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New HP tower blue screen, then crashed.


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#1 jesseca

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 07:49 PM

I bought a new Hp tower from a local home computer business. Barely used for two weeks when I got a blue screen with an "error detected" then crashed. After starting back up in safe mode I found this message. I shut it down, contacted the guy I bought it from to take it in to be looked at. A few days after dropping it off and he tells me it is my mother board and offers an Apple tower to me for $250 so I am not out $350....Can someone please tell me how after only two weeks of using a new tower my mother board could be bad? I am baffled. I am a photographer and deal with large RAW files, but that should not have caused any problems. 

 

Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.768.3

Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: 1e
BCP1: 0000000000000000
BCP2: 0000000000000000
BCP3: 0000000000000000
BCP4: 0000000000000000
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 768_1

Files that help describe the problem:
C:\Windows\Minidump\030914-36067-01.dmp
C:\Users\HP\AppData\Local\Temp\WER-48953-0.sysdata.xml

Read our privacy statement online:
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If the online privacy statement is not available, please read our privacy statement offline:
C:\Windows\system32\en-US\erofflps.txt
http://1.2.1.0/
1.2.1.0

 

 

 



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#2 acerts04

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 08:14 PM

hello :hello: and welcome to bleeping computer! please follow the below instructions

 

Upload the actual crash dump files.
 
You will find the crash dump files inside C:\Windows\Minidump folder. To copy the dumps, disable "User Account Control" first. Otherwise you may receive a permission error. After disabling UAC, copy and zip all the dumps using 7-zip ( http://www.7-zip.org ). Either attach the zip with next reply using "More reply options --> Attach files" or use a free file hosting site.
 
For example -> http://www.mediafire.com/
 
Publish a snapshot of your system using Speccy
 
Please follow the below tutorial to know how to use "Speccy" to collect system info.
 
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/323892/publish-a-snapshot-using-speccy/
 
Don't paste the output displayed by "Speccy" here. Instead paste the web link it displays.
 
 Minitoolbox log
 
Download "Minitoolbox" from the below link.
 
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/download/minitoolbox/
 
 Run the tool and only select the following tick boxes.
 
 
List last 10 Event viewer errors
List installed program
List users, partition and memory size
List Minidumps
 
Now click "Go" and post the output displayed in next reply.


"In real life, the hardest aspect of the battle between good and evil is determining which is which."


#3 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 08:17 PM

First of all, welcome to BC !

 

 

it is my mother board and offers an Apple tower to me for $250 so I am not out $350....

 

Run this one past me again. Two weeks after you buy a new HP tower it goes faulty and your supplier offers you either a different, lesser (it would appear, certainly cheaper), computer instead of repairing or replacing your HP ?

 

I have no idea where you live, but do you not have consumer protection legislation there, or even just plain simple warranties ?  With a two week old computer, I would expect at the least to have the motherboard replaced at no cost to me, or the complete tower replaced with an identical or better one, equally at no cost to me.

 

Motherboards are obviously electronic in their nature and it is a characteristic of electronics that they suffer a relatively high failure rate early in their lives, this then falls to a typically very low rate (in normal usage) until near the end of their expected lives, when the failure rate starts to climb again. This characteristic is so well known it has a name - the bath tub curve.

 

I too handle large files, and they are not a contributory factor. You were merely unlucky in that you suffered one of the early failures.

 

Do not settle for less than complete repair or replacement.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 08:25 PM

Acerts' advice is relevant and accurate, and if your computer was 6 months or a year old I would say follow it. But it isn't - it's just over two weeks old.

 

Go back and say that you want the tower replacing with another HP one, or a new mother board fitting AT NO COST TO YOU. If your supplier won't play ball on this one, settle for nothing less than a refund of every penny, cent or lira you paid. And if he still won't play ball get advice. Do you have some form of Citizens' Advice Bureau or Town / City / State Trading Standards organisation ?

 

Anything less, you are being ripped off !

 

Chris Cosgrove



#5 jesseca

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 08:29 PM

First of all, welcome to BC !

 

 

it is my mother board and offers an Apple tower to me for $250 so I am not out $350....

 

Run this one past me again. Two weeks after you buy a new HP tower it goes faulty and your supplier offers you either a different, lesser (it would appear, certainly cheaper), computer instead of repairing or replacing your HP ?

 

I have no idea where you live, but do you not have consumer protection legislation there, or even just plain simple warranties ?  With a two week old computer, I would expect at the least to have the motherboard replaced at no cost to me, or the complete tower replaced with an identical or better one, equally at no cost to me.

 

Motherboards are obviously electronic in their nature and it is a characteristic of electronics that they suffer a relatively high failure rate early in their lives, this then falls to a typically very low rate (in normal usage) until near the end of their expected lives, when the failure rate starts to climb again. This characteristic is so well known it has a name - the bath tub curve.

 

I too handle large files, and they are not a contributory factor. You were merely unlucky in that you suffered one of the early failures.

 

Do not settle for less than complete repair or replacement.

 

Chris Cosgrove

 

 

 

Bear with me I have no clue how to reply correctly on here. The guy works out of his home along with his father. Shady I know, but as a small business owner I tend to work with other small business owners, and he obviously does not run his business well. I currently live in Georgia. 

 

I just spoke with him today about everything after him having the tower for several days. (he still has it at the moment) During our conversation it has been implied that I would be the one pay $200 for a new mother board if I decided I want him to fix it. 

Should I expect him to repair it with all costs to him or should I be the one paying for them?

 

 

These are direct quotes from the person I have been speaking to. 

 

"I am 99% sure it is the board. Getting a new one would fix it but we would only put a NEW one in it and they cost $200 alone. I do not imagine any mistakes installing it but a simple one and boom goes the dynamite"

 

 

"I am not saying that you did not cause whatever happen to happen but I do not think you did. I believe it would have happened to whoever purchased it or had we kept it for 2-3 more weeks. We/I am not going to make you eat $350. We are not going to either. Any suggestions on the best way to fix it? I do not have a tower right now but as soon as I do, I can get it to you and an insane low price. I just don't know. I honestly want to blame it on HP."

 

 

"Because of all the software, hardware, and being Apple, we were gonna sell the tower for $500. It is worth every dime. But I could charge you no more than half. I will have to check the size of the hard drive and let you know tonight or in the morning. I did not like Apple at first but after working on this tower and a Macbook 2 weeks ago, kinda like them a ton more. Always respected them but they always cost too damn much."



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 06:42 PM

 

The guy works out of his home along with his father.

 

This is not a bar to being an organised business. A friend and neighbour of mine ran a machinery agency until he retired selling equipment valued at up to £150,000 from his house. The critical distinction here is whether you bought the computer from a 'business' or from a 'private individual'. In general, legal protection is of a much lower standard for 'private' deals - where 'buyer beware' rules - than for deals with a business.

 

I am not a lawyer, and my familiarity is with consumer protection law in the UK and the EU, so I cannot advise on the detail of Georgia's business regulations, but I would have thought that replacing the tower with another HP one would be merely an administrative problem for him. He sends the faulty tower back to HP or whichever intermediary he got it from, and they send him a replacement which he passes on to you. The buck should eventually finish up with HP. Your other points :

 

"Should I expect him to repair it with all costs to him"  -  YES

"Should I be the one paying for them?"                      -  NO

 

"I am not saying that you did not cause whatever happen to happen but I do not think you did." 

 

This bit is hilarious. If you had thrown it out of an upstairs window, or spilt a bowl of soup all over the interior then nobody would expect that to be covered by any normal warranty, but you didn't. You just used it as a computer.

 

If this guy is trading as a business, and that is fairly easy to establish - adverts in the local press or on-line, mail shots, flyers and so on - then you have the full rights granted you by the State of Georgia and any applicable Federal regulations as well. Look them up in your local library, speak to Citizens Advice and to whatever organisation looks after trading standards in Georgia - here it would be my local County Council, and settle for nothing less than either a repair or replacement at no cost to you OR every cent you paid back.

 

Taking his offer of an Apple has other implications - the software you use in its Windows format will not natively work on an Apple OS. It is possible to install a Windows 'simulator' on an Apple machine but this is an extra cost and inconvenience to you.

 

If it turns out he can claim to be a 'private' individual, then you may have to settle for what you can get, but push as hard as you can.

 

Am I right in thinking that you have some form of small claims court in the US, I think we got the idea from you ?  Here you can bring actions for small amounts very cheaply, you don't even have to have a lawyer. In the final resort, I would think about this line of action.

 

As you can gather, this one has got me annoyed !  You are being ripped off, and I don't like it. I can't give practical assistance at 3000 miles or so, but if you do finish up having to bite the bullet on this one - and you shouldn't - one thing is for sure. Never buy another computer from this guy, and tell your friends that !  I have sourced quite a few computers for friends over the years, but I have never supplied them myself - I take them to my local computer and components store who I have been dealing with for over twenty years.

 

Let us know how you get on.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 OldPhil

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 07:02 PM

If it is in fact "Brand New" you next contact should be Dell direct and have them honor your warranty, I have a nagging suspicion you are dealing with a non reputable person.  I doubt the computer is brand news and you are being "Bait & Switched", they are pulling the dumb girl thing on you.  You may wish to confide in local law enforcement.


Edited by OldPhil, 19 March 2014 - 07:03 PM.

Honesty & Integrity Above All!


#8 jesseca

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 03:29 PM

I put my big girl panties on and told him I would like to have the hp fixed or replaced. He ordered a new motherboard and it should be delivered in about a week. Let's hope everything goes smoothly from now on. He portrays himself as a legal business and claims to be registered. I have a feeling he got it used and then sold it to me. We do have small claims court, but I would really like to avoid that. If things do not go well I can report him to the BBB, dispute the payment with paypal, or report him to the city for breaking several rules when it comes to operating his business. 



#9 OldPhil

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 04:19 PM

Good girl!  If you are not satisfied you can go the PayPal route,I have felling this group does biz on line and are on the scammy side.  Best of luck!

 

Phil


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#10 hamluis

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 05:18 PM

FWIW:  In the U.S...the location of a legitimate business has little to do with anything other than size, equipment required, etc.  :).  Sole proprietorships which can be run at home or other location...abound in the U.S., as do partnerships.

 

As long as you ensure that you have proper receipts for any monies rendered...and applicable documentation/warranties that prevail...you hold the correct cards.

 

Louis



#11 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 05:44 PM

Good on you Jesseca - but I still wouldn't buy another computer from this guy !

 

Hamluis - I couldn't agree more. We have hundreds of thousands of small businesses, sole traders and partnerships in the UK as well. The point I was trying to make is the difference between a private deal and a business.

 

If I sell you this computer sitting beside me, that would be a private transaction and 'buyer beware' would the the ruling guideline ( I much preferred the old Latin term 'Caveat emptor' !) because I am not putting myself forward as a dealer in 2nd hand computers

 

If I sell you a computer after putting myself forward as a dealer in computers, whether new or old, then regardless of the form of my business structure - sole trader through to listed Corporation - I am a business, and the relevant laws and regulations apply, or can be made to.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#12 hamluis

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 08:45 AM

Understood :).

 

The question in my mind which I have been trying to avoid asking...is why the OP elected to purchase a computer in the manner described, from the person described.

 

It's not really relevant but that was the question that entered my mind when I read the initial post.  The best deals on new computers are all from large enterprises which are accessible either online or in metropolitan areas (if one prefers brick-and-mortar businesses.

 

As I said, it's not really relevant to resolution of the situation presented.

 

Louis



#13 jesseca

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 10:00 AM

 

The question in my mind which I have been trying to avoid asking...is why the OP elected to purchase a computer in the manner described, from the person described.

 

 

I just moved to the area from the Midwest did an online search for computer repairs and sales since my laptop was running poorly. I ended up having him clean up my laptop and my husbands. I was pleasantly surprised by his great customer service at the time, he did everything correctly and our computers were running perfectly. So that definitely reflected on my decision to work with him again. Unfortunately with our most recent encounter it hasn't gone well. I have more than learned my lesson and next time will be going with a more reputable company.



#14 hamluis

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 11:36 AM

Not only are they "more reputable"...the fact is they are less costly and susceptible to having their images damaged by customer complaints.  That's important, IMO :).

 

Louis






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