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Scientific Notation


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#1 biferi

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 04:32 PM

I need some help with Scientific Notation.

 

If you see a number 2,000,000 you can show it as 2x10 to the power of 6

If you see a number 6,400,000 you can show it as 4.40x10 to the power of 6

 

And yes I know we are moving the Point all the way to the Left and placing it after the First number.

 

But if we see the number 22,000,000 we show it as 22x10 to the power of 6

If we are moving the Point all the way to the Left and putting it right after the first number should we not show it as 2.2x10 to the power of 6?

 

 



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#2 Guest_JWebb_*

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 07:55 PM

High school teachers told me this would be relevant in later life.

 

This is the first time in over 30 years I have seen or heard the term "scientific notation";



#3 xXToffeeXx

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 06:27 AM

If you see a number 6,400,000 you can show it as 4.40x10 to the power of 6

Well, it would be 6.4x10actually, no need for the extra zero and I'm guessing 4.4 was a mistake.

 

But if we see the number 22,000,000 we show it as 22x10 to the power of 6

If we are moving the Point all the way to the Left and putting it right after the first number should we not show it as 2.2x10 to the power of 6?

No, if it's shown like that then it is not proper scientific notation. Think of it as 2.2 x 10000000 which is the same as 2.2x107.

The first number; 2.2, is called the coefficient. It must be greater than or equal to 1 and less than 10.

 

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Edited by xXToffeeXx, 11 April 2014 - 06:27 AM.

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#4 NickAu

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 06:33 AM

High school teachers told me this would be relevant in later life.

 

This is the first time in over 30 years I have seen or heard the term "scientific notation";

+1

 

And how am I going to put this to use in real life. :hysterical:


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#5 ddeerrff

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 01:20 PM

Toffee tells it like it is. 

 

Just to confuse the matter a bit, there is also 'Engineering notation'.  For Engineering notation, you want the coefficient between 1 and 1000, and the exponent a multiple of 3.  Those multiples of 3 correspond to the prefixes - pico, nano, micro, milli - kilo, mega, giga etc.


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