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Linux General UEFI install Info (not for Macs)


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#1 NickAu

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 08:51 PM

 

General UEFI install Info (not for Macs)
Caution:
Do not attempt to reinstall Ubuntu except with Something Else. Users are reinstalling Ubuntu and it only shows Ubuntu and they think it will only overwrite the Ubuntu install. If it does now show the Windows then it totally erases drive. Not sure if just user error, installer bug, or Windows reverts to hibernation or fast boot and then the installer cannot see Windows so just assumes you want to install to entire drive.
Backups are very important, see backup section below.

Read more here

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295



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#2 cat1092

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 11:04 PM

Good topic to post. We need to be discussing these things more, as there are many, many dissatisfied Windows 8 users & the upgrade to 8.1 wasn't exactly thrilling for everyone. Including myself.

 

UEFI & Secure Boot is here to stay on pre-built Windows computers, even after Windows 8 is kicked to the curb, hopefully as soon as next year. However, MS has done the damage, users are wanting change & now, not wanting to pay for a new OS, regardless of how low the price. Therefore, the days of the traditional Linux install will gradually fade, as consumers will eventually forced into a decision, repair their old, power hogging PC, or buy a new one for $300-500 & have tons more power, using less electricity.

 

The drawback to a new computer, unless one scores on one of the many Windows 7 computers, back by popular demand, is UEFI & in particular, Secure Boot. As to GPT, there is nothing wrong with that, as one can have many partitions on the drive versus MBR. However, Legacy Boot (MBR) will be needed to revert to in many instances, especially on OEM machines.

 

One last thing to remember here, before doing anything with your Windows 8 computer, be sure to create your recovery disc set, which will take 3 to 5 DVD's & create a backup image of the drive using your favorite backup software. Be sure to create a recovery CD for backup recovery. I state this because one day you may wish to revert back to a pure Windows system, or in the future you may wish to sell/donate it, in which case the original OS should be reinstalled. In the case of selling a computer, it will have more value if Windows is installed.

 

Ubuntu is a great alternative to Windows, as long as the user is willing to learn. Actually it's not so much as to learning Ubuntu (or your favorite Linux OS), it's more about letting go of Windows. Had a consumer never known Windows, Linux would be a walk in the park today. For more, read on.

 

http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

 

Don't let the UEFI/Secure Boot issues intimidate you. There are only three simple steps on most computers to change it back to the old way. However this is OEM specific & the settings will appear different across brands.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#3 TsVk!

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 11:50 PM

there are some Windows visualization issues with UEFI too, if you are running Linux... fixable, but a PITA.



#4 jonuk76

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 05:07 AM

Visualization issues?  Can you expand on that?

 

I've managed to set up a Linux Mint dual boot on a UEFI system that was running Windows 7 (so no Secure Boot) and it went OK but there are some potential pitfalls.  Ubuntu and Linux Mint use the same installer so I assume similar issues exist for both.

 

1) Must be 64 bit version of Linux

2) The installer MUST be booted in UEFI mode.  If not it will probably trash your existing installation and you won't be able to boot to either Linux or Windows.  More about booting the installer in UEFI mode here.

3) The installer did not see the existing Windows 7 installation.  There was no "install alongside existing OS" option.  I did have to use the "Something Else" option, and manually selected the root partition (/), the home partition (/home), the swap partition - all of which I'd created manually in free space using Gparted.   I also had to manually select the existing EFI partition (which Windows had already created).  Importantly, there should only be one EFI partition on the system.

 

I've not had a chance to play around with Windows 8 and Secure Boot yet..


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#5 TsVk!

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 07:23 AM

I can't remember the exact details Jonuk, but briefly...

 

I installed 64 bit Debian on a machine that came with Win 8 pre-loaded (Lenovo M72e). Later when configuring VMWorkstation none of my virtual machines would run. Took me several hours to finally find the BIOS setting... As I didn't even know it would/could create that type of issue beforehand.



#6 jonuk76

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 12:31 PM

Virtualization then as opposed to visualization :wink:


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#7 TsVk!

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 03:32 PM

Virtualization then as opposed to visualization :wink:

As compared to attention to detail. :whistle:



#8 cat1092

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 09:03 PM

Lenovo & HP are the worst about not having Virtualization enabled in the BIOS before shipping to customers. Years ago, with some assistance from Google, I found these controls in the BIOS (setup). HP's setup actually recommends to leave it off unless needed. Don't know why, it wasn't consuming resources when not being used.

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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