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What Temp is too low?


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#1 Sogin

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 07:30 AM

For Computers hardware what temp is too low to turn it on? I keep it in my attic which I heat every day/night but it is Woodstove, so no me= no heat. And with this crappy freaking year and it staying colder for 2 times longer than it's freaking supposed to the room gets cold daily, but how cold is too cold?


Edited by Sogin, 24 March 2014 - 07:35 AM.


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#2 myrti

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 07:47 AM

Hi,

 

as long as it's above freezing temperatures I think you should be fine.. If it gets below the freezing point you may need to worry about condensation accumulating on the hardware and causing short circuits.

 

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#3 Sogin

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:11 AM

Ah, alright. Thanks a lot.



#4 buddy215

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:12 AM

Agree with myrti.....you would want to allow a computer to warm up and dry out for a time if you are bringing it from a cold area to

a much warmer area.....causing dew/ condensation to form.....or the opposite...hot to cold.


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#5 Sogin

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:23 AM

Well, it never goes to freezing levels, just cold. So, if it needs to be freezing to affect anything I should be okay. =P



#6 dikbozo

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:38 PM

I forgot and left my laptop over night in the vehicle a couple of weeks ago. The temperature went well below the freezing point. All was well as I warmed the el cheapo laptop up slowly to room temperature before powering it up and I did not plug in the charger.



#7 OldPhil

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 10:23 AM

I feel you are more than likely Ok, heating with wood makes for nice dry conditions.  I heated with wood and then coal for a number of years I had to use a humidifier it was so dry.


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#8 mjd420nova

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 06:02 PM

LCD displays are more prone to failure than the older CRT or plasma displays.  Most other electronics loves it when it's cold.  I've run some laptops and desktops along with mechanical scan units as low as minus 55 degrees below zero F.  Battery packs work better too.






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