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[Advice/Changes] A new gaming computer


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#1 Trollo

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 07:57 AM

Hello everyone :)

My current computer is pretty much the first one I ever bought - it's prebuilt, old & slow.

That is why I decided to spend a few of my saved up coins on a new one.

 

As said, I only had a prebuilt computer until now. That is the part in which I need advice - build it myself or buy a prebuilt one?

After searching the internet a little, I found that usually these prebuilt ones you can buy are worse than self-built's at a higher price.

 

I don't really have any money to waste which is why I'd wish to know:

Buy the parts and build the computer with guidance of online-tutorials or be on the pretty safe side and buy a prebuilt one - which then again has less performance?

I've been wondering about this for a while but couldn't figure out what would be best.

 

After even more internet-searches I stumbled upon the site "pcpartpicker" and put a little something together: http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Trollo/saved/48aG

 

My questions about this one: What should I change? (without making the price higher - that one I threw together pretty much hit my limit already)

Do the motherboard & processor work together? When reading through the net I found that 3rd / 4th generation parts won't work along eachother.

The motherboard & CPU there are both 4th gen. I think - couldn't find anything 100% exact on it though.

and also: Are all these parts compatible in general? I'm not too certain whether if I should blindly trust the site or not ^_^

 

Looking forward to your responses! ;)

Greetings

~Trollo


Edited by Trollo, 22 March 2014 - 08:01 AM.


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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 01:56 PM

Looks like a real nice build, as far as compatibility you need to go to the various boards for the major components to see what turns up. 


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#3 killerx525

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 06:14 PM

G'day mate, all the parts should be fully compatible although if you do not plan to overclock, you can go for the i5-4670 to cut down on cost and one more item you have missed is the operating system which will cost you about $100 for the OEM copy.


>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#4 Trollo

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 07:43 PM

Looks like a real nice build, as far as compatibility you need to go to the various boards for the major components to see what turns up.

All righty, thanks for your response :)
 

G'day mate, all the parts should be fully compatible although if you do not plan to overclock, you can go for the i5-4670 to cut down on cost and one more item you have missed is the operating system which will cost you about $100 for the OEM copy.

The i5-4760k is only 20$ more - I do, for now, not plan to overclock it but if I ever want to do it in future, that +20$ might be worth it, I guess.
Totally missed out the OS, indeed. Thanks for the note ^_^

 

Thanks for the responses.

Now there only is one pretty important question left: Should I build it myself and use a few online-tutorials as help?

I am very uncertain whether if that will be difficult if I never did it before or not.

 

~Trollo



#5 killerx525

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 08:08 PM

The video below is your holy video guide to building the system as the presenter (Linus) goes a detailed step by step process, you should start watching it from the "Preparation" chapter and if you have any other questions or run into issues, you can post in this topic and we will give u hand with it :)

 


>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#6 Trollo

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 06:15 AM

Thanks for linking that guide - I already watched it once an hour ago and it's pretty detailed, indeed. Certainly will be a challenge if building the first time...or just take ages to finish ^^

That will help me alot.


Edited by Trollo, 23 March 2014 - 06:58 AM.


#7 killerx525

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 07:50 AM

You rather take longer to build it then rushing it and screwing something up but also remember Google is also your friend too if you need quick answers to a question. 


>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#8 Trollo

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 09:01 AM

You rather take longer to build it then rushing it and screwing something up but also remember Google is also your friend too if you need quick answers to a question. 

Indeed, I'll of course be very careful and try not to break anything - wouldn't be a good idea to rush.

 

I'd have one more question though - when asking someone else for an opinion, I got the reply "you should replace that video card with a GTX 780".

As this card costs more than 700$ @ 3GB vram, I do wonder: Why is it that expensive? Is there a difference in quality or such?

 

Thanks alot for all your help until now c:


Edited by Trollo, 23 March 2014 - 09:01 AM.


#9 killerx525

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 03:09 PM

The reason behind it's high price is due to it's complete different architecture (GK110) and the performance it produces since the GTX770 is a rebranded GTX680 (GK104) making it a lower price and i suppose, the R&D cost that comes along with the GK110.  


>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#10 Trollo

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:52 AM

The reason behind it's high price is due to it's complete different architecture (GK110) and the performance it produces since the GTX770 is a rebranded GTX680 (GK104) making it a lower price and i suppose, the R&D cost that comes along with the GK110.  

All right, thanks for explaining. I couldn't get an answer on that anywhere unfortunately - not even from the people that suggested it ^^



#11 Ezzah

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 11:05 PM

Everything's fine, but your cooler. It's unnecessary to have such a powerful cooler, a EVO 212 will do just fine, unless you really want to spend the extra 50 bucks for the Noctua cooler. 


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#12 killerx525

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 11:31 PM

The reason for the all in one cooler is the possibility of overclocking in the forseeable future.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#13 Ezzah

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 04:33 AM

Perhaps. The most delicate part of the process, is placing the CPU into the socket. Be very VERY gentle. If it falls in wrong, and you try and correct it WHILST STILL IN THE SOCKET, you will destroy all the pins. Most distributors will not give you a refund for this. Don't force the CPU into the motherboard either, use two fingers and hold the CPU by the edges and gently lower it in. If it falls in wrong, don't panic, gently hold the two diagonal ends, before pulling the CPU back out for a second attempt.

 

Also, when applying thermal paste, please remember to put a small "pea" size, not the whole tube. If the thermal paste provided is conductive, most likely is from Noctua, then it can leak over the sides and short your motherboard.


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#14 Trollo

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 08:16 AM

It's likely that I will overclock my computer at some point - I'm not too sure how much it will be.

Can the EVO 212 just not take as much as the Noctua could or will that not work out at all?

 

I've been worried about the CPU placing alot...how easily does it really break?

 

//edit: Should I replace the Asus Z87-A with a ASRock Z87 Extreme4 or is the Z87-A better? Seen quite a bit of bad reputation for Asus mobo's while I mainly saw good things being said about ASRock's.

 

///edit: I was looking around a little and the "Gigabyte G1 Sniper" seems to be a little better than these - now there's the problem that there is the B5 and M5.

The B5 is an ATX, M5 is a micro ATX. I know that the difference is size - still I do have the problem that I don't know how much difference there is.

 

Will the B5 (ATX) will barely fit in / should I go for the M5 (micro ATX)?


Edited by Trollo, 28 March 2014 - 01:13 PM.


#15 Ezzah

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 07:15 PM

It's likely that I will overclock my computer at some point - I'm not too sure how much it will be.

Can the EVO 212 just not take as much as the Noctua could or will that not work out at all?

 

I've been worried about the CPU placing alot...how easily does it really break?

 

//edit: Should I replace the Asus Z87-A with a ASRock Z87 Extreme4 or is the Z87-A better? Seen quite a bit of bad reputation for Asus mobo's while I mainly saw good things being said about ASRock's.

 

///edit: I was looking around a little and the "Gigabyte G1 Sniper" seems to be a little better than these - now there's the problem that there is the B5 and M5.

The B5 is an ATX, M5 is a micro ATX. I know that the difference is size - still I do have the problem that I don't know how much difference there is.

 

Will the B5 (ATX) will barely fit in / should I go for the M5 (micro ATX)?

 

The EVO212 won't do as well as the Noctua, but with my overclock of my i5 3570k, I got to 4.6GHz no problems and idled at about 35 Degrees C. 

 

CPU placement can break the motherboard pins, if you don't do it right, like I said before. If you have a AMD chip, you will break the AMD pins, because on AMD, the pins are on the actual CPU, while for Intel, the pins are on the motherboard. So if you do end up snapping a pin on the motherboard, you would need to buy a new motherboard :/. 

 

I AsRocks are alright, but Asus motherboards are much better, keep with the Z87 Asus.

 

Get ATX, if your case is mid-tower to full tower, buying a micro atx is a very bad idea. They're for very small tiny builds, and do not boast as much performance.

 

The G1 Sniper is better than the ASRock and Z87 listed. It's up to how much you want to spend really.


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