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Restore points disppear


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#1 jmcgoo

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 08:24 PM

I create restore a point with Tweaking, or with Control Panel|sytem|restore and tomorrow it's
 gone.  What's going on here?  sad.pngsad.png I set it up to create one every time a new program is installed.
It too vanishes.  I don't know where Tweaking stores its restore points.    I use Malabytes but it doesn't help.
  When I first wrote this, there were two restore points.  Just checked; there are none.  How do I stop this deleting of restore points?



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#2 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:33 PM

Restore points are stored on each protected drive, in a hidden folder, off the root called "System Volume Information".  How long they stay depends on how much space you have reserved for them.

I haven't heard of "Tweaking", if that's a program.  I don't use restore points, because my testing proves it isn't as reliable as people think, but that's up to the individual.

Now, this is just a guess, because, as I said, I don't use restore points.  Do you use any cleaning software (e.g. CCleaner) that might delete registry entries, presuming that the registry is also used to save restore point info.

I don't know if all the restore point metadata (e.g. basic info) is all stored in "System Volume Information", the registry, or a combination of those or other places.

BEST OF LUCK.



#3 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 05:00 AM

Hi

 

Some third party defrag programs are known to delete restore points so uninstall if there is any. Also dual booting XP and 7 may result in losing "Win 7" restore points in some cases.

 

Tweaking.com Registry Backup only backup the registry hive files ( which will be helpful in some situations ). Usually it will store the backups in C:\RegBackup folder. You can find more details from the blow link.

 

http://www.tweaking.com/articles/pages/tweaking_com_registry_backup_online_help,3.html

 

Although both "System Restore Points" and "Registry" backups are somewhat helpful, imaging your "C" partition is the best and guaranteed way to restore Windows in the event of a catastrophic OS failure. You can use either built in "Windows Backup" or free third party programs like "Macrium Reflect" to do the job.  I prefer "Macrium" as it is free for home use and allow you to create compressed backups so requires considerably less storage space than "Windows Backup". Also it is a lot faster in creating and restoring images.

 

http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx

 

 

 


Edited by Anshad Edavana, 26 April 2014 - 05:04 AM.


#4 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 12:17 PM

Anshad Edavana:

 

I agree with your comments about imaging.  When I build my computer, I use an imaging program at specific points in the process (currently 9), to insure that I have a pristine image.  So if something happens, I can fall back to point X, Y, or Z.  After these pristine images are made, I use a program I wrote to back programs up into ZIP files.
 



#5 jmcgoo

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 12:27 PM

I'm not really interested in where the restore files are saved as long as I can use them.  Tweaking.com - their all-in-one program is really thorough - does not seem to have a restore program to use the restore points created that I can find so I was wondering.  Perhaps it saves the restore points where Win puts them and you can use them thru the Win restore.

 

But I can't have my restore points erased every time I boot.  I saw something in a help file that said his should be on and that should be off - or the like - to prevent this, but can't find it again.  Help.



#6 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 02:05 PM

As "Anshad Edavana" said, "Some third party defrag programs are known to delete restore points so uninstall if there is any".  I would say it more generic, and not say isolate it to just defrag programs, but the principle is the same.

If someone knows that the restore points are saved in "System Volume Information", then they MIGHT BE ABLE TO track down the program that's causing the problem, by looking at the configuration parameters.

If you search for "monitor file access" or something similiar, you should be able to find acceptable software that will help you determine what's going on.

Apr 26 14:42 NOTEPAD.EXE-2A989C54.pf 36.4 KB C:\WINDOWS\Prefetch .pf
Apr 26 14:42 Create + Document1.txt - C:\TEMP .txt
Apr 26 14:42 Document1.txt 14 B C:\TEMP .txt
Apr 26 14:42 Delete - Document1.txt - C:\TEMP .txt

The above was provied by a friend, but I won't say the software name, because I can't verify the owner's country of origin.

 

BEST OF LUCK.

 



#7 jmcgoo

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 05:02 PM

Thanks for all the ideas guys.

 

I don't believe it is a program causing this.  As I said I came across a passage in the Win Help files which said there were two things that had to be set a certain way to prevent this happening.  I just can't find it again. 



#8 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 05:36 PM

Try this:

 

1.  Get to the control panel, system icon, restore tab.

2.  Disable Restore points on all drives.

3.  Reboot.

4.  Get to the control panel, system icon, restore tab.

5.  Enable Restore points on the drives you want.

6.  Reboot.

7.  Create a couple of restore points.

8.  Monitor your system, and see if the RPs are deleted.

 

GOOD LUCK.


Edited by scotty_ncc1701, 26 April 2014 - 05:38 PM.


#9 Wolverine 7

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 04:53 AM

Have a look at these

 

http://itexpertvoice.com/home/what-to-do-about-missing-windows-7-restore-points/

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/532304/restore-points-disppear/

 

System Restore should be working,and if it isnt its fixable.Its always a good idea to make an image of the system also once everythings working well,Macriums easy to use and very reliable.



#10 Scoop8

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 08:06 AM

Ahshad, good vid links.

 

I also use Macrium (free ver) for periodic full-Imaging and occasional cloning.

 

The benefits are numerous for maintaining a full-HDD imaging/cloning routine:

 

- Protection from HDD failure

- Recovery from Registry edit mistakes or other OS issues and user mistakes

- Recovery from nearly all malicious infections

 

I've used Restore Points a couple of times but I'd rather rely on a complete HDD backup & recovery methodology for full-HDD restoration.  There are occasions where Restore Points won't successfully restore one's PC to a previous point in time.

 

I've test-restored full-HDD Images and cloned HDD's during the last couple of years and haven't encountered any incidents where a restored Image or cloned HDD didn't successfully boot into Windows and run without errors.



#11 scotty_ncc1701

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 08:39 AM

Please excuse the length!

For me, I use imaging software to create pristine images of my "C" drive during the build process, then use "ZIP" files for my regular backups.  I also create a mirror of specific folders on an external hard drive

During the build process, I create images at specific points during the build:

T00A_W8_JUST_ACTIVATED
* Just after W8 was installed, with no changes.
* Just the "C" partition.

T00B_W8_JUST_ACTIVATED_WHOLE_DISK
* Just after W8 was installed, with no changes.
* The whole drive (all partitions -  other than "C" are blank).

T01_W8_BASIC
* Minor settings

T02_W8_BASIC_SETTINGS
* Basic settings I want for windows, etc.
* A few programs, LIKE:
*** My PC Build program.
*** Favorite Text Editor.
*** Themes.

T03_W8_COMODO_AVAST
* Firewall and Antivirus programs.

T04_W8_PDF_PTRS
* PDF Creation software and printers.

T05_W8_WIN_UPD_SETTINGS
* All windows updates.

T06_W8_OFC_(2007)_PRO_OFC_UPD
* Office 2007 and updates.

T07_W8_AMP_APPS
* Webserver.
* MySQL.
* PHP.
* All apps.

T08_W8_DEV_ENV
* Development environment.

T09_W8_DEV_ENV_FF
* Firefox.
* Thunderbird (used as RSS reader).

So let's say that something goes wrong.  I then use the imaging software to apply "T09_W8_DEV_ENV_FF", and then restore my files from my last backup.

Say I want to change browsers completely, I then use the imaging software to apply "T08_W8_DEV_ENV", install the new browser, and Thunderbird, reimage it, then restore my files.

Just uninstalling and installing software isn't acceptable to me.  You don't know what things are really left behind.  Earlier this year, I performed some tests, when I installed Windows 8.  What I did was:

1.  I dumped the registry.
2.  Created a file list before I installed a program.
3.  Installed the program.
4.  Ran it (but made no changes to the config).
5.  Dumped the registry.
6.  Created a file list.
7.  Uninstalled the program.
8.  Dumped the registry.
9.  Created a file list.
10.  Compared the registry dumps and file listings.  There were files and registry entries still there, that should have been removed (I'm not talking about "temp" files.
11.  Reset my computer with the fresh, pristine image, and repeated the test with 5 other programs (do the same a total of 5 more times).
12.  The results were the same in each case.  Some were downloaded programs, some were commercial programs (boxed).
13.  I've done the above since Windows XP, and the results were always the same; there were things left behind that shouldn't have been.

PLEASE, DON'T GET ME WRONG!  There's nothing wrong imaging the current drive, even when it is in it's normal operational state.  However having a pristine image is also a smart move.  Let's say you don't make any, or minimal changes to your computer, and something happens.  Also say that you weren't aware of it, and a problem was saved in your last image.  You're just going to keep putting the same problem in place again and again!

However, if you had an image from your last build, and there were minimal, or no changes, then you backup your files, apply the image, restore your files, and you're in business (you'd still have to run Windows updates, Office updates, etc).

On this computer I have (Windows 8), to apply the factory image (depending on my options), it took me about 1.5 to 2.0 hours.  Then I had to install my programs, configure my computer, and restore my files.  Windows updates alone would take up to around 5-6 hours or so (because of my connection speed).

But using the method above, it takes about 30 minutes to restore the image from the imaging software I use, and about another hour to restore all my files (my last backup was around 18GB), and maybe 15 minutes to run Windows and Office updates.  All total:

1.  30 minutes to restore.
2.  15 minutes to run updates, which my that time the Antivirus program as also been updated.
3.  Let my computer restore my files by itself.

So, my system can be restored and basically usable in 45 minutes, with all updates in place.  Then while my files are being restored (I always restore the browser settings, bookmarks, etc first), I then can browse the Internet, etc, while the file restore completes.

During the build process, I will not go out to the Internet, on the computer I'm building, unless it is absolutely necessary, until I'm done.  If I have to, I use my desktop computer, download the files there, then transfer them over via my home network, after they've been scanned for viruses, etc.  In this way, I know the programs are virus free.  I also run defrag software at the end of each step above, but before I image the computer.

Since the build process can take a bit, if I'm waiting for my main computer to do something (e.g. download updates), I use the desktop to browse the Internet, type letters, etc.  When I'm done, I then copy the files from the desktop, to my main computer, if necessary

I have no doubts, that some people might not want to take the additional steps that I do, and that's fine.  But I thought I'd mention it, because of some of the posts I've seen in this forum.  I figured, it might give others another option.

Have a great day, and if you're in the Midwest to eastern US, stay dry, and hope you weren't affected, or affected much, by the storms.

 






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