Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Dual-boot Windows 8 or Windows 7 and Ubuntu 13.10, with Ubuntu on a btrfs filesy


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 13,827 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:10:29 PM

Posted 06 April 2014 - 12:22 AM

 

This tutorial offers a step-by-step guide on how to dual-boot Windows 8 and Ubuntu 13.10 on a single hard disk drive (HDD), with Ubuntu on a btrfs filesystem.

This dual-boot setup is on a system with Legacy BIOS, that is, non-UEFI and using an MBR disk partitioning scheme, which means that GPT is not involved. Because of this, it can also be used as a guide to dual-boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu 13.10.

GRUB 2, the boot loader used by Ubuntu 13.10, will be installed in the boot partition of Ubuntu and EasyBCD will be used to add an entry for Ubuntu in the Windows boot menu. The result is that the Windows boot manager will be the master boot manager, so that every time the computer is rebooted, you will see this ugly boot menu.

Read More.

http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2014/02/01/dual-boot-windows-8-or-windows-7-and-ubuntu-13-10-with-ubuntu-on-a-btrfs-filesystem/



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:07:29 AM

Posted 06 April 2014 - 12:28 PM

I've been using Easy BCD for a couple of years & it's indeed a good piece of software.

 

The only time that I had an issue with it, was when selecting GRUB instead of GRUB2. Reinstalled 3 times before discovering my mistake.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 helpmepc111

helpmepc111

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:59 PM

Posted 08 April 2014 - 04:52 AM

Does it affect on the speed of the computer if the setup it to the dual boot..???



#4 jonuk76

jonuk76

  • Members
  • 2,182 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, UK
  • Local time:11:29 AM

Posted 08 April 2014 - 05:26 AM

Does it affect on the speed of the computer if the setup it to the dual boot..???

 

It'll add a few seconds to the start up time due to the boot menu where you select which OS to run.  Other than that no, there is no impact on speed - both OS's will run as if they were the only OS on the computer.


7sbvuf-6.png


#5 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:07:29 AM

Posted 14 April 2014 - 05:05 PM

 

Does it affect on the speed of the computer if the setup it to the dual boot..???

Yes, if you're using a regular HDD, Ubuntu will fire up faster. That is because Ubuntu & other versions of Linux doesn't have the overhead that Windows does, such as, security loading & updating, there's no neon circles to watch while you're trying open an app seconds after booted.

 

Linux doesn't need gimmicks such as hybrid sleep (not fully shutdown) to load fast. This is where Windows 8 gets much of it's loading speed, it was never fully shut down to begin with, unless the user disabled these features. SSD users normally does disable these, as recommended.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 Jacob123Micheal

Jacob123Micheal

  • Banned Spammer
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:04:59 PM

Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:36 AM

If you are smoothly working with Windows 7 and don’t know whether to upgrade to Windows 8 or not then dual boot system is the right choice for you. For configuring your PC for dual-boot, you need to create a partition for Windows 8 and install it. But, before doing this make sure to have a complete system backup. Here are some easy steps to follow: 

 

Step 1: Press the shortcut “Win+R” in Windows 7.

Step 2: Next type “diskmgmt.msc” to start Disk Management
Step 3: Shrink the C: volume to make space for Windows 8. In Disk management, right-click your hard drive and choose “Shrink Volume”.
Step 4: Now, select how much space you want to shrink.
Step 5: After completing the shrink task, right-click on unallocated partition and select “New Simple Volume”. Go to “New Simple Volume” wizard and then format the new partition in NTFS and provide it a volume label like “Windows 8”. 
Step 6: Insert the bootable Windows 8 DVD or USB flash drive into your PC and restart it to begin the installation task of Windows 8. 
Step 7: Choose “Custom” when asked to choose the type of installation.
Step 8: Select the new partition which you have created as the location of Windows 8 install.
Step 9: When Windows 8 installation gets finished, you can see the boot menu with both Windows 8 and 7. Windows 8 will start automatically after 30 seconds by default. And, you can set Windows 7 as the default by clicking on “Change defaults or choose other options” from the boot menu.
 


#7 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:07:29 AM

Posted 05 September 2014 - 12:41 AM

Jacob123Micheal,  :welcome: to BC Fourms!

 

I realize your advise is sound & if in the right Topic may be perfect, but this is the Linux forum & what we're dealing with, are those who wants to dual boot Windows 8 or 7 with Ubuntu 13.10. In this case, once you get past this part of Step 5,

 

 

 

 After completing the shrink task

....that's the end of the road as far as a Linux install goes. From there, one needs their Ubuntu 13.10 to finish the job. Ubuntu 13.10, which has now been replaced with Ubuntu 14.04, won't install to a NTFS formatted partition. 

 

Your post is a good one, just in the wrong place. However, many of us has made that mistake, so am not going to be hard on you. 

 

Just one piece of advise. Be sure to read the Topic header (the name of the Topic) & what information the first poster (the OP) provides. I believe you'll be a better poster.  :thumbup2:

 

All the Best,

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users