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2 simple questions about flash drives


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#1 bigbrown411

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 03:35 PM

So, I just installed my SanDisk Cruzer Glide 64gb Flash Drive onto my ASUS computer. The installation went fine it seems. I got a message saying the installation was complete and I was to transfer files onto the flash drives no problems. I just had 2 questions:

 

1) When I opened the drive, there was a folder called "SanDiskSecureAccessV2.0" with 2 adobe documents in it and there was an application file called "SanDiskSecureAccessV2_win." What would happen if I deleted both these documents? Also, does it matter if I leave these files where they are or can I just move them into a different folder? Lastly, should I open the application file or leave it alone? I've had similar things like this occur whenever I install a flash drive and an external hard drive. There's always contents into the drives when I install them. I just want to make sure what these files are for and what I should do with them (if anything).

 

2) When I installed the drive, the drive went under "Hard Disk Drives" under "My Computer." All other flash drives I've installed on my computer went under "Devices with Removable Storage." Is there a reason for this?



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#2 Netghost56

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 04:16 PM

As for #1, most drives nowadays come with proprietary software. You could delete this folder, but next time you format they will reappear. As they probably aren't large files I would just ignore them.

 

#2 is a bit tricky. It may be because the size of the drive puts it into the same arena as hard drives. I do know that some flash drives will do this randomly. It depends on the computer and OS that is accessing it. You can change this by going to Computer, or My Computer, right click affected flash drive, and hit "Properties" at the bottom of the list that shows up, then click the "Hardware" tab. Click on and highlight the affected drive in the list and then click the "Properties" in the bottom of the window. Go to the "Driver" tab in the following window and click on "Uninstall". This should uninstall the driver that is causing the flash drive to read improperly. Now remove the flash drive and re-insert it. After you do this you should see a notice of new drivers being automatically installed for the flash drive. Now, when you go back to view your data it should reappear, unless it or the flash drive has been corrupted in some way. Hope this helps.

 

^^^credit to Tom's Hardware, but I have done this before and can vouch that it works.



#3 Trakeen

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 11:15 PM

#2 has been a nightmare for me for quite some time.  Apparently, any flash drives over 16 GB (correct me if I'm wrong), and marked, on the packageing or the drive itself, as windows 8 compatible are labeled as hard drives in windows 8 / 8.1.

 

We've had problems with this at the shop I work with when we were trying to create an HP restoration image on a flash drive that was labeled windows 8 compatible.  Because windows doesn't mark the drive as removable storage, but an actual hard drive.  I think I spent 2 hours researching this problem to finally find out what was happening.

 

I'll have to try Netghost56's suggestion and see what happens.



#4 smax013

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 10:09 AM

1) When I opened the drive, there was a folder called "SanDiskSecureAccessV2.0" with 2 adobe documents in it and there was an application file called "SanDiskSecureAccessV2_win." What would happen if I deleted both these documents? Also, does it matter if I leave these files where they are or can I just move them into a different folder? Lastly, should I open the application file or leave it alone? I've had similar things like this occur whenever I install a flash drive and an external hard drive. There's always contents into the drives when I install them. I just want to make sure what these files are for and what I should do with them (if anything).


As noted by another poster, most external drive usually come with some "software included". The software will vary from drive to drive, but common programs are backup programs or drive encryption/lock programs…there may be others.

From the name, it sounds like program to setup either a specific folder or the whole drive to be encrypted or locked. As noted by the other poster, there should be no problem deleting the folder, documents, and/or application…unless you want to use the encryption/locking function. If you do decide to delete folder, I would suggest you copy it/back it up to your hard drive in case you want to use it in the future…although it appears you can download it again from the SanDisk site: http://kb.sandisk.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/2399/ .

#5 newburydave

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 09:42 AM

My identity protection service sent me an email about the Russian data penetration. In it they said that thumb-drives can be turned into data-mining drones without the user being aware of it. One suggested fix for this vulnerability was to use the security SW that comes on the newer drives and if not present download a thumb-drive security program.

 

I have two new SanDisc 64gb drives. Does anyone know if this security SW:

 

1 Works well

 

2. Is not itself spamware or spyware

 

basically is it safe to use?

 

My ID protection company also said we should immediately change all of our vital log in information (passwords) especially on any financial or commercial accounts where we have saved CC info.

 

Do any of you have experience with the new SmartPhone password randomizer apps that Microsoft is pushing?

 

They make it sound like a digital one time pad for our security information.

 

dave 



#6 rp88

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 07:05 PM

i've had exactly the two things you describe in your first post many times. I often use sandisk flash drives and they all have that piece of software pre-installed on them, i just delete it. if i want to put something encrypted on a usb drive i would use 7z to put the file in an encrypted archive then copy the archive to the usb. deleting the exe file will do no harm at all, the rest of the stuff in the folder can also go, the pdf is instructions for the exe file and if memory serves me there is a .txt troubleshooting or license file in their also. that software on the sandisk usb is not malicious but isn't very useful really.  i have also had the "issue" of it calling itself a hard drive not a removable disc, but it still has options for safe ejection and it still works fine. this has happened to me on an xp computer as well as windows 8.

 

as for newburydave's recent post such evil devices do exist but it is unlikely that a genuine sandisk usb would be infected like that. make sure to get it in a reputable highstreet shop and that you see the packet isn't opened and you should be fine. the software on the sandisk won't help protect your pc from other malicious USB devices, it will only encrypt the data you put on the usb, your only solution to protect from such attacks is to ensure plug and play is turned off, even then it is not a perfect solution as recent developments show some devices can attack your machine without needing plug and play or any kind of exe file, this was in the news recently discussing edited firmware amongst other flaws in the usb format. the software on the sandiscs will be safe (as long as they are genuine one's from a reputable shop and you saw the packet hadn't been opened before you bought them) but won't help with protect against attack, if you want to encrypt stuff on a usb drive , a good idea if you have to carry confidential files around, 7z is probably better as i believe it will have a stringer encryption type than the sandisk software. as for securing online accounts i suggest not a random password generator but another type of "1 time pad", 2 step verification, having a password in your head AND a text sent to your phone really improves account security. 


Back on this site, for a while anyway, been so busy the last year.

My systems:2 laptops, intel i3 processors, windows 8.1 installed on the hard-drive and linux mint 17.3 MATE installed to USB




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