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Is it worth converting my XP computer to Linux?


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#1 cmptrgy

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 03:58 PM

I want to convert my XP computer to Linux

 

I have been viewing some of the Linux recommendations and I find it just as daunting if not more than selecting a Windows OS but that’s ok

--- I plan on considering Lubuntu, Linux Mint, or Zoris OS according to

http://www.coolcoder.in/2014/03/3-immediate-linux-alternatives-for-xp.html

 

My XP computer is

Dell Dimension 3000 Desktop running XP Pro SP3

--- Intel Celeron 2.80 GHz processor, 30 GB hard drive, 2 GB RAM

--- The computer is hard wired for Internet access but I have a wireless Netgear NR1000 v2 for 3 other computers to work wirelessly

--- If I use a wireless USB adapter on this Dell Dimension 3000, will Linux work with it?

What browsers do I use in Linux?

--- I’ve always used IE.

--- It appears to me I could use Firefox or Chrome

I use Microsoft Office 2000 with Microsoft’s Office Compatibility Pack without any problems interactive the 200 or so volunteers and appropriate organizations at the non-profit organization I volunteer at

--- Even if Linux doesn’t accommodate Microsoft Office, I’m willing to learn what is offered based on what flavor of Linux I decide on

I use Yahoo for email & will be looking into Windows Live mail on my Windows 7 computers

--- Will Linux allow me to continue using those email clients?

For printers I have an HP OfficeJet 4500 AIO & an HP DeskJet 950C printer

--- Will Linux allow me to continue using those printers?

My computers are all 32-bits right now

--- Do I have to factor in 32-bit vs. 64-bit in Linux

I see so many times that Linux isn’t subject to being infected at least not normally

--- However what security programs should I consider for Linux just the same?



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#2 rburkartjo

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 04:55 PM

cmp

 

i would opt for linux mint

the wireless might not sure

use chrome

use libreoffice  

your hp printer should work no problem. never had a problem using hp with linux

just stay with 32 bit

also install ufw for linux. that should keep you safe. you dont really need a virus scanner but if you want you can install clamtk

 

 

another option you could buy a 32 or 64 gig usb and put linux on it. then keep xp . use tinywall for your firewall http://tinywall.pados.hu/

and baidu antivirus http://antivirus.baidu.com/en/  they have pledged to keep support for xp  http://antivirus.baidu.com/news/2014-03-10/1396699174.html

 

i use the above from win7 on a separate partitions.

 

also after you dowload whatever linux distro you want. boot up into the live cd and see if your wireless router will work


Edited by rburkartjo, 23 March 2014 - 05:16 PM.

quote:He that would live in peace & at ease, Must not speak all he knows,nor judge all he sees.'

#3 NickAu

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 07:41 PM

 

you could buy a 32 or 64 gig usb and put linux on it

That's how I boot my Linux.

 

 

If I use a wireless USB adapter on this Dell Dimension 3000, will Linux work with it?

Yes, It should. When you boot from Cd/DVD you should see wireless connection/s in the top right hand corner( Unbuntu) click the little wireless icon to connect it will pop up a box asking for the password, Enter the password and hit connect.



#4 cmptrgy

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 08:07 PM

Thanks for those ideas

I find it interesting that I could put Linux onto a USB but since I don't plan on doing any more XP once Apr 8 gets here I don't think I'll be doing that.

I'll still have my 3 Windows computers (2 Windows 7 & 1 Windows Vista) that work just fine

I'll take the time to learn Linux and I look forward to it 



#5 buddy215

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 08:48 PM

I have the same Dell computer with 2 GB of memory...same as yours. I have it as a backup and Ubuntu is installed on it.

How did you end up with a 30GB hdd? Mine is 80GB.

 

I would suggest you get another hdd and keep the XP on the present drive. Though those IDE drives are more costly today.

Expect to pay at least $60 for an 80 GB drive. Looking a bit today on Amazon I saw sellers offering them for much less....they're used but not so stated.

 

If you are not in a hurry to install Linux, Ubuntu's next LTS (long term support...5 years) will be released on April 17.

I'm still using the 10.04 and plan to bite the bullet and upgrade next month.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#6 cat1092

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:57 PM

Yes, it's worth it! I have a Dimension 2400 that has Linux Mint 13 (Mate) on it, on a separate HDD from XP. Mint 13 runs circles around XP Home SP3. I upgraded the stock 2.4 Celeron CPU to a 3.06 H/T Northwood, which gave it a much needed boost. However being that you're at 2.8GHz, you could expect to see less of an impact.

 

Good that you do have 2GB RAM installed, I upgraded from 512MB to 2GB at what I felt to be a steep price for DDR 3200 RAM.

 

Linux Mint will normally find the right drivers for your system, for best results, have the accessories that you use plugged in & turned on, as the setup downloads & install drivers during system install. HP printers are a favorite of many Linux users, normally it installs itself fine.

 

And for best possible compatibiltiy, go for 32 bit, as 64 bit versions may require advanced configuration, though this has improved in recent releases. 32 bit would be more suitable for your PC anyway.

 

I've never tried installing Windows Live Mail on Linux OS's, so I can't vouch as to whether it will work or not. However, there is a Skype for Linux package in the Software Manager. Libre Office is standard with Mint. So is Firefox, though Chrome is faster. You can also get Chromium (unbranded Google Chrome) from the Software Manager. Both are faster & more secure than the latest IE for XP (IE8) anyway. IE7 was much better on XP in terms of resource usage anyway.

 

Lastly, if you're considering another HDD, stay away from the "White Label" ones advertised as new ones on eBay & other sites. They are lookalikes of popular HDD's, possibly in the actual casings, but are refurbished & doesn't have the performance of a new HDD by far. There are still a few 80GB WD Caviar Black IDE, 7200 rpm HDD's on eBay for low prices that will perform great on it. Or if you no longer desire to use XP, backup what you have (just in case) & install to the HDD already there. Linux installs typically doesn't take as much space as Windows, unless one is running virtual machines from it, which I don't feel that you'll be doing on that PC.

 

I feel that with time, you'll come to enjoy Linux, as well as give a few years of life to your PC.

 

PS: After researching, your PC will only run a 32 bit OS anyway, according to your CPU specs.

 

http://ark.intel.com/products/27182/Intel-Celeron-Processor-2_80-GHz-128K-Cache-400-MHz-FSB

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 23 March 2014 - 11:02 PM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#7 NickAu

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 11:17 PM

 

I'm still using the 10.04 and plan to bite the bullet and upgrade next month.

Linux users just do not like updating for some reason. Like they say "if it aint broke don't fix it" One of my Puppy's still runs FireFox 12.

 

And I have a copy of Linux satanic 666.9 LOL it was made in 2011

http://www.techworld.com.au/article/385952/ubuntu_linux_satanic_edition_666_9_review/


Edited by NickAu1, 23 March 2014 - 11:19 PM.


#8 cat1092

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 12:13 AM

In some cases, the user is restricted to 10.04 (Ubuntu), due to the PAE requirements imposed beginning with 12.04. Fortunately, Mint 13 LTS, based on Ubuntu 12.04, didn't enforce the PAE requirement on that release, but has done so since Mint 14.

 

Oddly, this restriction was imposed around the same timeframe as the NX requirement, in addition to PAE, to install Windows 8. Plus, Ubuntu's GUI (the user interface) changed also during this time. That hurt Ubuntu badly in the Linux rankings & for all intents & purposes, handed the #1 position to Linux Mint, a relatively newcomer debuting in 2006. Going from the latest kid on the block in 2006 to the top of the charts in 2012 was amazing, to say the least. Actually, accoring to DistroWatch, the torch was passed in 2011 by a narrow, but still decisive margin.

 

Note that not all of today's Mint offerings are based upon Ubuntu (they have a Debian edition) & future releases are reported to rely on it even less.

 

Current rankings are on the right side of the page, one can select the timeframe or year to see past rankings. Select 2011 & you'll see that Mint was pulling away. Today, it's almost a 2 to 1 Mint vs Ubuntu usershare. Ubuntu has gained slightly in the 7 day rankings due to the 14.04 Beta 1 release. Mint has yet to release a RC, but is expected to introduce a new LTS by end of May.

 

http://distrowatch.com/

 

Yes, a Linux OS is the best OS for that Dimension 3000. And free.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#9 pane-free

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 07:18 AM

In some cases, the user is restricted to 10.04 (Ubuntu), due to the PAE requirements imposed beginning with 12.04. Fortunately, Mint 13 LTS, based on Ubuntu 12.04, didn't enforce the PAE requirement on that release, but has done so since Mint 14. . . .


Note that not all of today's Mint offerings are based upon Ubuntu (they have a Debian edition) & future releases are reported to rely on it even less.

 

Looks like the Mint devs are getting smart -- to start on a road away from Canonical.  It's about time.  I was starting to move away from Mint more and more. 

Puppy has a new non-PAE (Slacko 5.7, I believe) that  If applicable, OP may look into.


There comes a time in the affairs of man when he must take the bull by the tail and face the situation.
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#10 buddy215

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:52 AM

Regarding email....I store and use only email online....Yahoo, Hotmail/ Outlook, Gmail. All three allow for a lot of storage...Outlook offers unlimited storage. 

Yahoo has I think one terabyte of free storage. Rather than constantly checking different email clients for mail, I simply send the main Gmail and Yahoo mail

to one Hotmail/ Outlook address. An extension in Firefox alerts me when I have mail delivered to that account....Hotmail Watcher

I really can't think of any reason to use mail app such as Thunderbird.


“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#11 cat1092

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 10:03 AM

 

I really can't think of any reason to use mail app such as Thunderbird.

Neither can I. Did try it out once, the thing is, some of us has multiple email accounts with as many brands, not all will accept Thunderbird's way of doing things (the settings). I have yet to find one that will accept all email sites. 

 

 

Quit using Yahoo due to massive spam issues, which were under control shortly after Melissa's arrival, now it's back to the same old song & dance, spam box has as much (or more) content than the inbox, of which half is also spam. With all of the threats, or rumors of, swirling today, I felt it best to dump Yahoo. The only thing in recent years it was used for, was the registration for free software, I have other accounts for this.

 

On Linux, for now, I just use the browser to get my email. That may not be practical for a business or someone who gets tons of email, but it works for the average daily user. If I were to become a full time Linux user, dumping Windows entirely, I may go in another direction.

 

There is Evolution, that I noticed as an email client on Linux Mint, but haven't used it. It may be worth a try.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 cmptrgy

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 01:11 PM

Thanks everyone again for your inputs

In summary, I plan on choosing between Lubuntu or Mint based on http://www.coolcoder.in/2014/03/3-immediate-linux-alternatives-for-xp.html information

--- It won’t be until May before I start doing so when I return from visiting family in Florida

--- I believe I’ll have a lot to learn on how the OS works but I look forward to it

--- Actually I hope I can influence some relatives & friends to consider Linux

I have a new 120GB hard drive available to replace the 30GB hard drive presently in the XP machine

--- BTW, the XP machine was given to me for free 5 years ago & it didn’t run well at all. Within 3 days, I had that computer purring like new (security, maintenance, umpteen Windows Updates not installed & I could go on & on) and it still runs like new. The only financial investment I made was to upgrade from 512MB RAM to the max 2GB RAM. So I’ve gotten the maximum usage out of the XP machine, but I look forward to moving on

--- So now the question that comes to my mind is, if I install the new 120GB hard drive, how do I do a fresh install of either the Lubuntu or Mint OS’s?



#13 rburkartjo

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 05:37 PM

yes i would do a fresh install of lubuntu 14.04 lts when it comes out of the the next release of mint it should also be an lts release. that way they will be supported for 5 years. have fun. key i just was messing around with peppermint linux. downloaded to a 32gig usb stick. put tons of extra stuff on it and have still only used less than 5gigs.


quote:He that would live in peace & at ease, Must not speak all he knows,nor judge all he sees.'

#14 cmptrgy

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 11:31 PM

The information on installing a Linux version onto USB does interest me but I guess until I do that I don't understand it yet

--- Does that mean I can use whatever Linux version I want to check out onto the USB without installing it into the computer until I am ready to do so?

--- When I visit family & friends will I be able to use the Linux USB on their computer without upsetting their computer?



#15 cat1092

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 12:23 AM

cmptrgy, the answer to your 1st question is Yes.

 

The answer to your 2nd question is Maybe. If the computer is newer, has GPT instead of MBR & especially has Secure Boot enabled, then the owner of that computer will have to make changes in the UEFI BIOS to allow it (disable Secure Boot). However, on all computers that shipped with Windows 7 & below, the answer again is Yes.

 

I highly doubt, given the popularity (or lack of) Windows 8/8.1, that all of your family & friends rushed out to buy these new computers & if so, there's a 50/50 chance they bought Windows 7 & ditched Windows 8, as did I. While the UEFI BIOS was a good idea in principle, keep in mind that it's been in the works for a long time & is NOT a MS product in itself. MS simply made whatever agreements with the founders of the UEFI, plus mandated the OEM's implement Secure Boot on all Windows 8 systems. Fortunately, most of us can disable the feature & install the OS of our choosing.

 

You'll probably be OK.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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