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Can I save my windows onto a disc and install linux?


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#1 matttexas17

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 09:37 PM

So I want to try linux, without deleting my windows 8. Is there a way I can save my windows 8 onto an external harddrive, and then install linux? How would that work? 



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#2 1PW

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 09:51 PM

So I want to try linux, without deleting my windows 8. Is there a way I can save my windows 8 onto an external harddrive, and then install linux? How would that work? 

 

Absolutely. That's an image of your system, when we say we're re-imaging our system or doing a bare metal restore. Even if you were not going to try a Linux distro, you would be well advised to have periodic full images of your system for catastrophes.

 

BTW - perhaps you might want to look at a dual boot system and have the best of both worlds.


Edited by 1PW, 25 March 2014 - 09:52 PM.

All viruses are malware but not all malware are viruses and if the malware doesn't self replicate it just isn't a virus.


#3 NickAu

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 10:51 PM


 

So I want to try linux, without deleting my windows 8

You can try any linux without having to install it.

Just download the Linux .iso and burn it to dvd/cd ( in windows 7 just click the iso and follow the prompts)

Set your pc to boot from dvd and enjoy

 

Video's Not my work.

How to use an Ubuntu Live CD

http://youtu.be/I5DeLLXd5gs

Or

You can install Linux to usb stick.

Its exactly the same as installing to HDD. Just select the usb during install.

 

 

How to Create a Bootable Ubuntu 13.10 USB Flash Drive

http://youtu.be/CFeri7UiYNs

Both these method's will not affect your windows system

 

 

I can save my windows 8 onto an external harddrive,  How would that work?

You should do this anyway .

how to use clonezilla

http://youtu.be/LS6VhLDw-io


Edited by NickAu1, 25 March 2014 - 11:06 PM.

Arch Linux .
 
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#4 cat1092

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 11:53 PM

Absolutely! And as both members above me has stated, you should be backing up your computer anyway. Macrium Reflect Free version will do a fine job of imaging Windows 8. Note that all backup apps aren't quite "Windows 8" or "GPT" ready yet, these partitions has to be imaged right or they won't restore properly if needed.

 

Plus be sure to create your recovery disk set, you'll need 3 to 5 DVD's & many will allow to do this on a 16GB USB Flash drive. I do both.

 

You may wish to try out more than one Linux OS or "distro" to find the one that suits your needs by Live DVD, which is the same as your install media. Some users likes the basics, others wants more eye candy.

 

Speaking of Windows 8, did the computer ship with that OS installed? If so, then you're going to need to disable Secure Boot (in the UEFI BIOS setup). The procedure will vary with different OEM's, so there's not an all-in-one solution. However, if you're familiar with going into the BIOS & changing things, it's no big deal. It would be best to write on paper any changes made. You may wish to refer to your docs on your model online, as this isn't likely to be in the owner's manual.

 

Good Luck & enjoy Linux!

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#5 NickAu

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:16 AM

 

Speaking of Windows 8, did the computer ship with that OS installed? If so, then you're going to need to disable Secure Boot (in the UEFI BIOS setup).

Good point I forgot about that. Im getting old.


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#6 cat1092

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:43 AM

 

Good point I forgot about that. Im getting old.

Yeah, me too!

 

When I bought the XPS 8700 in my specs below, it shipped with Windows 8. The other 2 laptops that I have Windows 8.1 on as a tri-boot with Windows 7 & Linux Mint, I grabbed when on promo for $40. I had read of all of this Secure Boot stuff, but didn't realize what it meant until I tried running a Mint 16 Live DVD on it. No go.

 

Nor could I install Windows 7 on the new SSD that I had purchased for it, that's when I had to go to Dell Support & seek assistance. Fortunately, my model was covered on their forum, so was able to print the instructions. Just disabling Secure Boot allows for a install DVD or Live DVD to run, to install to drive, a couple of other settings had to be changed. Had to switch to ACHI & Legacy (MBR).

 

As long as there are proper instructions, I have no problems making these changes. Naturally I was a little nervous, being this was my first GPT/Secure Boot system to deal with.

 

There is a common conception in the Linux community that Secure Boot, as implemented by MS, was to lock out Linux installs, or any dual boot. It's a side effect of the UEFI, that's intended to stop malware from loading at boot. Red Hat & I believe Ubuntu now has signed keys so that if one wants to dual boot in Secure Boot mode, with GPT partitioning, it'll work. However, not all Linux OS's are going to do this, something in regards to paying for a signed key, that Linus Torvalds is screaming bloody murder over.

 

Note that these signed keys may be only in paid subscription Linux OS's, Red Hat isn't free anyway & Ubuntu also has a paid support version, that would cover the cost of the signed key.

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 26 March 2014 - 12:52 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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