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Installing Windows 8.1 Pro, what's the problem?


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#1 TempleCat

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 07:12 PM

I have an Acer Aspire V5 which came loaded with Windows 8, later updated to 8.1.  I use the computer not only for surfing, but also for taking classes online for paralegal.  My classes sometimes have downloads they say are necessary or helpful, and it has caused some issues in general, like certain things not working properly if at all.  With only four weeks left til the semester is completed, the desire is there for a clean wipe and installing an 8.1 Pro (so I can practice my office work during the summer). 

 

now the question-  on all the ads for 8.1 Pro I have seen, it says it can only be installed on computers that came with Windows 7 Why does it matter?

 

I want my own disc, in case I need it in the future.  Sure I can download it, but it seems every time I download from the net I have problems.



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#2 cat1092

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 12:35 AM

Did you create your recovery media set when the computer was new? This usually requires 3 to 5 DVD's, many now allows to do this task with a 16GB Flash drive. Or do you still have a system image from that time? If so, you can revert.

 

That way, you can reinstall the OS to out of the box condition. Some computers takes the 8.1 upgrade well & others don't. This can be OEM specific (lack of driver support), or the underlying file sysyem on Windows 8 wasn't in top shape to begin with. If the Windows 8 install itself is buggy, chances are, 8.1 will be worse, as the outcome depends on the foundation.

 

 

now the question-  on all the ads for 8.1 Pro I have seen, it says it can only be installed on computers that came with Windows 7 Why does it matter?

8.1 Pro can be installed on any hardware that will run it, provided you have the right license key. I have it on 2 notebooks, 8 Pro was clean installed to where the Release Preview was installed, which was a legit option at the time. I later upgraded to 8.1 Pro, but on one notebook, it took 2 attempts to get it right.

 

However many who has downloaded the 8.1 media has had issues with clean install & activation. I have the media myself, for repair, should it be necessary, but haven't attempted to do a refresh/reset nor a clean install, which is what a Reset in essence is. The most reported issue that I've seen, is that Windows 8.1 Pro won't activate with an 8 Pro key.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 dc3

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 12:58 PM

Let me see if I've got this straight.

 

You originally had Windows 7 installed on this computer originally.  Then you updated to Windows 8, then up to 8.1?

 

If this is the case, you will need to go back to Windows 7.  You should be able to do this with the recovery partition.

 

You will need the upgrade product key to reinstall the upgrade, since you have done this before you should be aware of what all is entailed.


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#4 cat1092

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 01:37 PM

The OP stated that the computer came loaded with Windows 8 & evidently upgraded to 8.1.

 

This is where backups really comes in handy. Also I've read that the upgrade can damage the original recovery partition, on a MS site, that makes having reinstall media a must.

 

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows8_1-windows_install/recovery-partition-damaged/705eebfe-8d80-45fe-a3af-3e7cb7f120c8

 

If the computer owner doesn't create recovery media when new, some OEM's will supply it when in warranty (Dell does, in one business day upon request), others may or may do so for a fee only.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 saluqi

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 10:27 PM

A couple of comments on other people's comments - I've lost contact with the original posts so this is more or less a shot in the dark ...

 

I agree completely! Of course, you are speaking rationally with the end line user in mind. M$ could care less about him/her. (By the way thank you for the M$ acronym, I will use it from now on). And neither do these other Big Brother computer entities. I've ranted here about HP putting a chip on their ink tanks to stop people from refilling them ( I found 2 workarounds--one is a company that sells refillable ink tanks and 2) never to buy another HP product again.

 

 

 

As noted elsewhere, COSTCO refills HP cartridges at a fraction of the cost of a new one.   So far that has worked for me.

 

 

 

All this comes with the territory. As Davnel says, programmers are "concerned about impressing each other with how clever they are" with little or no concern for the endline user.

 

I earned my living as a programmer for about a decade - writing mostly database applications for municipal uses like senior daycare centers, paratransit systems etc., and for truck-weighing-related things like asphalt wholesaling, road building and so on.  My guiding principle in writing "better mousetraps" (and I did produce a few of those, on which my former employers are getting millions in royalties) was that no matter what the code looks like, if the resulting application does not make the user's life easier, it is no damn good.  Software is a tool, and the goal of any software writer should be to make the tool as capable and useful as humanly possible.  That way you can go home and sleep at night.  Actually, since those were usually database systems of some sort, I often sat up at night fixing data input errors while nobody was logged on <G>.  That teaches you "validate, validate, validate" on the input side.  Say you are working on a senior-care system one of whose data fields is the customer's physician of record - for a large-ish city of mostly Italian-origin people with long easily confused names.  The data-entry clerks have no way of knowing whether a physician's name, given them by an elderly client with perhaps some degree of mental confusion, is correct or not.  If that name is not found in the physicians' register, however, a red window pops up, offering a menu of similar names which are in the register.  A lot of extra work, of course (those ancillary databases have to be maintained) but absolutely necessary.

 

I have to say I have been using Windows 8 for a couple of months now and so far I am quite comfortable with it.  It took me maybe 10 minutes to figure out that you work from the desktop, not from the Metro screen.  Pin the programs you frequently use to the taskbar (or better, to a quick launch bar you can create) so they are available at a single click.  Don't use "apps" from the Windows store, use real programs.  In the meantime I have also added the Classic Shell but in fact I don't need to use that very often.  Use Chrome or Firefox rather than MSIE.  None of that is earthshaking or even composure-disturbing.  Yes XP was wonderful but it's past time to move on.



#6 cat1092

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 11:58 PM

 

Yes XP was wonderful but it's past time to move on.

How did XP get into this thread? I've reread the first three posts, including the OP & see no reference to XP.

 

Are you responding to another thread?

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 czarboom

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 03:33 AM

now the question-  on all the ads for 8.1 Pro I have seen, it says it can only be installed on computers that came with Windows 7 Why does it matter?

 

I want my own disc, in case I need it in the future.  Sure I can download it, but it seems every time I download from the net I have problems.

That is for the upgrade people.  You have Windows 8 installed by OEM then your good to go.  Before you do a clean reinstall did you try a system restore or system recovery.  There are 4 options in Windows 8.  Here is some info on what they do and how to use them.  Click here.

 

Good luck


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#8 dc3

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 11:02 AM

In Windows 8 the product key is embedded in the BIOS/UEFI.  This means that a fresh installation from a installation disc is not possible until a means of retrieving the  product key is developed.  At this point the best you could do would be to use the Recovery Partition to return the operating system to the state it came out of the box.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#9 saluqi

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 12:26 PM

Cat1092 wrote:

 

How did XP get into this thread? I've reread the first three posts, including the OP & see no reference to XP.

 

Are you responding to another thread?

 

I don't know how my reply got here.  I was responding to a couple of comments in the general tenor of how terrible that XP is now obsolete.  I probably posted inadvertently to the wrong thread.  Sorry for the confusion!



#10 cat1092

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 12:05 AM

Cat1092 wrote:

 

How did XP get into this thread? I've reread the first three posts, including the OP & see no reference to XP.

 

Are you responding to another thread?

 

I don't know how my reply got here.  I was responding to a couple of comments in the general tenor of how terrible that XP is now obsolete.  I probably posted inadvertently to the wrong thread.  Sorry for the confusion!

No problem, we're all human & as such, aren't perfect. I'm sure that at sometime or the other, I've done the same.

 

No harm done.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 cat1092

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 12:17 AM

In Windows 8 the product key is embedded in the BIOS/UEFI.  This means that a fresh installation from a installation disc is not possible until a means of retrieving the  product key is developed.  At this point the best you could do would be to use the Recovery Partition to return the operating system to the state it came out of the box.

One can run RWEverything & fish out the key in the UEFI BIOS chip. I tried it myself, just to see if it would work. This key is different from that shown on Speccy or Belarc Advisor.

 

http://www.nextofwindows.com/how-to-retrieve-windows-8-oem-product-key-from-bios/?ModPagespeed=noscript

 

Though I initially found this on the My Digital Life forums. I don't feel it's appropiate to link the thread to that forum here, but just Google search "how to find Windows 8 key with RWPortable" w/out the quotes, it's the 3rd or 4th link down, with highly detailed instructions. It's not illegal to use whatever tool needed to get your product key.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 czarboom

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 01:05 AM

In Windows 8 the product key is embedded in the BIOS/UEFI.  This means that a fresh installation from a installation disc is not possible until a means of retrieving the  product key is developed.  At this point the best you could do would be to use the Recovery Partition to return the operating system to the state it came out of the box.

I remember that now, old man worked at Dell forever and he told me that.  They had or have a way to un do it, but I do not remember what he said.  Ill ask next time I see him.  Just a thought what about grabbing the product key for Windows 8 then flashing the BIOS?   Don't know if that would do it, just throwing out ideas.

 

Also, DC3 you have me a little help awhile back with some BSOD issues, less than equal too type.  In any case it was the Intel RST version and the Nvidia graphics duel card.  Got it thought wanted to thank you for the help got me down the right path.


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"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#13 dc3

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 10:00 AM

 

In Windows 8 the product key is embedded in the BIOS/UEFI.  This means that a fresh installation from a installation disc is not possible until a means of retrieving the  product key is developed.  At this point the best you could do would be to use the Recovery Partition to return the operating system to the state it came out of the box.

One can run Everything & fish out the key in the UEFI BIOS chip. I tried it myself, just to see if it would work. This key is different from that shown on Speccy or Belarc Advisor.

 

Nice find.  I had spent the better part of an afternoon looking for a means of getting the product key.  Microsoft has a command which can produce the last four characters, but that isn't much help.

 

After reading about Microsoft's attempt to preempt pirating of their product key by embedding it in the BIOS/UEFI my first thought was what do you do if your hdd fails.

 

Edit:  There is a tutorial for RWEverything


Edited by dc3, 28 April 2014 - 10:13 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#14 dc3

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 10:02 AM

@czarboom,  I appreciate the thought.  I'm always glad to be able to help others. :thumbup2:


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#15 czarboom

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 02:20 AM

seems we keep going after the same posts.... its cool though cause I keep learning new stuff in your replys. 


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?




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