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DVDVideosoft Free Studio hated by my AVG Resident Shield


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#1 yu gnomi

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 12:54 PM

Edit:I meant to post this in the Anti-Virus and Anti-Malware Software forum. Mods should feel free to move this to wherever it belongs.

 

I had a long post written about this yesterday that I was going to start a thread with, but this site denied me- I am guessing due to a browser setting of mine. I am out of town now, using a different computer and won't have much acces to the one that had the issue for about a week.

 

Two days ago I downloaded and installed DVDVideosoft Free Studio from their website (DVDVideosoft,com), and I had already had AVG Antivirus Free Edition 2014 runing on my computer. Everything seemed fine at first, but the next day AVG's resident shield popped up with a 'Threat Detected' warning, claiming it had located a 'potential trojan agent' and giving me the option of removing the treat or ignoring- I chose to remove.

 

I then did a full computer scan with Malwarebytes which took a couple of hours. During this scan, AVG resident shield popped up repeatedly with new detected threats, always 'potential trojan agent's, and in a different file each time. This happened about every 10 minutes, although it probably wasn't at exactly regular intervals- I didn't time them.

 

At the end of the scan, Malwarebytes had found a couple of suspicious files (OpenCandy PUP) and I set it to remove them, which prompted me to reboot- which I chose to do. After making that choice, AVG popped up with another 'threat detected' warning- but the computer was already shutting down and I never even had a chance to do anything about that one.

 

I decided that if these pop-ups continued to happen, I would uninstall Free Studio- because installing it was the only significant change I had made to my computer recently and because many (though not all) of the files that AVG resident shield was warning about were part of that installation.

 

While rebooting- after leaving the light blue introductory screen to my normal desktop view, but while services and startup programs were still loading- AVG popped up with a 'threat detected' warning again. It may have said the exact same stuff as the one I saw immediately before the reboot commenced, I don't know. I imediately uninstalled Free Studio and the problem went away and didn't return.

 

I don't know if these were all false positives from AVG or if Free Studio was actually, repeatedly attempting to install malware, or what. All I know for sure is that this particular problem (literally dozens of 'threat detected' warnings) had never happened prior to installing Free Studio, and stopped happening once I uninstalled it. That couldn't possibly just be coincidence.

 

That particular computer is now, as far as I could tell, completely malware free. It has no performance troubles, and no inexplicable wackiness beyond what I reported above - which now appears to be over.

 

My plan is to simply avoid installing that particular piece of software again and hope that nothing like this happens again. If anyone has any advice, or perhaps an explanation, I am all ears


Edited by yu gnomi, 21 March 2014 - 01:15 PM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 12:06 PM

potential trojan agent detection = Potentially Unwanted Program (PUP)

Free Studio is an all-in-one package bundling all free multimedia applications developed by DVDVideoSoft.

Free Studio (typical for freeware packages is criticized for toolbar and Web search engine installation....

About DVDVideosoft Free Studio

Many programs, toolbars and add-ons/plug-ins come bundled with other free third-party software as a common practice by legitimate vendors (and some folks actually like the bundled offers). In some cases, they may be included in Installers or Downloaders found at hosting sites such as CNET, BrotherSoft, Softonic, FreewareFiles and Tucows.

When a vendor includes an add-on such as a toolbar, they do so as a way to "pay per install" and recoup associated business costs. This practice is now the most common revenue generator for free downloads and is typically the reason for the pre-checked option. If pre-checked by default, that means you need to uncheck that option during installation if you don't want it. If you install too fast, you most likely will miss the "opt out" option and end up with software you do not want or need. The best practice is to take your time during installation of any program and read everything on the screen before clicking that "Install" or "Next" button. Even then, in some cases, this opting out does not always seem to work as intended.

Calendar Of Updates maintains a comprehensive list of common software bundled with unwanted add-ons called the:
Installers Hall of Shame.

Keep in mind that these bundled packages, installers and downloaders can often be the source of various issues and problems to include Adware, pop-up ads, browser hijacking which may change your home page and search engine, and user profile corruption. Since some of their componets and behavior are determined to be harmful, anti-virus and anti-malware tools may detect and remove them as Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs). PUPs may be defined somewhat differently by various security vendors and may or may not be detected/removed based on that definition.

More information and Best practices for downloading software can be found in this topic:
About those Toolbars and Add-ons - Potentially Unwanted Programs (PUPs) which change your browser settings

I have never condoned bundling of software but this is what we have to live with now as more and more legitimate vendors are doing this to recoup business expenses. Folks need to take some personal responsibility and educate themselves about this practice.
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#3 yu gnomi

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 11:47 PM

potential trojan agent detection = Potentially Unwanted Program (PUP)

Did not know this, it partially explains things- it doesn't really explain to me why so many different pop-ups were generated with so many different files being identified as threats. Perhaps tomorrow I will see if I can post my Resident Shield log, I will be stopping off at my house to pick up a few things.

 

It's kind of moot now, but I did uncheck all the boxes regarding installing optional software. In principle I don't have anything against software that offers extra installation options (even if default is always to allow every extra software package) as long as all of the options are legitimate software products someone might want. I understand that software developers want to monetize their product, and I don't really care for programs like Daemon Tools 'WhenUSave' which hijacks your browser and takes it to advertising sites.

 

The particular issue I had with this installation was mainly that I literally didn't know what was going on. The Resident Shield warnings happened hours after I finished installing Free Studio


Edited by yu gnomi, 25 March 2014 - 12:00 AM.


#4 quietman7

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 06:45 AM

It's kind of moot now, but I did uncheck all the boxes regarding installing optional software.

In some cases, the opting out does not always seem to work as intended.
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