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Word 2007 is tiling by default


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#1 godzilla1347

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 05:24 PM

I have been using Word 2000 on my XP computer and just got my brother-in-law's Vista computer. I copied my word files over to a folder on the Vista computer and when I open up word documents, the document pages are tiling instead of simply showing one after another.  In other words, I'm seeing 4 pages on one screen instead of a vertical listing of pages, one below the next that I can scroll to view.  In short, if I go to page 9, page 10 appears to the right instead of below page 9. then page 11 appears directly below page 9.

 

All I want is for the pages to align vertically and numerically like they always have--one page to a screen that I can scroll to the next on vertically.. I can't seem to find a way to do this from the Word 2007 menus.



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#2 smax013

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 12:56 AM

Kind of sounds like a combination of the zoom level and viewing mode.

It sounds like you are in Print Layout view mode and maybe at a zoom level on a big monitor that allows more than one page to be viewed. Print Layout will show you a WYSIWYG (or what I call WYSINNWYG…i.e. What You See Is Not Necessarily What You Get) version of the document that kind of shows each page.

There should be a View tab on the Ribbon (the new way of doing things since Microsoft got ride of menus). If you click on it, then the first section will list the various view modes and the third section will allow you to adjust the zoom settings.

If you want the good old "every things is mushed together, continuous scrolling" mode, then select Draft. That is what you are likely used to seeing.

If you want to keep it in the Print Layout to see individual pages, then you could just zoom in some…how much will depend on the monitor size and screen resolution. For my 24" monitor running at 1920x1200, I tend to zoom in at 150% or maybe even 200% if I want the page to "fill" the full width of the screen. To zoom, you can click on the magnifiying glass icon/button which will give you a Zoom dialog box where you can pick the zoom level or use one of the preset buttons (i.e. One Page, Two Pages, Page Width, 100%).

#3 godzilla1347

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 03:13 AM

Thanks, going to the view menu and clicking on zoom at 100% got it back to normal. I had no idea what it was showing.  I'm used to the menu-driven format from XP and had to bury that machine on 4/8/14 because Microsoft security for XP ended so now I'm using a Vista machine. I hate Vista and hate the ribbon. If I didn't get that message from you, I would have been wasting all kinds of time trying to make sense out of it.



#4 smax013

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 03:58 PM

Glad to help.

A lot of people did not like it when Microsoft introduce the Ribbon with Office 2007 (not technically the "fault" of Vista). Some people get used to it…while some other don't.

This is where I can do a "shameless" Mac plug <grin>…the Mac version of Office still has menus as well as a version of the Ribbon.   :bananas:

Of course, if my "shameless" Mac plug worked and convinced you to switch, then you would have way more "new" things to learn than just the Ribbon, so I am not anyway serious.   :smilers:

To re-engage my serious side, give it some time. You will likely get used to how the Ribbon works. In many ways, it makes doing most things that most people do rather easy. It is more the lesser used functions of Word (or Excel or PowerPoint) that take some work to figure out because those functions that used to be "buried" in the menus are now "buried" else where.

And of course, if you can't figure something out with Office 2007, you can always come back here and ask! And I promise, no more "shameless" Mac plugs!   :wink:



#5 godzilla1347

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 08:31 PM

Actually, if I were starting from scratch right now, I would be doing Mac or Linux.  However, I have too much M$ skin in the game.

 

The worst thing with computers is "You don't know what you don't know."  They are intuitive only after you've learned quite a bit. If a new user starts now, he or she doesn't see a Start button that says "start," and without instruction, will be running around the Internet trying to get to first base.

 

I'm in the energy industry and I take it for granted when mentioning inverters or REC's. No one on the planet who's not in my industry has a clue what I'm talking about no matter how intelligent they are because it's not about intelligence but learning building blocks.

 

I was certified for NT4, then came Win2000, XP, Win7 and now Win8 with Win9 coming next June. If I looked under the hood today, I wouldn't know where the engine was. I gave up M$ as a livlihood when I had realized I would have to be doing the equivalence of getting a Ph.D every time a new operating system came out (and my job like so many others was outsourced). Now they're coming out every 2 years and it's insane!  Having a Ph.D, I think it's harder to pass Microsoft Certifications for MCSE  and it's not even that--your basic blah Ph.D is only done once.

 

I'm all for progress but not for progress' sake.  Personally, XP was all I would ever have needed in my lifetime. When I was forced to move over to my Vista computer and make my XP computer into a doorstop because  XP  security updates stopped 4/8/14  and it would have cost me more in upgrades, programs, memory and cards (as per Windows 7 Advisor) than a new computer, which would still be better no matter how much I fed the dinosaur, I had erroneously assumed that Vista et al would be a simple transition. As you can see by my first post, it's anything but. One's migrational success is relative to how much he/she knows.

 

Even the help menus are frustrating. They send you to a plethora of internet sites where it's often hard to find your specific topic.

 

Fortunately, there's BC and I'm impressed how much help I've received here.



#6 smax013

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 04:19 PM

I had erroneously assumed that Vista et al would be a simple transition.


Vista itself should be an fairly easy transition. While it has different looking graphics, it many ways it not really all that different from XP. The difference you are encountering with this specific problem is due to changes in MS Office, not Vista.

And FWIW, you should be able to run Office 2000 on Vista if memory serves if you really want. There might some security issues, but depending on what you use it for, it might not be that much of an issue.




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