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Programming Anti-malware Software


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#1 Elendil

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Posted 21 May 2006 - 08:01 PM

What programming language would be the most powerful and efficient in creating an anti-malware program? I have basic knowledge of VB 6, but VB.net is out so I feel slapped. C++ is the most common no?
Stanford '14
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#2 Alan-LB

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 01:58 AM

"Malware" means everything bad that comes over the net. That is a very broad range of software including Viruses, Trojans, Worms, rediallers, Spyware, keyloggers and so on.

I would suspect that you would need more than one program to cover everything. So what "malware" do you have in mind? Why would you bother since there is a lot of very comprehensive and effective software already available? Such software has taken teams of programmers years to develop - what do you hope to achieve?

C++ is very common, but just because it is common does not mean it is the most suitable language. I suspect that it would be the best language, not because it is common, but because it is basically a "system developers" language and you would need to work very close to the computer.

Judging by your question I suspect that you would have a long way to go!

Good luck!

Alan
There are 10 types of people - those who understand binary and those who don't!!

Today is the Beta version of Tomorrow!

#3 Elendil

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 04:31 PM

Anti-Spyware, Greyware, and those such malware. Basically, it's part of an innovative idea for my next year's science fair project.
Stanford '14
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#4 Alan-LB

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 01:54 AM

Anti-Spyware is not "malware" - just the opposite since it is designed to track down and eliminate Spyware.

I think you may need to take the first steps first. That is, determine in detail what you hope to achieve. What is your aim in writing a program - to attack viruses, or spyware, or Trojans, or worms or whatever else. Have you done any research into the different types and distribution of malware? What in depth details have you gathered about the various forms of malware? Have you done any basic Systems Analysis or even a preliminary design?

Until you have decided what you want to achieve, you will not know how to design your program. And until then you will not know which will the best programming language to use.

C++ is a very good low level language for Systems Development and "close to the computer" programming. However, it is not an easy language to learn and you certainly would not be able to achieve what you seem to want without intensive and prolonged study. Working on your own, I suspect that the project would take you well over a year. :thumbsup:

You say you have only a "basic" knowledge of VB6 and your question "C++ is the most common no?" would suggest that you should undertake a simpler task to start with - like learning the language first. That alone will occupy you for many months.

Good luck!

Alan
There are 10 types of people - those who understand binary and those who don't!!

Today is the Beta version of Tomorrow!

#5 Elendil

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 06:39 AM

The message came out wrong; to make it less confusing here's what I meant:

Anti-(spyware, greyware, and other such malware).

And as for the time concern, I have 4 1/2 full years to complete it (I'm willing to work that tediously and precisely for that long because my idea with make it Intel IEEE and win if I complete it).
Stanford '14
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#6 Alan-LB

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Posted 24 May 2006 - 11:59 PM

As a programmer of more than 40 years I would advise you to set yourself graded projects. Start with something quite small at first - but complete every step of the project in the very best way you can - Systems Analysis, Systems Design, Program Design, Data Design, Coding, Testing and debugging. And document every step - that will be your history for you to build on. By completing one project at a very high level of expertise will give you good experience for all future projects. set yourself high standards.

Aim to be the best you can - first the small project then grow slowly as you expertise grows. Remember Mr Myagi advice in the "Karate Kid" :thumbsup:

If you "jump in the deep end" too soon you may become lost in the complexity of what you are doing and miss out on the necessary basics of programming.

I would suggest using C++. Get yourself a couple of good reference manuals on the language and the libraries. Get to know them well. Take them to bed at night and read them - (instead of Playboy!!). There are many references on the net so learn to use Google well. Search for forums, code examples, short programs that you can download, analyse and learn from.

I wish you luck. Programming is a fantastic career - creative, demanding and rewarding. But remember, anyone can write a "hello World" program in five minutes - that does NOT make them a programmer. If you feel that this advice is not worth bothering with, it may be that you are not cut out to be a programmer after all.

Good luck - the world needs programmers - not good ones but excellent ones.

Hope I have not bored you with my ravings!

Alan
There are 10 types of people - those who understand binary and those who don't!!

Today is the Beta version of Tomorrow!




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