Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Installing Mint - 'No root file system'


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove

  • Moderator
  • 5,961 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:06:05 AM

Posted 28 March 2014 - 04:15 PM

I have a very nice desktop running Win 7 64 bit with 2.5Tb of storage on 3 HDD and I am very happy with it. But I have decided to take some steps away from the dark side and at least experiment with Linux - to improve my education if nothing else !

 

I created a partition on my C:\ drive, which I optimistically called 'Linux', and am trying to install Linux Mint into it. I know there is a later version called Petra but, hey, one step at a time, and I have a very pretty install disc for Mint. The problem is I keep running into something I don't understand.

 

There is a screen which says do I wish to install Mint alongside Windows; do I wish to make it the sole OS; or do I wish something different. Selecting 'Something different' I come to a screen listing my partitions and, I think I have selected the 100Gb partition I want to put Mint on, when I click continue I get this error message.:

 

http://imageshack.com/a/img809/3255/4o59.jpg

 

I am aware of the importance of 'Root' in Linux - Root is God - but I have no idea how to get round this, or what I am supposed to do instead.

 

I do know where I want to be. I want a dual boot system with Windows as my primary OS and Mint as my secondary. While that may change in the future, that is where I want to be now so that I can gain practice and experience in Linux.

 

Help and advice gratefully received !

 

Chris Cosgrove



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 21,650 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:01:05 AM

Posted 28 March 2014 - 04:54 PM

I think you got the error because the root file system needs to be EXT3 or EXT4 and yours is NTFS. Here is an excellent video on partitioning linux mint that I have used. About 6 minutes in is the partitioning. You can create 3 separate partitions, / , swap and /home. You would need to delete the 100GB partiton that is formatted NTFS and repartition the unallocated space. You can leave the 100 GB unpartitioned and not formatted then tell Mint you want to install it along side Windows and it will auto create everything using one partition of 100GB.(I think this is the easiest way for dual booting Windows 7 and Mint).



 

Edited by JohnC_21, 28 March 2014 - 05:14 PM.


#3 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove
  • Topic Starter

  • Moderator
  • 5,961 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:06:05 AM

Posted 28 March 2014 - 05:38 PM

Thanks John, I will have a look at that and give it a go over the weekend.

 

You know what they say - 'Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise !' .  Or as my wife would say 'Why don't you look at the manual !'

 

Chris Cosgrove



#4 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 11,738 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:05:05 PM

Posted 28 March 2014 - 08:09 PM

@ Chris.

 

If your pc can run Win7 may I suggest you try Kubuntu, I think its the most Windoze like of all the Linux'es. I live in Australia and went to connect Kubuntu to the net via 3G modem. The installation was so easy I plugged the modem in the OS detected it and gave me options( almost windows like) to set up from a drop down list with all the Australian Phone company's just select the 1 you are with and hit connect. Same with printer after plugging it in and turning it on the OS auto detected it. Similar to when you plug a usb into windows but no driver downloads needed.

 

http://www.kubuntu.org/

 

You know you do not have to install it to HDD?, You can install it to a USB stick, I mean install it like on HDD.

 

Boot from live disc then use the install shortcut on the desktop when you come to where you want to install select the USB. Or. If you have a USB HDD use that, This way if something goes wrong its easy to format and start again and NOT risk the Windows Installation.

 

My suggestion.  Get an old 2.5 inch HDD from a laptop and hook it up to the pc via usb or fit it in the pc and use that.


Edited by NickAu1, 28 March 2014 - 08:20 PM.


#5 buddy215

buddy215

  • BC Advisor
  • 12,614 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West Tennessee
  • Local time:12:05 AM

Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:42 PM

You know you do not have to install it to HDD?, You can install it to a USB stick, I mean install it like on HDD.


 

Boot from live disc then use the install shortcut on the desktop when you come to where you want to install select the USB. Or. If you have a USB HDD use that, This way if something goes wrong its easy to format and start again and NOT risk the Windows Installation.

 

My suggestion.  Get an old 2.5 inch HDD from a laptop and hook it up to the pc via usb or fit it in the pc and use that.

 

I second that....you can make the flash drive persistent....meaning making the OS able to update and a small 4GB of document storage.

An 8GB or larger would serve that purpose.

UNetbootin - Homepage and Downloads

 


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss

A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”


#6 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 11,738 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:05:05 PM

Posted 30 March 2014 - 06:41 PM

I have never used unetbootin to install Linux so do not know how that would work. And I hate "frugal installs" Too much hassle for novices Go the full install.

 

What I do is boot the pc from the ISO and do the normal install thing, But that's just me.

 

I have 1 of these sticks with Unbuntu installed on it.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/SanDisk-Genuine-32GB-Cruzer-FIT-mini-USB-Memory-Flash-Drive-32G-Micro-Stick-Pen-/251289021257?pt=AU_USB_Flash_Drives&hash=item3a81fe2b49

 

Also. If you have a spare Sd Card you can Install to that( Pc must support booting from sd card, If not try this adaptor.)

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/USB-2-0-SD-MMC-Card-Reader-TF-to-Micro-SD-Adapter-/201040613048?pt=AU_Digital_Memory_Card_Readers_Adaptors&hash=item2ecef44eb8


Edited by NickAu1, 30 March 2014 - 06:47 PM.


#7 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,889 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:01:05 AM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 01:37 AM

Nick, in the morning, I'm doing one of those straight Ubuntu installs (14.04 amd64 Final Beta) onto a 32GB USB3 Team SR1 Flash drive. Was considering creating one of those Yumi drives, but I don't need all of that.

 

I prefer a OS that I have plenty of room to update & have a small (1GB) swap partition on the end & not have to worry with creating persistence, as this should be the same as running off of those old WD Passport USB2 drives. Back in 2008, I had one of those, a 160GB model, used 100GB for backup & the rest for a Linux Mint install, Ran it from several computers, including some that weren't mine.

 

My guess is that the USB3 Flash drive would be much faster than the old WD Passport, which had only a SATA1 HDD. And it'll take a long time to fill it up, if ever.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 11,738 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:05:05 PM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 05:23 AM

Looking forward to your feedback on the install.



#9 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove
  • Topic Starter

  • Moderator
  • 5,961 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:06:05 AM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 05:09 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions - I'm still working at it ! 

 

JohnC - that is an excellent video, very well made, and my inability to follow it shows that my understanding is still lacking. I will have to watch it another couple of times.

 

NickAu and buddy215 - the USB idea is worth a look, but I will need to get myself another thumb drive. USB3 would obviously be faster, but I only have USB2 on this machine.

 

Will keep you posted - it must be the stupids !

 

Chris Cosgrove



#10 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,889 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:01:05 AM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 09:33 PM

Looking forward to your feedback on the install.

It worked, but wasn't exactly what I expected. Maybe it was the speed of the Flash drive (HD Tune rates it at around 45MB/sec). Plus after only 20-25 minutes of use, after updating/app installing, it was rather warm. I just bought a 32GB Toshiba that runs at 79.9MB/sec for $16, but that's for encrypting things.

 

After some deeper reading, I discovered that formatting in ext4 will wear these drives out, something to do with journaling. I have a 2.5" USB enclosure & a spare SATA2 notebook drive, that may be the best way to go. It fits in my pocket, has a case to tuck away the everything & will hold up to heavy use. There was another time that I loaded Ubuntu onto a spare HDD in a docking station (WD Caviar Black 750GB, SATA2, 32MB cache) & it outperformed Windows XP that was installed on the native IDE HDD.

 

For my purposes, that just may be a better way to go.

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 31 March 2014 - 09:34 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 11,738 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:05:05 PM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 10:29 PM

 

Plus after only 20-25 minutes of use, after updating/app installing, it was rather warm.

Nothing new there, I think its because of the size of the USB sticks ( dimension's ), Have you ever felt a SSD after doing stuff like that? They get quite warm. A 120 GB SSD is what up to 10 times the size of a 32 GB San Disc micro usb yet it only store's 4 times the info, So yes expect it to warm up.

 

 

I discovered that formatting in ext4 will wear these drives out,

Since SSD's work on a similar principal as a USB stick I wonder if the same is true for SSD's formated in ext4.



#12 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,889 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:01:05 AM

Posted 01 April 2014 - 12:31 AM

 

Since SSD's work on a similar principal as a USB stick I wonder if the same is true for SSD's formated in ext4.

On SSD's, there's a way through the text editor & terminal to lower this risk & activate TRIM. Currently my SSD is running at 25C & HDD at 32C, according to Speccy, which is a neat little app. However, SSD's are built to withstand the enviornment. Mine is designed & tested, by simulation probably, to sustain writes of 80GB/day for 5 years. USB Flash drives, the ones for consumers, aren't designed for lots of heavy writes, while some may last quite some time, the SSD is the winner.

 

Yes, they do fail, however the top tier brands has a much less failure rate than others, such as OCZ, which was bankrupted by it's lack of quality control & lousy firmware. Samsung, a relatively new player in the market, has risen to a 20+% market share in a couple of years. Crucial is still a top brand, as is Intel. I have one of each of those 3 brands, the Crucial & Intel are going on 2 years old, while the Samsung, the fastest, I haven't had long. The SMART data on both the Crucial M4 & Intel states that at current usage, they'll last well into 2022 & 2023, in the same order. Both has 99% of their lifespan & the M4 has been secure erased 4 times & into it's 4th computer. It was also my 1st one.

 

Both of the older SSD's averages over 200MB/sec, while the Samsung runs slightly over 300MB/sec. In part because, the older ones are connected to SATA 2 MB's. When connected to a SATA 3 port on the Dell, they run faster, around 230/240MB/sec. No Flash drive is going to sustain those type of speeds.

 

And they are now outlasting platter drives, many tablets have shipped with them for a few years.

 

Currently, I don't have Linux Mint on an SSD, because it loads fairly fast on the 7200 rpm drives they're on, in part because of all of the security that doesn't have to load.  And if I did install Ubuntu or Mint on a 2.5" drive in an enclosure, it would be faster than that Flash drive, HD Tune tested the drive at an average of 86MB/sec with burst of over 140MB/sec. That Team USB drive doesn't come close.

 

Before installing Windows 8 on my Toshiba, I had Mint 13 on the M4 SSD, it ran great, I would have to go back through my bookmarks, or the forum, to figure out how to enable TRIM, it's easily doable & this greatly reduces wear. Using the terminal, it can be verified that TRIM is running.

 

I need to decide how I want to partition this HDD, then will install Ubuntu 14.04 on it. Probably only need 50GB for the install, allowing some room for a VM in the (home) folder.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#13 TsVk!

TsVk!

    penguin farmer


  • Members
  • 6,230 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Antipodes
  • Local time:04:05 PM

Posted 01 April 2014 - 06:26 AM

JohnC hit it on the head.

 

Mint forum step by step here.



#14 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,889 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:01:05 AM

Posted 01 April 2014 - 09:59 AM

Here are the instructions to install Ubuntu to SSD. This works for Linux Mint & Debian as well.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/ssd

 

This was how I had Mint 13 on a Crucial M4 SSD.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#15 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove
  • Topic Starter

  • Moderator
  • 5,961 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:06:05 AM

Posted 02 April 2014 - 06:31 PM

There is no such thing as a problem, only challenges. But why are there so many challenges ?  And thanks for all the suggestions made so far.

 

I found a spare 250 Gb hard drive which I shoved into my desktop and installed from DVD onto that with the video referenced by JohnC running on my wife's laptop. Set up the hard drive as given in the video and everything seemed to install as it should until it came to the 'Installation complete - re-boot' screen. Super-imposed on this was an error message saying 'Fatal error - Grub failed to create boot loader'

 

After playing with this a few times, I clicked on the 'Ignore' button and went ahead with the re-boot. Where upon, my computer took an attack of the sulks and refused 'No boot media found etc'. It took the Windows repair disc to get it back to booting into Windows, and I can't find any sign of Linux anywhere !

 

I will go back into my BIOS and check for the presence of this hard drive again - it was certainly registering earlier, but what is this 'Grub' problem ?

 

Chris Cosgrove






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users