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Power surge,computer won't boot


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9 replies to this topic

#1 usernane789

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 06:26 PM

Power surge killed computer,It won't turn on.
Surge protector didn't help.Board power led comes
on.
Board asus M4a78t-e
Power antec Ea-650
win 7

Which troubleshooting steps should I be taking.I'm
familiar with assembling parts to build a computer
but I do not have much experience troubleshooting.
I have a good power supply that I can swap in.Can
I do this without risk of damage to the new power
supply.If I can find a working computer to swap
around parts do I risk damaging the new computer.



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#2 technonymous

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 08:14 PM

Power surge can hurt lots of things. Try unplugging the cord from the PSU for a minute.



#3 usernane789

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 08:49 PM

Thank You, that worked,I appreciate the help
Are there any tests I should do,the surge was
strong enough trip surge protecters in two
different places.I am thinking the surge protecters
sacrificed themselves so that my toys would live.I
plan to buy new ones,is this recomended.



#4 technonymous

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 10:13 PM

Uhh boy that's concerning, I would be looking into why the surges. Was it a storm? Yes it's good practice to replace it after a large power surge. Some have a breaker in them and it has to be reset. Definitly go with a brand that has a guarantee. Generally if no power runs through the strip then it's scrap. The computers PSU itself has some fused protection as well. The circuitry inside detects the surge and cuts off. Don't get power surge protectors and GFCI (ground fault circuit interupters) confused. Surge protectors do pass some high voltages before it kicks and are meant to protect electronics only. They do not protect from a person getting electricuted. A GFCI will give that protection and any circuit connected to it. There is also other special AFCI (arcing fault circuit interupter). Some units now today may be able to detect both GFCI/AFCI. Typically a GFCI is near water like in a kitchen, batheroom, under sink, outside outlet, wash room, hot water heater. However they are still good to have anywhere especially in a childs room and they are tamper proof can't jam stuff in them.


Edited by technonymous, 16 April 2014 - 10:14 PM.


#5 hamluis

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 12:52 PM

After such a power surge...it's a good idea to run the chkdsk /r command on the Windows partition.

 

Louis



#6 mjd420nova

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 10:08 AM

Yes, many of the surge protectors are sacrificial elements, meant to open or disrupt the current during an event and usually will not work afterwards.  Replacement is needed to insure continued protection.  Surges can do serious damage but are usually confined to the power supply so that would be the first step.



#7 usernane789

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 09:41 PM

Sorry I was gone for so long.It wasn't weather related,
It happened on a nice clear day.I haven't found out the
cause yet.This was the second surge on these protectors
that I know about.

I ran chkdsk on all my disks yesterday,everything seems
ok

I bought two new surge protectors and got rid of the old

ones.Hopefully no more issues crop up.



#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 09:48 PM

If you have the budget for it, I would recommend you use a UPS instead of a simple surge protector. Preferably one with automatic voltage regulation.



#9 mjd420nova

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 10:05 AM

This does present a problem in surge prone areas that calls for maybe both surge protection AND a UPS  to provide backup.  Unfortunately, most surge protection circuits consist of sacrificial elements designed to destrot themselves to open the circuit in an excursion event.  I'd put a large surge protector ahead of a UPS unit to provide full protection.  Far better to fry a surge unit that a UPS.



#10 OldPhil

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 12:29 PM

If you have the budget for it, I would recommend you use a UPS instead of a simple surge protector. Preferably one with automatic voltage regulation.

+1 on buying a UPS!!!  It is very risky running without one, you are very luck the surge protectors worked in many cases they are not worth spit!


Honesty & Integrity Above All!





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