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Clicking and squeaking noise from hard drive when program tries to scan it


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#1 signofzeta

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 04:56 AM

I can do short scans, and the scans are fine.

 

Here are the situations when the hard drive makes clicking and squeaking noises.

 

Running full scans of basically any anti-malware or antivirus program.

 

Running ChkDsk

 

Running the seatools for windows short drive self test.

 

 

All situations lead to some sort of blue screen of death.  Is my hard drive really dying?

 

Copying, moving, writing, and deleting files does NOT cause hard drive to click and squeak, or at least I haven't heard it yet.  Maybe the hard drive did click, but I don't remember if it did or not.  Probably not.

 

If I know that doing the above tasks makes my hard drive click and squeak, does it mean that if I constantly try to do those tasks, my hard drive will die faster, or is my hard drive dying at the same rate, no matter if it is constantly clicking and sqeaking or not?

 

Most of the normal tasks I do on this laptop, the hard drive does not click or squeak loudly, although it means getting rid of malware and viruses may be a tough task.

 

Clicking and squeaking started last year, and my laptop still runs fine.  I anticipate my hard drive dying, but it is still going.  Tell me, is it truly the act of clicking and squeakng that drains the life out of the hard drive, or when you hear some clicks and squeaks,and you don't hear it ever again, your hard drive isn't going to die?


Edited by signofzeta, 29 April 2014 - 04:59 AM.


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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 06:58 AM

IMO change out the drive, maybe even swap for an SSD.  Waiting for it to fail in not good idea!


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#3 signofzeta

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 11:34 AM

What if it does fail?  Does it destroy other components within the computer if my hard drive fails?  At this point in time, I already have another laptop, but I just want to know how many days, months, or years I can squeeze out of this computer.

 

The noise I am describing is like this.  Imagine the noise that  hard drive normally makes when it is in operation.  You hear faint clicking noises right?  Imagine that noise, but louder.  That is the noise I am hearing during those antimalware, chkdsk, and hard drive test scans.

 

I also have a desktop that runs the outdated windows xp.  It is my dedicated computer for running anything that does not run properly on vista, 7, and 8, and is only used for that purpose.  The computer is offline, so the whole windows xp end of support scare does not apply here.  I do want to keep make sure that hard drive lives as long as possible, so I will ask this.  What kills a hard drive faster?  Leaving the computer on, or repeatedly turning it on when using it and shutting it down when done with it?  Let's make up a hypothetical situation.  Let's say I only use that computer once every 12 days.  Better to leave it on for 11 days, or have it off for 11 day, and turn it on on the 12th day, but then shut it down when the day is over?


Edited by signofzeta, 29 April 2014 - 12:37 PM.


#4 OldPhil

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 01:35 PM

Determining when a drive making noise will fail is very hard to predict, for about $100 and an hour of your time your issue is fixed and your data is saved.


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#5 bludshot

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 01:45 AM

All situations lead to some sort of blue screen of death.  Is my hard drive really dying?

 

Yes

 

 

If I know that doing the above tasks makes my hard drive click and squeak, does it mean that if I constantly try to do those tasks, my hard drive will die faster

 

 

It will die faster, yes.

 

 

Most of the normal tasks I do on this laptop, the hard drive does not click or squeak loudly, although it means getting rid of malware and viruses may be a tough task.

 

Clicking and squeaking started last year, and my laptop still runs fine.  I anticipate my hard drive dying, but it is still going.  Tell me, is it truly the act of clicking and squeakng that drains the life out of the hard drive, or when you hear some clicks and squeaks,and you don't hear it ever again, your hard drive isn't going to die?

 

Your hard drive might not die any time soon, or it might die tomorrow! This is actually true of all hard drives everywhere even ones that don't make noises (at least when you add in the specter of thunderstorms, etc)

 

Just keep your data backed up frequently, and any especially important bits even more frequently. Then if and when it dies you won't lose much.



#6 signofzeta

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 02:09 AM

I am at a point where if this computer dies, I will move on to my windows 8 laptop I purchased a month ago.  Using this computer more just means that I am extending the life of my windows 8 laptop because I am not using that one.  A sad thing is that if this computer dies, I won't have a second computer with a windows OS whose support hasn't ended to test multiplayer features of games with lan capabilities.  Everything on the hard drive has been backed up, and if I lost anything it is no big deal, even though I am attached to them, even if I had so many backup copies.

 

I have to ask one question.  Does running a game non-stop kill the hard drive quicker even if the hard drive wasn't dying?  Is the rate of killing the hard drive and the age of the game correlate with each other?  I am not doing running games non-stop, more like overnight in some days.  I do that to either listen to the music, or in the case of older games, just let the demo loop run.  Sometimes I just play a game, and then fall asleep.  I want to know this so I stop doing it so I can pump out more life out of this dying laptop.


Edited by signofzeta, 13 May 2014 - 02:38 AM.


#7 mjd420nova

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:07 AM

All things mechanical have a limited life time.  With hard drives, mechanisms get sloppy and loose.  Constant motion of head Servos will certainly create a shorter life.  There are certain spots on most haed drives where the head servo is moving and its vibration mixes with the spinning platter vibration and you can get clicks, squeaks, squeals and chirps.  Hopefully any clicks are not the heads contacting the platter but this may be the case.  If the innermost track (clock track) gets corrupted, nothing will be seen by the controller on the drive.  Head crashed will also damage the head and cause intermittent read and write errors..



#8 signofzeta

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:31 AM

I don't know if this will help me much, but do you know any computer shops that diagnose your hard drive for free?  That is, look to see if there are problems, but not fix anything?  I think the only way to see if my hard drive is really dying is to just bring the computer to a computer store, and as the guy to take a look at the hard drive, but I don't want to spend a single cent on something like that.



#9 hamluis

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 11:00 AM

You don't need to go to computer shop...the long test result for SeaTools from DOS can be accepted as a reliable indicator of functional status of the hard drive.  All you have to do is accept the results for what they are.

 

Louis



#10 signofzeta

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 11:40 AM

You don't need to go to computer shop...the long test result for SeaTools from DOS can be accepted as a reliable indicator of functional status of the hard drive.  All you have to do is accept the results for what they are.

 

Louis

 

I was told to use Seatools for dos to test my hard drive in one of the threads.  My response was that it didn't work.  Something about "unable to load BCDW.ini".






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