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Potentially Unwanted and Unsafe Applications on ESET antivirus


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#1 JoeWatson

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 09:43 PM

I am attaching the detected threats log files from  ESET antivirus scans. ESET state that there are no infections on my computer.

 

My computer has slowed down and I think that it's because of the Potentiallt Unwanted and Unsafe Applictions (PUAs) as shown in the log file.

 

I have checked on my control panel and there are no softwares which I don't recognise.

 

Is there a way to manually delete the PUAs from my computer and would this bring my computer back to normal.

 

I have attached the Detected Threats log file.Attached File  detected threats.txt   45.31KB   5 downloads


Edited by Orange Blossom, 27 April 2014 - 01:50 AM.
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#2 cat1092

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 11:24 PM

I've checked that log out & you need to scan with a more powerful tool.

 

Do you have Malwarebytes (MBAM) Free installed? If not, download, install & update it, then run a Custom Scan (this is the only way to scan all drives, be sure to place a check mark in all). Make sure that in the Advanced options, scan for rootkits, quarantine all threats automatically & scan within archives are selected.

 

https://www.malwarebytes.org/free/

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 czarboom

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 04:32 AM

I agree, but if you think your infected do the following to get you to the right place and with the right people

Go to the malware forum on our site. 

  • You do this by first going here, to read how to post and where, what and when.
  •  Then follow the post link to post to our virus forum.
  • Please wait, do not do anything to your computer unless a forum, Malware expert, or Moderator tells you too.
  • They will make sure your computer has no virus, malware on it, and help you secure your computer.

    Only work with one person at a time, DO NOT go to different sites and get help there too.


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#4 JoeWatson

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 05:18 AM

@czarboom

 

I had already started a scan of my drives with Malawarebytes but it is going to take a long time to complete. In view of your comments should I stop this scan and start again following the steps in your post?



#5 czarboom

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 05:45 AM

yes.

I would do the steps and connect with the guys in the malware forum to get the right help


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#6 xXToffeeXx

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 06:14 AM

Hi,

 

The detections are for an old tool (SmitFraudFix) and in the system restore points folder on your E and D drivers. They are not dangerous to you in the system restore point location unless you restore your computer using an old restore point. SmitFraudFix is not dangerous, but it's an old tool which is no longer updated so there are better ones you should be using now.

 

xXToffeeXx


Edited by xXToffeeXx, 27 April 2014 - 06:47 AM.

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#7 quietman7

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 08:26 AM


What are Potentially Unsafe Applications?

There are many legitimate programs that serve to simplify the administration of networked computers. However, in the wrong hands, they may be misused for malicious purposes. This is why ESET has created this special category. ESET users now have the option to choose whether the antivirus system should or should not detect such threats."Potentially unsafe applications" is the classification used for commercial, legitimate software. This classification includes programs such as remote access tools, password-cracking applications and key-loggers (a program recording each keystroke a user types).

Eset: Potentially unsafe applications
Eset Online Scanner FAQs #16: What are Potentially Unsafe Applications?


What is a potentially unwanted application?

A potentially unwanted application is a program that contains adware, installs toolbars or has other unclear objectives. There are some situations where a user may feel that the benefits of a potentially unwanted application outweigh the risks. For this reason, ESET assigns such applications a lower-risk category compared to other types of malicious software, such as trojan horses or worms.

Eset: Potentially Unwanted Application

What are Potentially Unwanted Applications?

Potentially Unwanted Applications are programs that are not necessarily malicious, but may affect the performance, reliability or behavior of your computer. Such applications usually require consent for installation. Often computers will function differently after Potentially Unwanted Applications have been installed.

Eset Online Scanner FAQs #15: What are Potentially Unwanted Applications?


A Potentially Unwanted Program (PUP) is a very broad threat category which can encompass any number of different programs to include those which are benign as well as problematic. Thus, this type of detection does not always necessarily mean the file is malicious or a bad program. PUPs in and of themselves are not always bad...many are generally known, non-malicious but unwanted software usually containing Adware or bundled with other free third-party software to include toolbars, add-ons/plug-ins and browser extensions. PUPs are considered unwanted because they can cause undesirable system performance or other problems and are sometimes installed without the user's consent since they are often included when downloading legitimate programs. PUPs may also be defined somewhat differently by various security vendors and may or may not be detected/removed based on that definition. That fact adds to confusion and a lot of complaints from end users asking why a detection was not made on a particular file (program) they are having issues with.

To learn more about PUPs and how you get them, please read: About those Toolbars and Add-ons - Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs)
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#8 cat1092

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 12:57 AM

 

A Potentially Unwanted Program (PUP) is a very broad threat category which can encompass any number of different programs to include those which are benign as well as problematic. Thus, this type of detection does not always necessarily mean the file is malicious or a bad program. PUPs in and of themselves are not always bad...many are generally known, non-malicious but unwanted software usually containing Adware or bundled with other free third-party software to include toolbars, add-ons/plug-ins and browser extensions. PUPs are considered unwanted because they can cause undesirable system performance or other problems and are sometimes installed without the user's consent since they are often included when downloading legitimate programs. PUPs may also be defined somewhat differently by various security vendors and may or may not be detected/removed based on that definition. That fact adds to confusion and a lot of complaints from end users asking why a detection was not made on a particular file (program) they are having issues with.

This is one of the main reasons why we should make sure, not limited to but especially when installing free software, to take it slow, read the EULA & uncheck any boxes (or click "I do not agree" if no check box is there) that offers other 3rd party software. Most of these are PUP's & how a lot of junk software can accumulate on a computer.

 

Also, this makes a good case for MBAM Pro to be installed, as this will catch a lot of this crap & give the user the chance to quarantine any threats, many as they're downloaded. There are still Lifetime licenses of MBAM Pro on the Newegg site, often on promo, one simply has to sign up on their site to receive email offerings. I've never paid more than $16 for MBAM Pro Lifetime & keep two extra copies just in case & will likely grab one more before they're all gone.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 quietman7

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 06:45 AM

Yes, folks need to take their time during installation of any program and read everything on the screen before clicking that "Install" or "Next" button. Look for and read the End User's License Agreement (EULA) carefully as well as any other related documentation.

Folks need to take some personal responsibility and educate themselves about the practice of bundling software.
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#10 Queen-Evie

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 12:06 PM

Since you have posted logs here http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/532519/potentially-unwantedunsafe-applications-on-eset-antivirus-and-possible-malaware/ in Malware Removal Logs, this topic is closed.






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