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XP starts to boot then screen goes black Part2


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#1 PeterP11c

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 05:58 PM

Hello,

My name is PeterP11c and I am a new member on this forum. Recently, my Gateway 710XL with Windows XP SP3, began to act up, going into boot and screen turning black. This problem had been already a topic of discussion in February 2012, so I don't want to repeat the whole story. Question #1: Were you able to advise Fred93 on a successful fix for this issue. I lean towards replacing the motherboard, which I got at Amazon.com. Please advise on the matter.

Thank you,

PeterP11c



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:34 PM

First of all - welcome to BC!

 

What version of XP do you have? Retail or OEM? If you have a retail version you will have no problem re-installing XP on a new motherboard, if you have an OEM version and you fit a new motherboard, MS may consider it a new computer and refuse to authenticate your copy. If they agree that it is a 'repair', they will normally allow you to do this but you would be best to determine whether or not it is your mobo at fault, and speak to MS before you put a new one in.

 

I tracked down the topic you referred to by Fred93 and it unhappily tails off without any definite resolution reported. In my experience, problems like this are generally caused by either hard drive problems or video problems.

 

Have you checked your hard drive for any potential problems? The Seagate HD tools for DOS test disc is as good a tester as any, unless you know that you have a drive from a different maker. In which case download and burn their equivalent test disc. Back up your data first if at all possible.

 

In Fred93's topic there were suggestions that there might also be a problem with his on-board video, that it worked with generic Windows drivers but not with the manufacturer's drivers. Rather than dumping the mobo, a solution to this problem - if your problem is caused by the on-board graphics - might be to see if you can get a video card to fit into your computer and use the video / graphics via that. Given the apparent age of your computer this might be a problem, but you could always have a look on e-bay.

 

Another factor for you to think about is, given the age of this machine, is it worth spending time and money on? They appear to have been built about 2003 / 2004 which is a good age for a computer. Even if money is tight, you can get an ex-lease machine relatively cheaply and it would be newer than your present one.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 PeterP11c

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:59 PM

Hello,

In those days, Gateway supplied buyers with a whole array of CD's of OEM pre-installed software. I kept them all including XP SP1.3 originally installed on it. Presently, I got SP3 due to continuous updates by MS over time. This particular desktop underwent replacement of motherboard back in 2008, when I experienced similar shutdowns. Got to repair it, including mobo and even graphic card if necessary. Found same one on Amazon.com and already acquired an identical model of a motherboard. Any other option is not feasible at this moment, cause I have a lot of special software in it and most is in 32 bit system.

Funny thing though. When I started in Safe Mode, it worked fine, then in normal Mode rolled back video card drivers, started OK, but was too slow and hung up quickly. No system restore to previous dates worked for me. Additionally, the boot screen (black with white fonts) showed text corruption, like the word "Configuration" was 'Coldupapim", "Drivers" were "Driters" and graphic card showed model 5400 instead of 7600GS. XP start up page also carried vertical lines spread 05. inches apart. Could it be graphic card failure?



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 05:16 PM

It could indeed be a graphic card problem. If you are using an 'add-on' graphics card, try unplugging it and just using the onboard video to see if that improves things. Or go the other way - if you are using onboard graphics, try plugging a separate graphics card in.

 

Most 32 bit software will run on Win 7. Another option for you to consider is a Win 7 computer with a virtual machine running inside it. If you can classify yourself as a 'private' user it might be worth your while looking at VMWare's free VM. I experimented with it briefly - the object was to get some very old games, written for Win 95, to run on a 64 bit Win 7 machine. The games didn't work well, very low frame rates, but some really ancient CAD software flew in the VM. You could always set up XP to run in the VM.

 

It is not that I am a propogandist for MS. but I still think you have to ask yourself how much effort is it worth putting into a computer this old?

 

Chris Cosgrove






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