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Microsoft Double Speak


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#1 Stolen

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 11:50 PM

The Double Speak of Microsoft
How ISPs Are Getting Away With Invading Your Communications

Written By

Stolen

March 29, 2014 // 11:12 PM CDT

Outlook.png
MS Outlook Ad

What Microsoft Says

Microsoft Corporation once advertised, "We don't go through your email to sell ads." What Microsoft does instead is go through your email for everything else.

Microsoft is establishing a way for major Internet Service Providers to get away with accessing and using actual communications of customers while couching everything under "protection." The violation goes way beyond the collection and storage of data while not even violating Microsoft's own Privacy Policy or Terms of Service.

Since Microsoft and all the other big ISPs are now allowed by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act to read and disclose its customers communications (email, blogs, texts, chat), the law itself protects Microsoft and all ISPs and gives them a way out since they stand on the premise that the data belongs to them, so there is no expectation of privacy. Where does that leave you, the consumer, and what does it mean for journalists?

Recently Microsoft, without a court order, accessed the private emails and chat communications between one of its customers who was blogging with an ex MS employee. The employee did break the law,but Microsoft sidestepped legal process to gather the evidence on its own and then turn it over to authorities who proceeded to arrest the individual.

The current Administration has repeatedly assured us that the ISPs are innocently collecting and simply storing data in the name of national security' in order to keep us all safe from terrorism. Not true since there is a little backdoor which allows Microsoft (because it can) to go in and search and read and use details of communications of its customers. In this case, Microsoft did just that by accessing the Hotmail account (which is now Outlook and owned by MS) of a customer because they wanted to use the information they found to go after an ex-employee.

It appears that ISPs get to invade customer communications because it is in THEIR best interest since the ECPA law was recently interpreted and changed to allow ISPs to get away with whatever they want to. What happened to due process? It is apparent that the bottom line is all that matters for the ISP.

In this particular case, Microsoft did not go to a judge or get a court order; and despite the public being assured that ISPs will not misuse the data they are 'collecting and storing', remember, they dont have to any more. Microsoft considers this information to belong to them in the first place.

After Microsoft came under fire for the incident, John Frank, Microsoft General Counsel, issued a statement that included magnificent double speak to convince us all that MS is only protecting their customers and justifying the action by saying his company "took extraordinary actions based on the specific circumstances" to "protect our customers and the security and integrity of our products."

Oh yes, the action Microsoft took was indeed extraordinary.

Frank went on to justify the legal reasoning guiding Microsoft's actions and explained how Microsoft adhered to its own terms of service as it was determined by its own investigation. Frank said that courts do not "issue orders authorizing someone to search themselves, since obviously no such order is needed," basing his argument on Microsoft owns the data so they just don't need a court order to go get whatever they want or target whomever they choose.

Frank added that Microsoft will not search customer email (and other communications) unless it would justify a court order if one were available. The fact is that if Microsoft does not follow legal procedures in the first place or attempt to get a court order, then of course there wont be one 'available' so he establishes the way out of following any due process.

Frank also made sure to tell us how Microsoft has had our backs and even has their very own internal process set up that is designed to protect customers from Microsoft deciding to grab emails and using the specific information. Part of the plan apparently involves an internal legal staff that operates independently from another internal department to jointly determine if a court order would otherwise be issued by a judge before they can go in (internally) and grab all your actual communications. Lots of 'internal' machinations go into the very internal determination. They even announced they will now follow extra steps and submit their evidence (noteevidence they already have collected) to an outside attorney to review.

One can safely assume Microsoft is paying this outside attorney as a consultant with a CDA in place, so of course this outside attorney is really an inside attorney on the side of MS, and this statement is simply double speak to make Microsoft look good. "Oh, we are hiring an outside attorney who used to be a former judge even! And he will help us determine if it's okay for us to use emails and chat conversations of our customers before we decide to go use it."

With the loss of Net Neutrality and the recent changes in the law that favor their bottom line, the ISPs like Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, can pretty much do what they want now and charge what they want. This is only the beginning of the double speak but there are still people who can see through. And, it's not half way in and half way out, its never halfway when only the consumer is losing.

The incident should raise major red flags among bloggers and journalists who use Microsoft and other ISP services to communicate and do research, particularly when it comes to protection of sources.


Further Reading
Boing Boing / NY Times / ZD Net


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#2 czarboom

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 02:47 AM

Not surprised, is that a bad thing.  Seems Microsoft is dead set on doing to the internet and software what they did you hardware in the 90s.


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#3 Winterland

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 07:41 AM

I'll be sleeping a lot better tonight knowing that Frank and his team have "got my back".  :lol:

 

As always Stolen, thank you for the link and the info.

 

It's been disheartening the way things have been going lately on the Electronic Front, but if we keep our sense of History about us and remind ourselves that these types of posts and the linked articles is the first (very good) step in keeping our selves informed and, by extension, armed.

 

onward,

 

Winterland

 

 


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#4 cat1092

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 11:44 PM

Not surprised, is that a bad thing.  Seems Microsoft is dead set on doing to the internet and software what they did you hardware in the 90s.

Yes & it seems to be working well. The Windows 8 project will go down in the books as a flop, but the next version, from a historical perspective, will be a hit, otherwise MS will go down. However, the live login type of OS won't go away, and more of our privacy (what little we have) will.

 

There is a glittering hope on the horizon & there's been recent growth, with Linux based OS's. We have a choice, at least for home use. If the cold, hard truth was known, only 5% of the Windows userbase really "needs" the brand. I know that there are some that does, but the large majority of computer users browses the Web, send & receive emails, make transactions (shopping, banking & paying bills), Facebook participation, all which can be done on many Linux OS's such as Linux Mint or Ubuntu, among others. There is VLC for a media player, as it is in Windows, there is Skype.

 

As far as the ISP's goes, there's little we can do about that, they know where we go, what we do on the Web. I do understand that in part this has to do with piracy, but also in a larger part to the government. That will likely get worse before it gets better, but I always sign petitions that favors us in these areas. Don't know how much good it does, however silence equals acceptance. I'd rather speak up & get shot down, than to be shot down w/out a stand.

 

I don't trust anyone at Microsoft "covering my back". If they're "protecting me", I'd not want to know what they'd do if they were after me. They made out as though we were being done a favor when we were purchasing licenses for Windows 8 for $40 at the launch, but I believe they got more for the money than we did. Which is why, other than updating, I seldom use the OS. And yes, I know in all of that fine print that's referred to as the EULA, I handed over a lot more than $40 & my digital signature, twice. But it was months afterwards did I realize the impact & likely still don't realize the full effect.

 

Of course, this isn't just a Windows 8 issue, it's just that being logged into MS's servers compounds things heavily.

 

While we can't control the actions of ISP's. we can control what OS we run. Since 2009, I've been using Linux Mint, and in the last year, have used it more than in the previous four combined. There was the day, in the early mid 80's, when Bill Gates would have coveted the seemingly small slice of the computing pie that Linux now has, which has climbed a lot in the last year. He was fighting to just stay afloat in those years.

 

One of the things about MS that I can't & won't understand, is why they're shoving all of this unwanted new crap down our throats, which has only been accepted by less than 12% of it's userbase. And at the same time, won't even offer SP2 for it's still today largest usershare & still money maker today, Windows 7. No corporation can survive & ignore it bread & butter customers forever. And they cannot continue to release unwanted products until 2020, the year of Windows 7 fall, which will likely be extended.

 

The fact is & remains, Windows 8 wasn't even needed for notebook & PC use. It could & should have been a tablet release only. Windows 7 & Office 2010 was MS's cash cow, all they had to do was let the milk flow. Instead, they disrupted the entire computing market,

 

My final words & I'm outta here. We do have a choice of OS to run & have the power to make a difference. We don't have to accept their EULA's. We can image the drive (or just replace it) & install the OS of our choosing on new computers. A couple of BIOS changes & our freedom is back. And the sweet thing is, the OS's complete with a Full Office suite, are 100% Free. For professionals, there's a few subscription editions of Linux.

 

We can make a difference. However, it has to be with actions combined with words, not words only. No matter the cause, we have to make a stand for what we believe in. It really works.

 

All the Best,

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 31 March 2014 - 11:44 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 NickAu

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 11:52 PM

 

There is a glittering hope on the horizon & there's been recent growth, with Linux based OS's

Our numbers are growing. Thats how many millions of dollars Microsoft didnt get?

 

China Downloaded More Than 1.5 Million Copies of Ubuntu in 2013

http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/02/number-of-ubuntu-downloads-in-china


Edited by NickAu1, 31 March 2014 - 11:54 PM.


#6 cat1092

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 12:53 AM

 

Our numbers are growing. Thats how many millions of dollars Microsoft didnt get?

And there goes some of XP's numbers also, the Chinese is a huge market for the aging OS. Still, many of those are on new computers, as I had been reading articles pertaining to Dell distributing Ubuntu computers there.

 

Also, Dell struck the US market again, more seriously this time, with some decent offerings,

 

http://www.itworld.com/hardware/383028/dells-sputnik-3-touchscreen-laptop-has-ubuntu-linux-intels-haswell

 

And keep in mind that anyone who buys a Chromebook is supporting Linux. Our numbers are continuing to grow & if the current trend continues, MS will be forced to backtrack into giving it's customers the simple things they wanted all along, a Start Menu that has withstood the test of time & scrap all of this UEFI/Secure Boot crap that has piled confusion on top of confusion. Reasonable people don't mind gradual, small increments of change so bad, but 15 years worth in one release? And locking customers out of the hardware we pay for?

 

It would be great to see a class action suit slapped on MS over these things, the invasion of privacy, distributing software w/out readying the people for it & locking users out of their own hardware. Of course, there's going to say the OEM's did it, but the fact is, MS mandated the OEM's do it.

 

Hopefully Linux usage will double in the next year.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 czarboom

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 02:05 AM

Microsoft, like everyone outside of Open Source, only does things that profit them.  MS, through bad leadership, turned away from software, and apps.  This allowed Google and others to jump on it.  But, overall, I love how Microsoft using the base of Unix created their product, then turned around and tried to destroy Open Source over and over again... funny... not really.

 

MS wants everyone to be on Windows 8.1, Why? their bottom line.  Microsoft got left behind when they didn’t realize that the hardware game was over, and they won.  Now it’s the software game, and it took them soooo long and CEO Steve B. who helped lead the company into a year after year loss of market share and profit. 

 

This lead to MS stating last year, that they want to be in the same game as Apple is, "pushing firmware and software out every 9 months".  Two reasons, 1. More money.  2. Forcing you to use the product like they want you to, not how you want to. 

 

Funny, how Windows 8 and 8.1 look a lot like cell phone OS's... weird huh.  Even better, the removal of the start button.... and when we all complained they.... put a item in place that does what the right click mouse button on Windows 7 does.  Why, easy.... the less access the user has to the system the more Windows can make you only use their products, and services.

 

MS right now is transitioning to a software company, and they want to do to Windows what AT&T, Verizon etc. have done to the cell phone market.  Use you device that you own, only how we want you too.  Again money.

 

Case in point is Dell.  They have a little driver that you might have on your laptop called ST Microelectronics Accelerometer, v.1.0.0.15, A00

Driver info click here.

 

If you have a unknown device driver in the other list in device manger then its usually that.  Dell claims it’s to "start shutdown process to protect components when your device is dropped, allowing the device to protect itself."  If fact they convince Businesses to add this feature to their laptops for 15$ a pop to help protect the device long term.

This is almost totally FALSE.

What it really does is work like the white sticker in your cell phone.  Meaning if you drop your laptop and it breaks, that is NOT covered by Dells warranty.  The Accelerometer records if the device is dropped and when tech support logs into your laptop it tells them that.     Funny... I’m not surprised.

 

Remember, NO computer company right now installs, or adds a feature to your computers that does not benefit them somehow. 

 

Linux is making a comeback, but not in the way we all hoped.  Just like cars most users of computers want simple and those of us who are advanced/super users, want the opposite of that.  We want tools, and scripts, bashes, and sniffers....

That is why right now my favorite Linux build is Kali.  It’s a great OS that is the new Backtrack.  Not only is it open source and free, but it comes with 60+ penetration and security tools, that allow everything from sniffing, packet tracing and spoofing to air cracks etc.  To learn how to use those takes forever but try it out.  Download the .iso and run it from windows through a VM like VMware Player or VB.  It’s a great build.

 

I too agree that supporting the network neutrality agreement, and keeping the internet open, is the KEY thing to it continuing to improve.  Korea has a universal free Gigabyte internet, and a booming tech and gaming industry because of it.  We still pay through our teeth in America for 10mb speeds.... why?   The ISPs don’t want to spend the money on upgrading the current Backbone and structure to meet that goal, instead they want the laws changed to allow them to deny traffic so they can continue to charger 100$ a month of subpar internet. 

 

I’m lust glad I’m not the only one who sees this... heck I got better speeds when I was in the Army then I do in the civilian world. 


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#8 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 12:51 PM

Microsoft is not that bad when compared to Apple who sells not only proprietary software but proprietary hardware too at huge prices. I doubt how large will be today's PC market without Microsoft and their Windows operating systems. If there was no Microsoft  at early 80s, entire PC market will be in the hands of evil Apple and we will be forced to use completely locked down hardware. Whether you like or dislike - the fact is Linux owes Windows for giving it a chance to born and grow. Even today, nothing prevent you from turning off "SecureBoot" , wiping the hard drive and installing a Linux distro.



#9 cat1092

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 11:25 PM

 

Even today, nothing prevent you from turning off "SecureBoot" , wiping the hard drive and installing a Linux distro.

That's a great thing to do. Even better, image the drive & not accept MS's EULA prior to wiping. Or replace it with a SSD, setup properly, Linux runs as well on these as Windows.

 

Unfortunately, there some devices (I believe the ARM based "RT" tablets) that's locked down. Which leads me to wonder, were customers warned in advance or at the point of sale that they'd be locked into RT for the lifetime of the devices? Sure there were tech articles, but only a fraction of computer owners reads these or is a tech forum member.

 

 

If there was no Microsoft  at early 80s, entire PC market will be in the hands of evil Apple and we will be forced to use completely locked down hardware.

That is true. However, when MS & Co. had the chance to kick Apple when they were down in the later 90's & force them into a distant memory today, instead Bill Gates loaned Steve Jobs $150,000,000 at terms that didn't benefit MS at all. Sure there were lawsutits dropped, but the thing was, Apple had no time for litigation. The corporation was within weeks (or days) of bankruptcy. Yes, post mortem Apple may have won something, but those awards would have been dispersed to their creditiors. Plus with no money, where would Apple's defense team's funding come from?

 

Without that loan, there would be no iPod, iPad, iPhone, iTunes or iAnything. MS would have hired many of their unemployed developers & created similar projects.

 

Hell, even Apple's own fans were booing Jobs during the Apple announcement.

 

http://www.wired.com/2009/08/dayintech_0806/

 

I recall this because it was being discussed frequently in the offce where I worked, due to Apple Computer's financially difficulities, the company turned to Windows for their IT needs. It was a planned event, that was executed seamlessly. Employees were trained on the new computers (the majority handheld computers) 3 days before the transision.

 

In recent years, Bill & Melissa Gates has been very generous to society, but that deal in 1997 was a shot in the foot. I'd be willing to bet that Steve Ballmer was licking his chops at the sight of the falling competition & was likely irate at learning of Gates decision. And over the years, especially recent ones, knows that deal played some part in his fate.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 02 April 2014 - 09:35 AM

 

 

Unfortunately, there some devices (I believe the ARM based "RT" tablets) that's locked down. Which leads me to wonder, were customers warned in advance or at the point of sale that they'd be locked into RT for the lifetime of the devices? Sure there were tech articles, but only a fraction of computer owners reads these or is a tech forum member.

 

Agree to that. With the evolution of powerful ARM processors, smart phones and Tablets are already started to replace laptops and Desktops. After a couple of years, PC will be only used for applications which requires raw computing power such as CAD works, Engineering etc. A powerful smartphone will be enough for a home user for his computing needs. Sony and Samsung - two major laptop manufacturers - already stopped PC production. 

 

IT market is changing and Microsoft well understood that so they started to focus on mobile computing devices. They just don't care about Desktop users anymore as there is no future in there. With locked RT devices, Microsoft may be trying to mimic Apple. We should really started to worry about the fate of open source software as it is illegal to unlock smart phones at least in some countries. 


Edited by Anshad Edavana, 02 April 2014 - 09:42 AM.


#11 cat1092

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 02:16 AM

 

They just don't care about Desktop users anymore as there is no future in there

That's what MS is banking on anyway.

 

I've been reading for years that the PC is dying, is dead, but in many homes where there one or more portable devices & even more so in business/corporate enviornments, there's one or more PC's or server that stores files (movies, music & backups) & keeps everything in sync.

 

These days, PC's includes notebooks, which have more powerful CPU/GPU's for gaming & number crunching. The largest computing market, as well as the largest segment of the population, the "boomer" generation, is starting to get older & cannot see all of those ultra small devices. I have personally used one tablet in my lifetime & was glad for my no-line bifocals, as 7' screens are way too small for comfortable use. Many of which feels that a phone & computer isn't an AIO type of device.

 

Tower PC's have taken the largest hit in sales, however that means one thing to those who will stick to them, as I have. Lower pricing & more power than ever, consuming less electricity at the same time. There will also always be an enthusisast market, those who builds their own PC's for daily use or gaming. Corporations such as NVIDIA hanging tough with $700-$1000 GPU's that's moving is further proof that the gaming market is good. In fact, there has been a recent increase in GPU pricing at most levels. However other components, such as SSD's, has took steep plunges as of late. True RAM type SSD's (not Flash based) are on the horizon, but too expensive for the average consumer. These, would take many, many years to wear out & at the same time be faster than ever, as DDR4 RAM is around the corner too.

 

Don't take me wrong, I realize that there is a huge mobile market, not only smartphones & tablets, but other handheld computing devices for certain type of jobs, such as sales/invetory management. Smartphones has the advantage of being connected to theiur carrier or using wi-fi hotspots, some now with WPA-PSK2 protection, that doesn't count towards data usage. Pricing is also lowering, due to competition. Which is good for the consumer, as Apple had priced too many potential customers out of the market. And in the next year, Google is expected to make a bold entry, placing more pressure on Apple than ever to lower pricing.

 

http://techcrunch.com/2014/02/27/googles-project-ara-50-modular-smartphone-could-change-the-way-we-buy-phones-starting-next-year/

 

Google is the one corporation that has the potential to bring Apple back to it's knees again, what new innovative product has Apple released since Steve Jobs passing? Nothing, just adding eye candy to older lines. In the meantime, Google is showing innovation from several fronts, including wi-fi & landline Internet/TV combos, with plans on expansion to new areas.

 

There is also another PC market growing, that of a small box not much larger than some cable modems. Some are being used as media centers, a market which is still in demand. Not all are powered by Windows, there are some though, as well as Linux boxes & Apple is rumored to release a new one soon. Some of which has as much as 8GB RAM, SSD, HDMI, USB3 & running Intel Haswell CPU's, though there are lower cost options & the DIY Raspeberry kits. These are making gains. Upper mid-level performance in a small package. That's a trend we'll have to keep a watch on.

 

One segment of the ultra portables, the netbook, has faded, Some are still bundled into 2 year data contracts, but demand is at all time lows in favor of tablets & smartphones.

 

There's a lot of portable devices on the market, but can MS seize the market? With all of the competition, some up & coming, it's going to be a long, uphill battle. MS ate a 900 million loss of the 1st round of the Surface tablet line. That is one of MS's weaknesses, they jump on the bandwagon way too late. Has had the opportunity since introducing XP tablets, long ago & is playing catchup from way behind.

 

That is good news for everyone. How long can MS retain it's 90+% market share?

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 czarboom

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 12:02 AM

Microsoft is not that bad when compared to Apple who sells not only proprietary software but proprietary hardware too at huge prices. I doubt how large will be today's PC market without Microsoft and their Windows operating systems. If there was no Microsoft  at early 80s, entire PC market will be in the hands of evil Apple and we will be forced to use completely locked down hardware. Whether you like or dislike - the fact is Linux owes Windows for giving it a chance to born and grow. Even today, nothing prevent you from turning off "SecureBoot" , wiping the hard drive and installing a Linux distro.

I can agree a little, but in the 80's and 90's Apple was the complete oppisite of what it was today.  Steve Jobs was a huge open source defender (until this company was taken away from him).  He was one of the few that tried in vain to challenge Microsofts Hardware grab of the 90's. 

Later, when he got back Apple that is when you saw a Steve and a Apple that wanted your money, and wanted you to do only what they wanted you to do with it.  Which was a real blow considering Steve Jobs and Waz were so critical in defending Open Source to start with.

Even in 1996 Steves return to Apple he dumped the current OS and copied BDS NEXTstep as what became Cocoa.  so its super sad that Apple its self fought so hard aganist HTC and open use of their products.


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#13 cat1092

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 01:13 AM

One good thing, compared to the 90's, there's more competition than ever, so I don't believe we'll have to be concerned with MS totally controlling the market. Google's entry in the market ensured that & they are here to stay. Unlike MS under Steve Ballmer, introducing a new technology & dumping it months later, Google will stick with a plan & push forward & continue to execute new ideas in new markets.

 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-10/google-chromebook-under-300-defies-pc-market-with-growth.html

 

Apple won't try to compete at these prices, which will decrease their market share in years to come & eat into MS's also, both of which is good for all consumers. Plus expand the Linux community as well.

 

Notice Google's slice of notebook sales between the years of 2012 & 2013, a staggering 47x fold in sales. Plus Chromebooks, as of 12/26/2013, had 21% market share.

 

http://www.dailytech.com/Chromebooks+Capture+21+Percent+of+2013+US+Notebook+Sales/article33985.htm

 

And Android battles it out with Apple in the smartphone market, which it's beginning to win. Apple's hanging close, but unless that substancially lower prices, will in the end lose out. In this economy, $600+ smartphones are not the hottest seller it once was. Neither do they have Steve Jobs to convince it's users that they "need" the newer ones.

 

http://www.androidheadlines.com/2014/04/us-smartphone-marketshare-numbers-february-dominated-android.html

 

I just don't see MS holding onto that 90+% market share much longer, according to the numbers. It is the continual distribution of Windows 7 & Office 2010 that has the corporation at that level. Once MS falls below 90% marketshare, they'll never reach that height again.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 czarboom

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 12:50 AM

One good thing, compared to the 90's, there's more competition than ever, so I don't believe we'll have to be concerned with MS totally controlling the market. Google's entry in the market ensured that & they are here to stay. Unlike MS under Steve Ballmer, introducing a new technology & dumping it months later, Google will stick with a plan & push forward & continue to execute new ideas in new markets.

 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-10/google-chromebook-under-300-defies-pc-market-with-growth.html

 

Apple won't try to compete at these prices, which will decrease their market share in years to come & eat into MS's also, both of which is good for all consumers. Plus expand the Linux community as well.

 

Notice Google's slice of notebook sales between the years of 2012 & 2013, a staggering 47x fold in sales. Plus Chromebooks, as of 12/26/2013, had 21% market share.

 

http://www.dailytech.com/Chromebooks+Capture+21+Percent+of+2013+US+Notebook+Sales/article33985.htm

 

And Android battles it out with Apple in the smartphone market, which it's beginning to win. Apple's hanging close, but unless that substancially lower prices, will in the end lose out. In this economy, $600+ smartphones are not the hottest seller it once was. Neither do they have Steve Jobs to convince it's users that they "need" the newer ones.

 

http://www.androidheadlines.com/2014/04/us-smartphone-marketshare-numbers-february-dominated-android.html

 

I just don't see MS holding onto that 90+% market share much longer, according to the numbers. It is the continual distribution of Windows 7 & Office 2010 that has the corporation at that level. Once MS falls below 90% marketshare, they'll never reach that height again.

 

Cat

Agreed, seems that MS is trying to be the software company.  They just came out with Office for Apple Products, but its $100 USD a year.... WHAT?.. WHY?  There are a ton of free options out there that work with Office too.

I think MS will decline some but it will not go away, they own way too much more the underlining technology that powers and moves the industry.  But, I am glad they are getting knocked around right now... about time that happened.


CZARBOOM 
 
"Never Stop Asking Questions, Question Your Environment, Question Your Government, above all Question Yourself.  We all lose when you Stop asking Why?

#15 cat1092

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 12:59 AM

Speaking of EULA's & privacy, read on. This is a credible site (US Dept of Homeland Security) & has a PDF link to the document.

 

http://www.us-cert.gov/security-publications/software-license-agreements-ignore-your-own-risk

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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