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Adv Hardware problem (computer freeze on setup)


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#1 philbbjr

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 11:13 AM

I have an ASUS republic of gamers G51jx laptop. It's almost 4 years old now and a month ago the computer would turn "on" but not load or if it did make it the login screen, it would just freeze. Everytime that happened, the hard drive icon would turn off.

So, I was like "I'll just replace the hard drive, reload windows, and everything will be great." Anyways, I changed the hard drive and added more thermal compound to my heat sink (long overdue). Then I reloaded windows without an issue.

BUT when it started getting ready to "prepare my desktop", it did the same freezing issue and the hard drive icon went out. Last year, ASUS replaced/repaired my motherboard from another issue, so I hope that it's okay. But what else could have gone wrong?

Does anyone think the RAM may be an issue or the CPU?

 

specs:

CPU- Intel i7 720QM

6 GB RAM

NEW 500gb momentus Seagate hard drive

NVIDIA GTS 360M

 

Any advice or recommended checks would be great.



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#2 zingo156

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 12:01 PM

It could be just about any hardware component including ram. I recommend ruling out ram by running memtest86: either burn to a disc or use a flash drive (backup flash drive data first it will require format). Source: http://www.memtest.org/#downiso

 

Disc version: Download - Pre-Compiled Bootable ISO (.zip)

 

Flash drive version: Download - Auto-installer for USB Key (Win 9x/2k/xp/7)

 

You could also try to boot to a linux distro such as mint: http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php

If it will not boot to linux, hardware is the likely suspect.

 

If in the bios you can disable the add in discrete video card that would be another thing to try. I have seen bad video chipsets cause both the freeze at login and failure during windows installation. You can take out wifi cards and other easily accessible hardware as well.

 

I am not sure if this will work but, you could tap F8 after powering on to get to the boot menu options and try to load in safe mode.


Edited by zingo156, 28 March 2014 - 12:03 PM.

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#3 philbbjr

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 12:33 PM

Thank you so much for the quick response.

 

I will work on testing out the RAM as soon as possible and report back.

 

I will also try the Linux boot eventually, but I figured since I reloaded windows from my original recovery CDs on a new hard drive, it would eliminate any problems due to that.

 

I unfortunately couldn't disable the video card in BIOS, and I can't start in safe mode because it hasn't "set up the desktop" yet.  I guess I could put my old hard drive back in a boot to safe mode if I wanted.  Every now and then I could get into safe mode on it.  So maybe that hard drive is actually still okay.



#4 zingo156

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 12:47 PM

EDIT, the other thing I might recommend trying is to use an actual OEM of windows disc to reload.

 

The old drive may still be ok, you can test the hard drive with a surface scan utility, I use MHDD. here are the instructions for that test:

 

Before running this test it would be a good idea to backup any data that you cannot afford to lose. This test uses the hard drive at 100%. If the drive is failing or has problems it is possible for the drive to fail suddenly especially during heavy use as this test will do. It is unlikely but still I recommend backing files up to be safe. Here are the instructions to run the test:

 

The first step will be to burn MHDD to a disc as an image (cd preferably). MHDD Can be found here: http://hddguru.com/software/2005.10.02-MHDD/

After burning the disc, restart the laptop and start tapping f2 or f1 or delete right away to get into the bios. There you should see System Configuration, expand that by clicking the + button. In that list there should be something called Sata operation. (Sata Operation may also be by itself in that first screen list)

Click on sata operation and take note of the current setting to the right it will probably be set to AHCI it will need to be switched back to this after MHDD is done running. Select ATA, compatibility or ide mode and then click apply. Save and exit the bios, or if apply was the only option you can use Ctrl+Alt+Delete to restart.

Now with the burned disc in the drive after a restart, start tapping F12, F9, or Esc on the keyboard. This will bring up the boot options menu. Select cd/dvd/cd-rw drive and hit enter.

If this worked correctly and booted to mhdd you should see a screen that says Microsoft windows 98 startup menu. You can let the timer run out or just hit enter on option (2 . Start computer without SCSI support) in that menu .

Now you should see a screen with numbers, most of these will not have any device listed behind them but one number should for example on my dell computer number 6 has WDC WD1600BEVT-75A23T0… and at the end a number in white which is the size of the drive.

Example: If your drive is a 500gb I would expect that number in white to be somewhere around 500,107,862,016 or close to. Find the correct drive to test then on the keyboard type the number in front of the drive (in my case it was 6) and then hit enter.

Now you should have a screen with MHDD> and a blinking cursor.

Now hit F4 on the keyboard 2 times and this will start scanning the hard drive.

You should be able to see the computer start scanning, each block represents one sector on the hard drive. What we are looking for will show up on the right side of the screen.

There is a list on the right which shows numbers:

<3

<10

<50

<150ms

Etc…

 

Anything below the <150ms is a slow sector or a problem sector. Slow sectors <500 or >500 will slow down the computer. If there are a lot of these the drive should be replaced. Even new drives have around 3-4 slow sectors so if it has no more than 10 I would say the drive is ok.

Also if you have any at the end that were marked as UNC this means the drive has uncorrectable errors and the hard drive should probably be replaced.

Basically if you have any sectors that are below <150 (green) let me know and if possible the total number of them.

If all of the sectors were ok and fell within the range of:

<3

<10

<50

<150ms

Then the hard drive is ok, if there are only a few (no more than 10 sectors that are slow <500 or >500) the hard drive should be ok to use.

NOTE: that if there are many slow sectors one after another or you start having error after error the drive is in bad shape and I recommend ending the test. To end the test hit the Esc key.

After you are done testing you will need to go back into the bios by restarting the computer and tapping F2, F1, Delete (or whatever key gets you into bios). Go back to Sata Operation and change it back to the default which probably was AHCI.

Then restart and the computer should boot again.

(If you are getting a blue screen and the computer restarts go back into the bios and confirm that Sata Operation is set to what it was before changing it to ATA).


Edited by zingo156, 28 March 2014 - 12:52 PM.

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#5 philbbjr

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 08:21 PM

I completed memtest and it couldn't find any errors with my RAM, so that's unfortunate for our problem solving ideas.

 

The only disks I have are the ones I created when I bought the computer, so I'd have to get an OEM disk.

 

What are some of the other components that can be removed?  If I remove my video card, will my computer still boot up?

 

I really hope it's not the CPU.  The next thing I'm going to try is booting with Linux Mint and see how that goes.



#6 philbbjr

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 09:43 PM

Well, the hard drive was definitely not the problem.  I loaded it into a friend's laptop that had a broken hard drive and it loaded everything up immediately.  So I lost 70 bucks there but I guess he will get a nice new hard drive to fix his issue haha.

 

I'm still messing around with my computer trying to get some kind of life out of it now.  I can boot to safe mode on my old hard drive if there is anything helpful I could diagnose from there.



#7 zingo156

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 09:51 AM

If you can get into safe mode that may help out in this case. In theory you can take out the discrete video card and it should make use of the onboard video chipset only. BE EXTREMELY careful if you take it apart and do not have experience. This might be a task best left to a pc repair shop.

 

You can take out all non essentail hardware but first lets try and figure out what is going on from safe mode.

 

Please run who crashed and speccy from safe mode:

 

We need to analyze your operating system's crash dump files to further diagnose what could possibly be crashing your computer system.

Please download Who Crashed? and save it to your desktop.

Double click whocrashedSetup.exe and choose Run

On Windows Vista, 7, 8 and 8.1 machines, when User Account Control asks if you wish to install this program, say YES to install the program on your computer.

Program can also be installed by right click and choosing Run As An Administrator.

On the next screen choose Next and accept the agreement.

Install the program in it's default location C:\Program Files\WhoCrashed (If your primary drive is different from C:, choose your primary drive.)

Choose Next and allow program to create a Start Menu Folder called WhoCrashed and click Next.

Allow program to create desktop icon and click Next.

Now Click Install.

Once the program is installed on your computer system, look for the WhoCrashed icon.png desktop Icon and double click it.

Accept the User Account Control request and the program will open on your screen and should look something like this.

whocrashed.png

Next, Click the Analyze button. analyze.png

An Information Window should appear on your screen prompting you to scroll down your screen.

If a report was generated we would like to have a look at this report.

To do this, click File analyze.png and then choose Export.

Save as WhoCrashedOutput.htm to your desktop.

Open WhoCrashedOutput.htm and copy and paste all of the contents from System Information (local) and Crash Dump Analysis and the Conclusion into your next reply.

 

 

  • Go to Piriform's website, and click the big download.png button.
     
  • Next, click Download from Piriform.com (the FileHippo link requires an extra click). Or if you want to use a portable version of Speccy (which doesn't require installation), click the builds page link and download the portable version.
     
  • You will now be asked where you want to save the file. The best place to put it is the Desktop, as it will be easy to find later.
     
  • After the file finishes downloading, you are ready to run Speccy. If you downloaded the installer, simply double-click on it and follow the prompts until installation is complete. If you downloaded the portable version, you will need to unzip it before use. Right-click the ZIP file and click Extract all. Click Next. Open up the extracted folder and double-click on Speccy.
     
  • Once inside Speccy, it will look similar to this (with your computer's specifications, of course):
    p22004369.gif
  • Now, at the top, click File > Publish Snapshot
  • You will see the following prompt:
    p22004371.gif
  • Click Yes > then Copy to Clipboard
    p22004372.gif
  • Now, once you are back in the forum topic you are posting in, click the p22004370.gif button. Right-click in the empty space of the Reply box and click Paste. Then, click Add Reply below the Reply box.
  • Congrats! You have just posted your specs!

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