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RootSudo


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7 replies to this topic

#1 NickAu

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 07:44 PM

 

In Linux (and Unix in general), there is a SuperUser named Root. The Windows equivalent of Root is Administrators group. The SuperUser can do anything and everything, and thus doing daily work as the SuperUser can be dangerous. You could type a command incorrectly and destroy the system. Ideally, you run as a user that has only the privileges needed for the task at hand. In some cases, this is necessarily Root, but most of the time it is a regular user.

Read More here.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo



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#2 helpmepc111

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 04:47 AM

Is this possible to recover root's password if it is lost ???? 

 

Any way to recover this.. It is linux server..



#3 NickAu

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 05:29 PM

I have never tried this but try it out.

 

It happens sometime that you can't remember root password. On Linux, recovering root password can be done by booting Linux under a specific mode: single user mode.
This tutorial will show how to boot Linux in single user mode when using GRUB and finally how to change root password.

 

During normal usage, a Linux OS runs under runlevels between 2 and 5 which corresponds to various multi-user modes. Booting Linux under runlevel 1 will allow one to enter into a specific mode, single user mode. Under such a level, you directly get a root prompt. From there, changing root password is a piece of cake.

1. Entering runlevel 1

Some Linux distribution, such as Ubuntu for instance, offer a specific boot menu entry where it is stated "Recovery Mode" or "Single-User Mode". If this is your case, selecting this menu entry will boot your machine into single user mode, you can carry on with the next part. If not, you might want to read this part.

Using GRUB, you can manually edit the proposed menu entry at boot time. To do so, when GRUB is presenting the menu list (you might need to press ESC first), follow those instructions:

  • use the arrows to select the boot entry you want to modify.
  • press e to edit the entry
  • use the arrows to go to kernel line
  • press e to edit this entry
  • at the end of the line add the word single
  • press ESC to go back to the parent menu
  • press b to boot this kernel

The kernel should be booting as usual (except for the graphical splash screen you might be used to), and you will finally get a root prompt (sh#).

Here we are, we have gained root access to the filesystem, let's finally change the password.

2. Changing root password

As root, changing password does not ask for your old password, therefore running the command:

# passwd

will prompt you for your new password and will ask you to confirm it to make sure there is no typo.

http://www.debuntu.org/how-to-recover-root-password-under-linux-with-single-user-mode/



#4 technonymous

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 11:47 PM

That's also why your server should be under lock and key. Linux assumes whoever has physical access is the owner.



#5 cat1092

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 11:27 PM

That's also why your server should be under lock and key. Linux assumes whoever has physical access is the owner.

Actually one can create password reset CD's for Windows, or if there's ample time & access, these can be reset by anyone who knows what they're doing. No need for me to mention techniques.

 

Any server (or home PC) should be under lock & key, and when practical, other measures used to secure components such as hard drives. There is the option to encrypt the home folder during the Ubuntu install process, which the info in post #3 won't expose.

 

In case anyone wants to know, there's ways to encrypt most any drive or folder, free of charge, with TrueCrypt. This is a Ubuntu tutorial, however it works much the same way with Windows. I use it on several of my Flash drives & is far more reliable than BitLocker (offered for Windows 7 Ultimate/Windows 8 Pro/Enterprise). There was times that I couldn't get into BitLocker protected Flash drives, even with the proper credentials (created passphrase & auto created 64 bit key) on the PC it was created on. True Crypt doesn't depend on a TPM or a 100MB partition in front of an OS to work, so it's far more secure.

 

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/TrueCrypt

 

SuperUser, Root, Sudo or whomever cannot defeat TrueCrypt's protection.

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#6 yu gnomi

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 07:06 PM

I installed Debian "Wheezy" on my hard drive yesterday, so I can now dual boot into Windows or Linux (although the Grub bootloader never got the news that I finished my installation- when I try to boot into Windows it still goes to a next step where I can select either boot Windows (again), or "continue with Debian installation" (which I never pick))

 

I didn't like the Gnome 3 interface that came 'stock' with Debian, so I installed KDE. I had problems getting KDE to start, so I could check it out, because I was ignorant of the fact that you have to log-out and log back in and change the desktop via a button on the log-in widget. So I ended up installing a ton of extra KDE packages, always thinking I needed to install something else to get it to work.

 

When I finally witnessed KDE running on my computer, I thought it made everything sluggish (I have an old machine), and decided to move on to XFCE- which I currently have and am relatively happy with. To make room in my Linux partition, I uninstalled everything Gnome or KDE I could find with Synaptic package manager. I also uninstalled some other stuff I knew I wouldn't need (touchscreen interface, braille interface, wireless stuff and printer stuff (I don't have a printer)).

 

Everything still worked for the most part, but anything that required root permission stopped working unless I ran it from a terminal as a root user. Before I mass-uninstalled all the Gnome/KDE stuff, a window would pop-up prompting me to enter my root password for those actions. I attempted d/l'ng various packages, thinking I had probably uninstalled whatever had been responsible for the pop-up windows, and eventually re-installed gnome 'policy kit' interface package.

 

After logging out and back in again, I once again get a pop-up window prompting me to enter a password to mount a drive, or to access certain programs, but now it only takes my user password for things that once needed my root password, my root password isn't recognized by these pop-up windows. If I access the same program from a terminal, I can do it as a root user. I have no idea why this is, and would like to get things back to how they were initially. Can anyone help me out?

 

I asked this question over at Debian Users Forum (of which I am a new member), and now the site is apparently down- it seems like it was a fairly low traffic site too. Hopefully I have better luck here.


Edited by yu gnomi, 22 April 2014 - 07:18 PM.


#7 rburkartjo

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 07:59 PM

How to reset your password in Ubuntu

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/resetpassword


quote:He that would live in peace & at ease, Must not speak all he knows,nor judge all he sees.'

#8 cat1092

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 11:13 PM

How to reset your password in Ubuntu

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/resetpassword

 

There are many reasons you might want to reset a password:

  • Someone gave you a computer with Ubuntu installed on it but not the password for the user account.
  • You just installed Ubuntu and forgot what password you selected during the installation process.
  • You have too many passwords in your life and can't keep track of them all.

That tutorial may as well have stated a 4th option, chances are it will be used more than the above three.

 

"To crash into anyone's PC as needed"

 

It concerns me that there are way too many tutorials on how to get into locked computers openly posted on the Internet. The user or administrator who setup the install should record any passwords when created & if that person cannot get back into it, then tough luck. Reinstall & start over, keeping up with simple things such as important passwords. Chances are, that same person would have no trouble remembering the unlock code on their smartphone or Twitter/Facebook apps.

 

All the more reason to deploy TrueCrypt, as well as set supervisor & user passwords in the BIOS & placing a good padlock on the computer to prevent resetting. This prevents the computer from booting, even from a CD or Flash device. It is also a good idea to replace any removeable screws on the case with those that has a nut on the inside (2 nuts on each screw are best) to further prevent internal access. Along with a padlock, the potential thief in essence would have to risk destroying the computer's sensitive components to open it, making TrueCrypt the final line of protection. If hard drives & SSD's are encrypted, all of a thief's efforts to get into the computer ends in futility.

 

The thing is, it's not as though this costs a lot of upfront cash. The padlock being the most expensive item & a container of nuts & bolts of varying sizes are cheap. TrueCrypt is free & easy to use.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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