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Are there any more CD/DVD clubs?


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#1 cat1092

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 12:22 AM

What has happened? Back in the 90's & early 2000's, there were record clubs, where one could get up to 12 CD's (or cassettes) for a penny, under the condition that a few more were bought in a year's time. I collected many CD's in this manner over a 5-6 year time frame. Some consumers, I know ripped them off, never to buy anything, but I always met my committments.

 

Long story short, I allowed a relative to check out my basket of CD/DVD's, when I went to get them back, he told me they were stolen. It was true that his apartment was broke into, because his stereo, TV, desktop PC & netbook were stolen. Thing was his insurance paid for his stuff, but not mine.

 

However, I don't blame him, I blame myself. I should have known that my music collection was irreplaceable & not loaned them out, especially the entire storage basket of them in one shot. After all, I wouldn't loan any of my computers or car out. A couple of these cost over $40 & this was in the 90's.

 

Does anyone know of anymore such clubs similar to Columbia House/BMG? Everything that I run across leads me to rentals, or to Amazon, where some of the CD's aren't the originals, they've been remastered between the years of 2009-2012. I've heard some of these on MySpace & they're not the same. What was the purpose of remastering, for them to work with 7.1 channel sound cards?

 

One of my all time favorites, Pink Floyd (The Wall) is also remastered.

 

Has the entire music industry gone to renting, rather than ownership?

 

Cat

 

 

 

 


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#2 TsVk!

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 11:43 PM

Yes, it would indeed appear that the most popular form of listening is renting music these days. Mostly renting from DRM mega-companies... (cough)

 

Even if you do download high quality recordings that you pay for, you will often find the quality is not what it was. In audio quality terms cassette tape was a step down from vinyl, as CD's were a step down from audio cassette. Now the quality is in general free-fall with digital compression, and most audiophiles are disgusted. Dynamic range is a joke that modern producers laugh about... things have changed so much.

 

Feel free to hunt down your favourite CD's again online if you feel the need, you can find anything here these days B)



#3 TsVk!

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 12:01 AM

PS: here's a good copy of The Wall. 20 years old but still like new in the box...

 

I paid a hell of a lot more for one of these many years ago.



#4 cat1092

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 01:33 AM

Thanks for posting back on what may have been my first topic on the site, TsVk!  :thumbup2:

 

Just so happened, my sister's husband gave me that one, the same Columbia House edition that I had, along with a few others. 

 

My wife bought the one that was stolen for Christmas in the late 90's & like you said, it was 3x the price (over $30) & hard to find. Believe it was at a local KMart where it was found, most music stores were sold out. This one, I couldn't get through a music club. 

 

It's unlikely that I'll ever come close to having such a collection again, but have found a good place to listen to music free in MySpace. I don't care about the social aspect of the site, just listen to the music, all of that is remastered too. 

 

Yes, I remember that cassettes were a step down from vinyl, as were 8-Track recordings, which were widespread in the 70's. I believe that cassettes replaced the 8-Track. And the more the tapes were played, the worse they got. CD's, I knew that some of these were remastered, but from the late 80's on, CD's were the thing. The one quality they had over the tapes was zero wear, could be played hundreds of times with no degrading. Only one I had got a skip in it & believe that came from going too fast over a railroad track too fast while playing it. 

 

Not only has the quality of the recordings went down, so has some of the brands of speakers. Polk Audio, which once were one of my favorites, has became a holding company & the reviews are showing it, they're no longer top rated. These, I used to install in my rides, back in my younger years. 

 

I don't believe that music will ever be the same as we once knew it back in the days. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 TsVk!

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 05:51 PM

I was looking for a different Cat, but ended up reading your posts...

 

It's nice to find a Mint enthusiast. When I discovered it mid last year I instantly saw how easy it could be for the non-nerds in my household to pick up. Now all the kids and the missus are on it...

 

What the remastering about is perceived loudness.  In 2005 and before, sound engineers were looking to increase and preserve dynamic range whilst making the overall image as loud as possible. With the onset of mainstream VST support suddenly everyone could have their own music studio at home. What they were missing is the expensive equipment. Sounds great right? In some ways it is, but in another way no. The speakers they were mastering on were low quality (compared to mastering studios) and the whole sound of available music changed overnight. Now every track is limited and compressed in a way that only TV ads were beforehand. Dynamic range (the difference between the loudest sound signal and the quietest, the perceivable depth of the track)  has been crushed to a narrow band of sameness in the war to create the loudest master. Bigger is better right? so louder must be too.

 

Our older works of art and audio engineering aren't 'loud' enough by todays standards, where in fact they are... but the commercial war says no.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 10:48 PM

 

 

It's nice to find a Mint enthusiast. When I discovered it mid last year I instantly saw how easy it could be for the non-nerds in my household to pick up. Now all the kids and the missus are on it...

 

That is fantastic & sweet music to hear in itself! :guitar:

 

Worth the creation of the thread to hear about.  :bounce:

 

And chances are, none of them has dealt with any infection of the OS. 

 

All it takes is a little willingness to learn & one can do most anything on Linux Mint 17 as Windows 7, just that the names of the software choices are different. And a lot to choose from. 

 

Oh, and the music sounds just as good on Linux Mint as it did on the out of the box OS, Windows 8. Have used the OS since 2009, yes there was a curve at first, but nothing like Windows 8. No I don't know it all & likely never will, but should I need to learn a new feature, that's no problem. Will jump in there & learn. One doesn't have to be a "guru" to run Linux. 

 

But I still don't like the remastered music. It wasn't meant to be heard that way, with the enhancements & all. No doubt, some of my "original" CD's were enhanced. Back in the days of Jim Morrison & the Doors (another of my favorites), CD's may have been a fantasy, if that, in some developer's mind. 

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 TsVk!

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 12:07 AM

Hey Cat,

 

This thread has turned into a great thing, very nice to meet you.

 

Of course you don't like the newly mastered music, they have compressed and limited the life out of it. (dynamic range). Enhancement when a piece of music is created is part of the creation, I was a studio sound engineer for many many years, I know. When music is revisited and non-period enhancements are added it destroys the authenticity of it IMHO. If you knew the old piece you would instantly spot it as a fake.

 

I'm a Debian user, which despite my best efforts the rest of the family would not adopt. Mint was the perfect solution to move them over to Linux. No more drama, no more Windows... Mint has been an ease of use gift for my home. Coming from Debian (Mints grandaddy distro) it has presented 0 issues. Works perfect out of the box. Love the Cinnamon desktop too.

 

Cheers

 

TsVk!

 

ps: digital music sounds the same on every OS, it is the soundcard that counts.



#8 boopme

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 12:43 PM

For what it's worth I hope PONO takes off.. It will be a huge improvement to music.

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#9 TsVk!

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 05:11 PM

It's just hype... CD quality is still CD quality no matter how you label it. Unless suddenly mastering companies start rendering 24bit digital... at a minimum of about 100mb per 6 mins.

 

All the "features" of the product are just what you'd want from a good digital music player. There's nothing new. Not saying the product doesn't look good, but my minidisk player from 10 years ago does the same thing.

 

This is a case of the emperors new clothes.






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