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Networking over standard phone wiring


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#1 stevansky

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 11:05 PM

Some years ago I added a building/shed about 200' or less from my home. At that time I ran a 8 conductor phone line underground to it so I could have a phone/intercom. I was wondering if there is some way I can run data from my network hub at home over this cable instead of having to bury Cat 5 out to it which is no longer practical because of obstacles that weren't present initially. Thanks!



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#2 CaveDweller2

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 03:13 AM

You can do it but I doubt you'd get more than 10MBs. You can search google, I saw a few links explaining how to do it.

 

But I'd so wireless. I'd get a wireless router as close to that side of your place as you can, it should cover that distance. But you might need to set up an access point out there.


Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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#3 stevansky

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 10:56 AM

Thanks for the input. I had googled it before I posted my query, then afterward went back and googled it somemore. It's surprising how little information there is on this topic. The vast majority of articles refer to power line and coaxial configurations using various commercial adaptors. I did finally find one that referenced using old phone wire with nothing more than some keystone jacks and patch cables. You are right. I will be lucky to get around 10Mbs with this arrangement, but as I have DSL this actually exceeds what my provider delivers anyway! :hysterical: Thanks again and have a great weekend.



#4 CaveDweller2

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 01:28 PM

Well the problem is the wire. Cat3 is what phone line is basically and it's max speed was 10Mbs. If you did it with Cat5, you could get 100Mbs. But I think wireless would work better and wouldn't cost you too much. Specially if you could get your hands on a couple used routers. Flash in new firmware, much harder to read how to do it than actually doing it, a few settings and bam wireless all over the place =) 

 

Have a great weelend yourself. unless it's gonna snow then HAHA =)


Edited by CaveDweller2, 28 March 2014 - 01:28 PM.

Hope this helps thumbup.gif

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#5 thephoton

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 10:26 AM

CaveDweller2 is correct, your issue is the wire itself.

 

To replace one simlar setup we used the existing phone wire as the pull string for new real string. Then using the new string we pulled two Cat 5's and a new pull string - always leave a string for the next pull, you never know when you will need it. We got lucky that he had buried the original cable in a conduit just big enough to fit the new cables. 

 

We also did the wireless setup between two offices at almost 2,000 feet, but over the long term we had issues with the signal quality due to trees, vehicles and new Wifi setups in the signal path. The trick to getting it to work at that distance was the routers. We found routers with external antennas and then changed those out for some after market high gain directional antennas. Just make sure you get the right connectors for both ends and you may need to make some pig tails to connect them. New firmware also allowed us to boost the signal a little and not fry the radios. Made our nightly off site backup possible






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