Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Failing hard drive- Can I Image my recovery partition and make it bootable?


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 trickshot63

trickshot63

  • Members
  • 52 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:29 PM

Posted 10 April 2014 - 03:25 PM

Can I Image my recovery partition and copy it to a new hard drive, and run it somehow? If so how, and what program should I use? I was thinking Macrium Reflect Free. Thanks for your help.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,082 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:01:29 PM

Posted 10 April 2014 - 06:11 PM

Any program that clones a given hard drive...leaves an exact image of the drive on the second drive.  Whatever partitions/files the cloned drive contains...the new drive will also have.

 

Louis

 

If the drive is failing...a successful cloned image/copy may not be possible. 


Edited by hamluis, 10 April 2014 - 06:15 PM.


#3 trickshot63

trickshot63
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 52 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:29 PM

Posted 10 April 2014 - 06:23 PM

I'm still able to access the drive and use it at the moment. What I'm asking is, can I clone (or whatever) only the recovery partition of the failing drive, and put it on a new hard drive, and access it somehow to create a complete factory restore on the new hard drive?



#4 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,283 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:29 PM

Posted 10 April 2014 - 07:09 PM

I don't believe that will work. If you just clone the recovery partition, you will no longer be able to use the key sequence to start the factory restore at boot.  I would clone the whole drive. Then use the key sequence to do a factory restore but because your hard drive is failing, there is a slight chance it will not work.

 

I have seen where you can start the factory restore partition by giving it a boot flag with a Gparted Live CD but that does not always work.



#5 trickshot63

trickshot63
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 52 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:29 PM

Posted 10 April 2014 - 07:25 PM

Thanks guys, I really appreciate the help.



#6 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 24,283 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:29 PM

Posted 10 April 2014 - 07:32 PM

I believe it would be best to clone to a drive that is the same size. Sometimes the factory reset partiton is referenced to a particular sector location on the hard drive. If you clone to a larger drive and then expand the partition, the sector location is lost and you would not be able to get the factory reset to work. This is just my opinion.

 

Edit: you could try cloning to a larger drive but I would do nothing to the partition locations. Then I would do the factory reset. After the reset and everything is working okay, I would then expand the partitions  and then do a drive image with a program like Macrium Reflect free that lets you create a bootable disk that can recover your image to new drive or back to the same drive if you get a malware infection that cannot be cleaned.


Edited by JohnC_21, 10 April 2014 - 07:35 PM.


#7 technonymous

technonymous

  • Members
  • 2,498 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:29 AM

Posted 11 April 2014 - 12:46 AM

That software being free may be able to clone, but leave out vital critical options that you need. Be sure to double check that it isn't just making a image and actually including the partition structure. Like for instance the hidden reserve partition. There is a difference between backup and Full backup.

 

Edit: Oh and sometimes a new drive you buy will have imaging software powered by true image. Shop around a bit and look over the forums and see if you can get one that has a cd with it, usually people will mention that on the forum like newgg.com.

 

Good luck


Edited by technonymous, 11 April 2014 - 12:51 AM.


#8 trickshot63

trickshot63
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 52 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:29 PM

Posted 11 April 2014 - 12:59 AM

Ok guys This is what I want to do. I have downloaded Macrium Reflect Free. I have removed the failing hard drive from the laptop and put it in an enclosure (because my pc is faster than the laptop) and Macrium is detecting it. I'm gonna clone the entire failing drive and clone it to a new drive. BUT, does the new drive have to be formatted or partitioned before the failing drive image can be cloned to it? If so how do I go about that? I am a true novice to cloning/imaging and such, so thanks for being patient with me.


Edited by trickshot63, 11 April 2014 - 01:49 AM.


#9 technonymous

technonymous

  • Members
  • 2,498 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:29 AM

Posted 11 April 2014 - 03:17 AM

Ok guys This is what I want to do. I have downloaded Macrium Reflect Free. I have removed the failing hard drive from the laptop and put it in an enclosure (because my pc is faster than the laptop) and Macrium is detecting it. I'm gonna clone the entire failing drive and clone it to a new drive. BUT, does the new drive have to be formatted or partitioned before the failing drive image can be cloned to it? If so how do I go about that? I am a true novice to cloning/imaging and such, so thanks for being patient with me.

Well the usb enclosure the file transfer will be considerably slower than connecting the drive to a sata/ide controller on the motherboard. As far as formatting I never had to. The program will handle all that all you need is a bowl of popcorn. :)



#10 trickshot63

trickshot63
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 52 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:29 PM

Posted 11 April 2014 - 09:24 AM

Thanks Technonymous, that's good to know!



#11 Scoop8

Scoop8

  • Members
  • 326 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas TX
  • Local time:01:29 PM

Posted 11 April 2014 - 10:35 AM

Good info here. 

 

trickshot63

 

I've been cloning for about 3 years with consistent results, all cloned Target HDD's booting up, full-HDD Image test-restorations all bootable, etc.

 

From reading at this forum and elsewhere, HDD backups appear to be an under-utilized tool which, if widely used on home PC's, would save PC users many hours of aggravation and loss of important personal data.

 

Regarding the cloning (and full-HDD Imaging) processes, as hamluis mentioned, the process copies all data from the Source to the Target HDD, including all file format and partition info, including the MBR.

 

Regarding cloning to a larger HDD, I've cloned from a 500 Gb to a 1 Tb HDD with no issues but I don't have extensive experience with that segment of cloning or imaging. 

 

I clone periodically (about every 2 weeks) with identical-sized HDD's.  As technonymous mentioned, if you're able to clone with Sata to Sata connection, it will speed up the process significantly.

 

If you have a Desktop PC, and have expansion bays available, you might find his item of interest here .  I have 2 of these installed in my Desktop PC.  They save considerable time when cloning or imaging HDD's since they eliminate the requirement to access the internal PC case/tower when installing and removing HDD's.

 

Here is another model that has a front-panel power switch.

 

I use a USB 2.0 Enclosure for my Laptop PC cloning/imaging.  When I clone the Laptop, it takes about 1 Hr 15 minutes with "Acronis" to complete the process.  With my Desktop using Sata III, it takes about 35 minutes.

 

JohnC_21 mentioned the main reason I clone bi-weekly.  It's a fast way to recover from malicious issues with the HDD.  It also provides a shelf-ready plug-and-play HDD replacement in the event of HDD failure or user error (bad download, Registry-edit mistake, etc).

 

Macrium Reflect was mentioned.  I also use that primarily for imaging.  I use "Acronis" (2011 ver) for bi-weekly cloning since I had previously purchased that product a couple of years ago.  It clones faster than Macrium, not sure why though.



#12 trickshot63

trickshot63
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 52 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:29 PM

Posted 27 April 2014 - 11:57 PM

Thanks everyone






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users