Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

practice on water soaked laptop


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 belcant2

belcant2

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:China/U.K.
  • Local time:06:37 PM

Posted 28 March 2014 - 12:04 AM

My sister got a new laptop only to have her little boy spill water on it. It doesn't work of course but I am curious which parts are most likely to be the main victims so I can practice my skills trying changing components. Ways the best way to check each component?

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 zingo156

zingo156

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,345 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:37 AM

Posted 28 March 2014 - 09:22 AM

Generally the keyboard and mainboard are affected the most (mainboard is the largest part covering most of the laptop internally). Any component can be affected and the only way to know for certain is to test each component individually. Hard drives can be tested by plugging into any computer with the supported hardware: sata, ide, etc. Mouse and keyboard would require a new mainboard (if the old one does not work). Cpu, ram can be tested by using memtest86 and prime95. DVD/CD drives would need to be tested with both dvd and cd's if it has a blue ray drive, test with a blue ray movie etc.

 

After water damage, if a computer turns on, I test every device it has, external video outputs, all usb ports, etc. I also run diagnostic utilities to test stability. Memtest86, MHDD (hard drive test), prime95 (cpu + ram), furmark (video chipset), etc.


If I am helping you with a problem and I have not responded within 48 hours please send me a PM.

#3 dicke

dicke

    Paraclete


  • Members
  • 2,196 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charlotte, NC
  • Local time:06:37 AM

Posted 30 March 2014 - 02:06 PM

Hi,

If she just got the computer and it is under warranty I'd be letting the vendor get the practice. Opening a computer under warranty will void the warranty. Then all of the repairs will be on your $$.

As mentioned letting it dry completely before applying power is a must. If the laptop was shut down at the time of the accident there may be hope. But, there again I'd be taking it back to see if the warranty will fix it.

Keep us posted


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#4 belcant2

belcant2
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:China/U.K.
  • Local time:06:37 PM

Posted 30 March 2014 - 07:57 PM

Yes, your right the most logical course of action would be to return it to the vendor only the repairs were supposedly more than the cost of the computer so she opted for a new one. It's not an expensive machine, and because I want to get skills , I don't mind paying out. As today it seems that most people use laptops more than desktops then this would be useful. I will keep you posted once I return to U.K. to see her as I am in China now.

I really appreciate the feedback.



#5 dicke

dicke

    Paraclete


  • Members
  • 2,196 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charlotte, NC
  • Local time:06:37 AM

Posted 30 March 2014 - 08:50 PM

Hi,

Laptop repair is a great way to gain patience. It also requires steady hands and good eyesight. [been there done that]

Enjoy. Have a safe trip back and stay well and surf safe


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#6 belcant2

belcant2
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:China/U.K.
  • Local time:06:37 PM

Posted 30 March 2014 - 09:54 PM

I am very new at this, I am still not clear on the tools I will need (physical tools). As I understand, memtest86 and prime95 are programs and how can one test a cpu in a computer that doesnt work? 



#7 dicke

dicke

    Paraclete


  • Members
  • 2,196 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Charlotte, NC
  • Local time:06:37 AM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 06:55 AM

Hi,

The tools I kept close were all small. Flat and Phillips screwdrivers, small torx drivers, a magnetic pickup [great for finding small objects that tend to want to migrate to the floor]. Access to a system where I can bring up manuals with diagrams and instructions. A system that works for testing components is always nice. Some manufacturers run schools where you can learn how to repair their equipment.

Keep us posted


Stay well and surf safe [stay protected]

Dick E


#8 Kilroy

Kilroy

  • BC Advisor
  • 3,461 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Launderdale, MN
  • Local time:04:37 AM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 02:59 PM

The only warranty that would cover water damage is a warranty that includes accidental damage.  You cannot lie about water damage as there are indicators on the inside of the machine that will show that they have been in contact with liquids.

 

My experience with water damage is that if the machine doesn't turn on you buy a new one as the cost of repairs is more than the machine.

 

Normally the hard drive and RAM can be reused, but most of the rest of it will not work.  The CPU might be okay also, but odds are  that won't matter to you.



#9 mjd420nova

mjd420nova

  • Members
  • 1,881 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:37 AM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 07:28 PM

Warranty should cover ANY damage within the first 30 days.  California consumer laws allow the return within 30 days.  I have a daughter that is probe to this, the original Dell got a bath with Coke, it took a week and complete disassembly to clean and reassemble with success.  Her new Dell suffered the same event inside two weeks and they replaced the entire unit, no charge.  Everything needs disassembly, remove all boards and connectors.  I clean everything with warm, clear water and a soft bristle paintbrush cut to one inch bristles.  A complete wasj down with a NON-residue electronic cleaner (CRC Lectraclean or Blue Shower) and let dry for a day.  Close attention to connectors and mating cables are clean.  Don't skip the underside, puddles form under the main board.



#10 belcant2

belcant2
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 13 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:China/U.K.
  • Local time:06:37 PM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 08:21 PM

Thanks to everyone, you have all been very helpful. It looks like your lucky in the U.S.. This kind of damage is not covered in U.K. :(

I guessed as much about the hard drive but would have thought otherwise with the RAM. So you have to use another system to test individual parts like the CPU? Isnt there a tool which can test parts whilst still on the damaged device itself? 



#11 mjd420nova

mjd420nova

  • Members
  • 1,881 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:02:37 AM

Posted 31 March 2014 - 10:06 PM

Most of the tools for testing mainboard assemblies are at the mfgr as part of their QC process.  Most failed returned units will be bench tested individually and bad parts replaced, failed items returned to QC for disposition.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users