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Is there ANY way to "intellectually" fence off the bad sectors part of your hd?


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#1 James T Kirk

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 01:20 AM

:bounce: HI THERE folks.
i was wondering how you are doing today?
 
i got a bit of a hardware problem here, and am not sure as to how i should proceed in this matter.
 
my hd says it has bad sectors, and i have got a couple of error messages.
is there ANY way to "intellectually" fence off the bad sectors part of your hd, so that you only use the good part?
 
 
 
 


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#2 x64

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 02:02 AM

CHKDSK /R

should do what you want.

 

But I'd be very hesitant to continue to use a hard disk which is visibly showing such problems. Hard disk drives are cheap these days, replace it whilst you still have most of your data.

 

x64



#3 James T Kirk

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 02:52 AM

:welcome: hi x64, thnk for the reply.
 
"CHKDSK /R"
that's what "I" thought.
but someone else said that CHKDSK /R doesn't fix disk errors, only the files themselves, or something like that. they said even if after CHKDSK /R /F, and 0 bad sectors showed up, that later don't be surprised if it goes south.
 
x64, what about this technique:
what you do is partition off a separate partition where the bad sectors on the hd are, and then have the rest, which is good, to use?
 
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#4 NickAu

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 04:55 AM

Please read this. .

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/458113/partitioning-around-bad-sectors/


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#5 hamluis

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 01:34 PM

There is no way to "fix" bad sectors...they are like a known pothole, you take note of them and drive around them.

 

When you format a hard drive, it takes note of bad sectors and does not include them in the partition structure.

 

The chkdsk /r tool...ATTEMPTS...to rescue data files which are on bad sectors.  It is not always able to do so.

 

What Do Bad Sectors Mean

 

Louis



#6 TsVk!

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 05:55 PM

Hi James,

 

When you start getting bad sectors it's just time to buy a new hard drive. As well as the actual failed sectors there will be many more that are ready to go, and multiplying rapidly. They are like HDD cancer. Run a scan with this utility if you want to see what I mean, it will show you the sector response times... you will see how bad it is going to get, really quickly.

:busy:



#7 James T Kirk

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 08:38 PM

howdy NickAu1, thanks for the reply,
i'm glad to see you again.
 
THANK YOU    THANK YOU       THANK YOU       THANK YOU          THANK YOU            THANK YOU
 
that completely answered ALL of my questions.
so i just wanted to say thx U!
 
:welcome: hamluis, yo, its great you made it.
how's everything?
 
now i know how to proceed in this matter.
and what to do about this problem:
 
soft error = possible fix with all '0' fills
hard error = emminate destruction, given only a matter of time. cannot be fixed. use hd as target practice
 
how's TsVk!? thx for the reply!
alright, you showed up. that's cool.
 
thanks for the link!!!
this is awesome.
i will solve this problem now, either as target practice, or a fix.
 
p.s. however, even if it is a "soft error", and i fix it, i will still mark the outside of the hd with a pen labeled: "BEWARE bad sectors in 3,2,1" :guitar:
 
so my question for everyone is that if it is a "soft error", and i do fix it, will it still be the verge of potential error at any moment, or will it then be as good as new?
[note that even new hd's shipped directly out of the factory sometimes come stock with bad sectors, right off the shelf]
 
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#8 TsVk!

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 12:01 PM

multiplying bad sectors are not "soft" errors...

 

buy a new HDD.



#9 James T Kirk

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 03:24 AM

:birthday: TsVk!, hi is you?
 
what i was saying was that, there are two types of disk errors.
 
1. one is called a soft error, or file/data error.
2. and the second is a mechanical error, or "hard error".
 
both types of errors, as there are two types, can multiply.
however, a soft error can be fix.
 
and a mechanical error can't be fixed.
 
it doesn't matter which it is because even if it is a "soft error", and i fix it, i will still mark the outside of the hd with a pen labeled: "BEWARE bad sectors in 3,2,1"
[and i will only use this hdd for target practice]
 
i am getting another hd -- i just wanted to know about hardware and what i should do in these situations, or if they could be salvaged, and how much longer that they might last.
 
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#10 TsVk!

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 03:36 AM

not my b'day... but thanks anyway.

 

Soft errors can be fixed with chkdsk, hard errors cannot be fixed.



#11 waldojim42

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 06:21 AM

Every hard drive has bad sectors. Your hard drive should intelligently mark them as bad when it finds them. If you are developing bad sectors on a relatively quick  basis, then discontinue use of that drive. If you are seeing a couple errors show up once every six months or so, then let the drive mark them as bad, and move on.


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#12 James T Kirk

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 11:24 PM

hi waldojim42, nice to be acquainted,
 
that's interesting that you mention that because so far there really hasn't been any kind of errors, other than delayed write failures and the inability to restore a clone onto the partition.
and, in the check disk test, 4 bad sectors showed up. but then i deleted the partitions, created new ones, formated the partitions, and reran the check disk test and now have no bad sectors that show up:
however, i am still unable to restore a clone to this partition.
 
do you have any ideas how to test, like a series of techniques that i could use to check whether or not that i have errors on the drive?
i can only think to copy stuff onto the partition, possibly small things, and then maybe something big, like as big as the entire partition; and then try to retreive the information or see if it will run/load.
 
:football: i looked through the list of symptons for what happens in the case of a bad hdd, and the only thing that fit was the delayed write failure.
i am using an external drive, so its possible that the connection itself could be the culprit and not some other reason.
 
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Edited by James T Kirk, 25 March 2014 - 11:25 PM.


#13 TsVk!

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 11:34 PM

I mentioned this utility...

 

It really does give you A LOT of information on a HDD.



#14 waldojim42

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 09:04 AM

 

hi waldojim42, nice to be acquainted,
 
that's interesting that you mention that because so far there really hasn't been any kind of errors, other than delayed write failures and the inability to restore a clone onto the partition.
and, in the check disk test, 4 bad sectors showed up. but then i deleted the partitions, created new ones, formated the partitions, and reran the check disk test and now have no bad sectors that show up:
however, i am still unable to restore a clone to this partition.
 
do you have any ideas how to test, like a series of techniques that i could use to check whether or not that i have errors on the drive?
i can only think to copy stuff onto the partition, possibly small things, and then maybe something big, like as big as the entire partition; and then try to retreive the information or see if it will run/load.
 
:football: i looked through the list of symptons for what happens in the case of a bad hdd, and the only thing that fit was the delayed write failure.
i am using an external drive, so its possible that the connection itself could be the culprit and not some other reason.
 
SECURITY

 

As I have mentioned elsewhere, modern drives will hide defective sectors on its own. Those bad sectors that showed up only did so because there was data there that was unrecoverable. Once the system marked those as bad, you wouldn't see them again.

 

As I mentioned, you DO have errors. ALL drives do. What you should be able to do, is see what sectors are bad, or at least how many. Using tools like Seagate Seatools, or SpinRite you can test the drive, and get the smart status.

Using HD Tune, you can see the SMART table on the drive. Importantly, you can see the number of reallocated sectors. For example, right now, my drive shows 1 reallocated sector. It is a new drive though, so I don't expect I have used the entire surface yet.

 

If you are concerned about other errors on the drive, use Seatools, and run the long generic test. Or, if you are willing to pay a few bucks, get your hands on SpinRite.


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#15 Kilroy

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 12:35 PM

I own SpinRite  Part of what it does is force bad sectors to be relocated.  Drives have "extra" space so that bad sectors can be relocated.  I really haven't used it much and am waiting for the next update which is supposed to greatly increase the speed.  The next update will be free to registered users and I plan on starting to use it for maintenance on my 30+TB worth of drives.






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