty of apps installed on each OS. I do have System Restore disabled & the pagefile set at 512MB, with 8GB RAM, I don't see the need to have a large one.

 

Have a an identical setup on this MSI that I'm on at the moment, only it's an 180GB Intel 330 SSD, well over half of it is still free.

 

And on my Dell, as posted in my Speccy snapshot below, is barely using 30GB for Windows 7 Pro.

 

The main con that I see with a 64GB SSD, is that 120-128GB models costs just a few more dollars, like around $15-$25.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 Kilroy

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 09:33 AM

I guess my point is that if you're asking how to do this on a 64GB drive, it won't work for you.  I recommend a 120GB drive as a minimum for a SSD boot drive.  There are way too many programs that toss things on your C: drive, even if you install the programs to another drive, Thunderbird and iTunes are the two that were causing me issues.  I'm not saying it can't be done, but this drive is too small for the average user to configure and actually use.  As more and more software is installed and the longer the machine is used the likelihood of having an issue with running out of space on the boot drive is more likely.



#5 WhiteZero

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 09:47 AM

64GB really isn't sufficient for the average user to use as a Windows boot drive.  If the drive manufacturer is using 64GB to mean 64x1000 and not 64x1024 you're going to lose 1.2GB.  Windows 8 is going to take 20GB (assuming 64 bit).  If you keep your page file on the SSD (required for memory dumps) you will lose the space equal to your RAM.  Then you have temp files, programs that default to C: for everything, and data.

I've been running OS and programs on my 250GB Samsung drive since December, and I'm still using less the 50GB. I think OP will probably be fine on 64GB. But yeah, bumping to 120GB would be more "future proof"



#6 cat1092

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 10:17 PM

 

I've been running OS and programs on my 250GB Samsung drive since December, and I'm still using less the 50GB. I think OP will probably be fine on 64GB. But yeah, bumping to 120GB would be more "future proof"

That's exactly how my XPS 8700 is setup, OS is on 120GB Samsung 840 EVO (look at my specs below) & I'm barely using 30GB of that. Actually the SSD shows as 100GB, as I allowed the rest for overprovisioning (OP). This allows the drive to perform better & last longer, also will ensure it won't be overfilled.

 

It's good to set aside 10% of SSD space for OP & no software is needed other than a partitioning tool, though software included with Samsung SSD's provides for this. Just shrink the OS install space by 10% or greater & you're done (a reboot may be needed). Be sure to check partition alignment afterwards. Do not create a partition in the space, leave it free, everything will fall into place.

 

Today's SSD's are priced so well that I could never justify purchasing a 64GB one. There are some 240GB models in the $120 range, that's 4x the space for just twice the price. And many 120-128GB models in the $75-100 bracket.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 NickAu

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 10:24 PM

 

As a result of its benchmarks, Anandtech recommends that you “plan on using only about 75% of its capacity if you want a good balance between performance consistency and capacity.” In other words, set aside 25% of your drive and don’t write to it. Only use up to 75% of your drive’s free space and you should maintain ideal performance. You’ll see write performance start to slow down as you go above that mark.

http://www.howtogeek.com/165472/6-things-you-shouldnt-do-with-solid-state-drives/



#8 cat1092

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 11:40 PM

 

 

As a result of its benchmarks, Anandtech recommends that you “plan on using only about 75% of its capacity if you want a good balance between performance consistency and capacity.” In other words, set aside 25% of your drive and don’t write to it. Only use up to 75% of your drive’s free space and you should maintain ideal performance. You’ll see write performance start to slow down as you go above that mark.

http://www.howtogeek.com/165472/6-things-you-shouldnt-do-with-solid-state-drives/

 

Chances are that I'll soon do this on my Dell, I could easily reduce the OS partition size by an additional 10-15GB & it not be noticed. Even at 85GB, I'd still have 55GB free space, not including the OP reserved.

 

I'm soon going to add a second SSD (240GB) & remove HDD's altogether from the PC, as this will not only reduce power demands, it also will be cooler on the inside. HDD's do throw off heat while in use. As for a Data partition, I can run that through a USB 3.0 enclosure.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 NickAu

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 12:26 AM

I just installed a 256 GB SSD on my laptop with Kubuntu on it. Oh my its good, Boots fast, Stuff loads fast, well worth it.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/SanDisk-Ultra-Plus-Solid-State-Drive-256GB-SSD-530MB-s-SATA-6Gbit-s-7mm-storage-/261240964747?pt=AU_HardDrives&hash=item3cd32cc68b


Edited by NickAu1, 03 May 2014 - 12:28 AM.


#10 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 12:59 AM

To relocate Documents, Pictures and libraries items, please watch the below video tutorial.

 



#11 OldPhil

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 05:49 AM

Another thought is that most info out there states SSD's do in fact wear out, no question this takes than a spinner.  But in thinking about it will a smaller drive with the same amount of data as a larger one will be worked harder and wear out a bit faster?


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#12 cat1092

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 12:11 PM

Another thought is that most info out there states SSD's do in fact wear out, no question this takes than a spinner.  But in thinking about it will a smaller drive with the same amount of data as a larger one will be worked harder and wear out a bit faster?

It probably would wear out faster, one reason being the much less number of Flash cells within the SSD. Much more writes would be created on a small SSD, causing it to fail in lass time than say, a 120-128GB model.

 

Again, at today's SSD prices, unless one is really that tight for cash, it's best to go with a 120GB model. The Samsung 840 EVO that I'm now running is only $85 on the Newegg site, I've seen it as low as $75. Am going to grab a 240GB model when those goes on promo again, anywhere in the $120 price range. These currently goes for $155-160, but there are promos.

 

That will allow for me to dual boot Windows 7 Pro & the Dell OEM Windows 8, I can then use the 120GB model for Linux Mint 17 LTS (when released).

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 cap2587

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 06:22 PM

Thanks for all of the good information.  I just upgraded my Hackintosh to a 240GB SSD, therefore I have a 64GB that I took out of that machine.  I will start using it as my boot drive in my windows machine. If I eventually run out of room on this drive I will buy a 120GB and clone the smaller drive.  I got my Kingston 240GB SSD for $90/  Prices are coming way down on the 120/240 GB SSD's.  Appreciate the help.  



#14 NickAu

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 06:28 PM

 

therefore I have a 64GB that I took out of that machine

Try Linux on it.

 

 

I got my Kingston 240GB SSD for $90

Where? Was it online? Can I have the link please?



#15 cat1092

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 08:35 PM

 

Where? Was it online? Can I have the link please?

It was likely on promo. I've seen the Kingston V300's around that price at least once in recent months.

 

In the meantime, the 240GB Samsung EVO that I desire jumped $5 today. Hope that the SSD glut isn't over. The 120GB model went up by the same amount, to $90, urging me to pull the trigger.

 

NickAu1, here was one of the links for that Kingston $90 SSD (3rd row).

 

http://www.techbargains.com/catsearch.cfm/0_11_1

 

EDIT: NickAu1, here's a Crucial M500, 240GB from Amazon, however you have to go through FatWallet for coupon (1st on 2nd row).

 

http://www.fatwallet.com/ssd-deals/

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 04 May 2014 - 08:50 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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