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What Is Modem Compression?


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#1 TMacK

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 10:39 AM

Not sure if this is the correct forum or not ,so I'll try...
I have no other choice but to use dial up here in the country. Read somewhere that unchecking the enable modem compression option can speed up my kbps.,but don't want to fiddle around with this kind of thing until I got an opinion from BC! As you can guess I am desperate for any kind of speed enhancing tool!
Instructions were-control panel/double click network and internet connections/net work connections/right click your connection/select properties/under the general tab,click configure/uncheck enable modem compression/okay.
I do the routine performance & maintenance stuff,and today am running at 53kbps.
Has anyone tried this?
Thanx!
TMacK
Chaos reigns within.
Reflect, repent, and reboot.
Order shall return.

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#2 Albert Frankenstein

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 10:50 AM

I have no other choice but to use dial up here in the country.


Assuming your are in the USA you do have the option of getting a satelite internet connection. It is kind of pricey, though. More info can be found HERE.

Sorry, I do not know much about modem compression, so now I will return you to your regularly scheduled question....
ALBERT FRANKENSTEIN
I'M SO SMART IT'S SCARY!


Currently home chillin' with the fam and my two dogs!


#3 ThorXP

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 12:05 PM

Here is a site on modem compression, it is a little bit difficult to explain but this does it rather well.

http://www.digit-life.com/articles/compressv44vsv42bis/

There are lots of articles you can read just Google = Modem compression and away you go just click and read.

#4 ddeerrff

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 02:06 PM

53.3K is your initial link rate - about the best you can expect. But it is the link rate, and only is an indication of what you might get for throughput.

Link rate may vary during the connect - it may go up or down depending on line conditions at the moment. Throughput is determined by link rate, error rate, compressability, protocol overhead, and a other things that you don't have a lot of control over.

Modem compression works similar to other compression methods, such as .zip, but does so in real time. Leaving it enabled will speed download of compressable material such as web pages and text files. It will not make any difference in downloading already compressed files sch as zip and MP3s.

Unchecking the compression would have the possibility of speeding up the initial link rate only if the link was being confused by the modems attempt to handshake. Historically, there have been some incompatabilities between the way a particular modem interprets the specs and the way the host interprets them - this has pretty much been overcome.

Bottom line - leave the compression enabled and be happy with your connect rate.
Derfram
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#5 TMacK

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 02:30 PM

Thanx for all the Great info you three!
I did do a Google search but didn't really come to any solid conclusion...and was beginning to wonder however,like you said ddeerff ,if it ain't broke,don't fix it,any just be happy with my rate as it is! The link provided by ThorXP explained it pretty well tho.
BTW Albert Frankenstein,we have been working on getting wireless service out here and expect it will happen by summers end :thumbsup:. Did consider at one time about going into satellite internet service,as we can get it up here in Canada also.
BC to the rescue again...Thanx so much!
Happy & safe computing to you all! :flowers:
TMacK
Chaos reigns within.
Reflect, repent, and reboot.
Order shall return.

aaaaaaaa a~Suzie Wagner

#6 Herk

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 09:32 PM

From my ancient memories, modem compression actually shortens the amount of data that needs to be sent. I don't see where it would speed anything up to turn it off - even if you get faster speed, you have to send more data.

Another modem problem is relying on Windows and hardware resources (like memory) which may be low - in the old days, I always opted for the more expensive Standard Modem rather than a Winmodem because it had everything necessary to do the work of a modem without relying on Windows programs or system memory to function. (And Linux wouldn't run a Winmodem!)

The sad truth about dialup is that your actual speed is pathetic. 56k isn't. More commonly, the actual throughput is more like between 2k and 7k. One of the tricks to speed up downloads was to use multiple data streams, which would allow the same speed but several instances downloading at once.

A fine little program that I used to use to measure what was actually happening was Netstat Live! by Analog X. You can put it on one side of your screen and monitor the speed of your up and down-loads. I have a reasonably good connection here, but I've been at homes that have as little as 1k per second.

#7 ddeerrff

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 11:57 PM

Used to be 'full hardware' modems, 'controllerless modems' such as the WinModem (tm- usrobotics/3com) and 'Soft modems' where virtually everything but the DAA is implemented in software.

Just about everything now are 'Soft modems' - certainly anything that is OEM installed in a windows computer. A softmodem is about $3.00 worth of parts.
Derfram
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#8 TMacK

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Posted 19 May 2006 - 09:37 AM

From my ancient memories, modem compression actually shortens the amount of data that needs to be sent. I don't see where it would speed anything up to turn it off - even if you get faster speed, you have to send more data


Ya,this is what what sounding contradictory to me Herk.
I have a little 'Fast dial" program that is suppose to speed up things by up to 5X...and it shows the rates.By the sounds of things I should be darned satisfied with my speed! So won't even ask about multiple data streams.
Cheers!
TMacK
Chaos reigns within.
Reflect, repent, and reboot.
Order shall return.

aaaaaaaa a~Suzie Wagner




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