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Is it possible for external hard drives to fail from being too cold


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#1 bigbrown411

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 12:26 PM

Even if their in a case, is this possible?



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#2 dicke

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 12:59 PM

Hi,

I would guess that you'd have to be in something like an artic cold to get a drive to go into failure mode. None of the drives that are usually available are built to take that kind of abuse. That does not mean that you can't buy drives and systems that will function perfectly in sub zero temperatures.

Keep us posted 


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#3 OldPhil

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 03:41 PM

I think what is possible is if the drive is taken from pretty extreme cold into a warm house it can condensate, when ever I take stuff in from my truck when it is cold I wait until it does not fell cold before I fire it up.  I am pretty sure I fried a main board years back firing it off before it came to temp.


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#4 dicke

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 05:02 PM

Agreed, any rapid temperature change with electronics can be a disaster trying to happen.


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#5 OldPhil

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 05:34 PM

Put it some place warm and dry for few days you may be able to save it.


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#6 abauw

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:27 PM

arround 2003-2007 I like to put my hardrive that contain my important data on my refrigerator and it still working until now :wink:
arround 2009-2012 I usually put my hardrive on my portable freezer along with fresh fish and meat, I do that when I go to geological survey on forest and to make my hardrive have less
impact rather than i keep it on my bag :whistle:

I believe cold is good for hardrive but external case for hardrive is not good on cold temperature :P


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#7 Kilroy

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 11:39 AM

I had a user who left their laptop in their car over a cold winter night.  It would not spin up when they brought it in.  After about an hour they were able to boot the machine.  So, it looked like the drive failed initially, but after coming to room temp it was fine.

 

If it worked before it was cold bring it in from the cold, let it warm up, give it a try.



#8 smax013

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 02:45 AM

Since traditional hard drives are mechanical in nature, I have to believe that at some cold temperature it will cause metal parts to shrink enough to cause misalignment and other issues. What that temperature is, I cannot for sure, but it is likely somewhere around freezing. In nothing else, go find the specifications for your drive and see what it lists as the operating temperature. FWIW, it looks like WD lists 32 deg F (aka 0 deg C) as the bottom limit of the operating temperature and -40 deg F for non-operating temperature.

#9 TsVk!

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 04:49 AM

It rarely falls below 20c where I live...

 

Not tech related, just bragging. :orange:






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