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Ubuntu Installed. What Programs recommended?


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#1 skargas

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 07:45 AM

Hi,

I am a Newbie in Linux. i just installed Ubuntu 12 and it is working well. I obtained the Download instructions from Bleeping Computer and they were excellent!

 

Do you have recommendations as to what antivirus and antimalware programs to install? Also, what online support options are available?  I have heard of Geek Buddy.  Others out there?  HP does not help with Linux programs.   Thank you!   



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#2 myrti

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 08:05 AM

Hi skargas,

you do not really need any antivirus or antimalware programs on your linux PC as there are, for now, no viruses or malware in the wild. If you wish to install some, I would recommend you take a look at the Ubuntu Software Center. You can also take a look at the online version of the Software center here: https://apps.ubuntu.com/cat/applications/precise/software-center/
There is an open source anti virus program called Clam AV, but several other companies like Avast and Avira

Ubuntu itself has a few very large support forums and a support chat and, of course, we're here to help as well. :)

regards
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#3 jonuk76

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 01:29 PM

Some support options are here.  Ubuntu support forums are generally very good.  There is also the "Ask Ubuntu" online support system.  I don't think Canonical professional support (e.g. phone support) is really geared up for individuals though, more corporate clients.

 

There are a number of books available aimed at Ubuntu users covering basic use on to more advanced stuff.  Ultimately, much of the same information applies to other distributions, especially ones based on Ubuntu, of which there are lots..

 

This is not specifically a recommendation (my opinion is it's not required) but Comodo have a 'Windows style' real time AV scanner which I have installed for someone who really wanted a virus scanner on their Linux install.  It's free anyway, and I believe they are something to do with the Geek Buddy service.  For the computers I've set it up on it worked OK, although I read someone else mention that it can slow the system down a lot, which wasn't my experience. ClamAV is an on demand scanner, which can be used for scanning Windows partitions for issues, but it doesn't provide real time AV scanning.


Edited by jonuk76, 18 March 2014 - 01:33 PM.

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#4 NickAu

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 08:56 PM

Whats a virus. Online support, Unbuntu forums or this site are great.

I find youtube useful, juts type the question into youtube and there is usually a video tutorial on the subject.

 

 

 

Eg.

Reinstalling GRUB  Easy on the eye too LOL.

http://youtu.be/WtBBl6HvdpM



#5 rburkartjo

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 10:50 PM

open terminal  and type sudo apt-get install ufw. then after you install type sudo ufw enable.           


quote:He that would live in peace & at ease, Must not speak all he knows,nor judge all he sees.'

#6 rburkartjo

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 10:57 PM

http://itsfoss.com/things-to-do-after-installing-ubuntu-13-10/


quote:He that would live in peace & at ease, Must not speak all he knows,nor judge all he sees.'

#7 _dan

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 12:07 AM

If you're really into privacy you could install TOR browser (which you can on any operating system.) 

Linux OS's are supposed to all have something known as IP Tables pre-installed (which someone else could explain better at the moment.) You could Google "iptables gui" (stands for graphical user interface) but my guess is that probably isn't necessary for you right now. 

 

If you're interested in experimenting with different distros, you could use UNetBootin to install different linux OS's onto USB devices (CD's are too slow and noisy for me.) YUMI for linux is supposed to accomplish the same thing, but that program can't even recognize the USB drive even though my computer can. 



#8 NickAu

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 12:41 AM

 

Linux OS's are supposed to all have something known as IP Tables

Basic iptables howto

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/IptablesHowTo


Edited by NickAu1, 19 March 2014 - 12:42 AM.


#9 cat1092

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 01:53 AM

Cheese for webcam software.

rkhunter & chkrootkit for rootkit finders. ClamAV for virus scanner (yes it does find things).

chrominum (unbranded Google Chrome) for extra browser. Google Chrome Bookmarks & addons will sync.

Full Libre Office suite (scaled down one installed by default).

K3B (for creating bootable CD/DVD/Flash drives).

 

All of the above packages are available in the Software Manager.

 

On low powered systems, I highly recommend to stay away from the Comodo Linux package, ClamAV can be scheduled to run as Comodo can. Some of these computers are going to be low (2GB or less) on RAM, as well as light on CPU. Comodo will cripple these systems the same way it does on XP on the same hardware.

 

I also highly recommend that Linux users gets their software from the included Software Manager & download as little as possible from the Internet. This highly decreases the chance of infection on the Ubuntu install.

 

Avoid WINE, as it's a poor Windows lookalike. Some uses Wine as a virtual machine, it isn't that at all. It is just something that will be a pain to deal with & interfere with the Ubuntu learning experience, neither of which is needed.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#10 NickAu

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 04:08 AM

On firefox

Add Block plus

Popup Blocker

No Script are the first things I install. Wine omg dont get me started on that , If you must run windows stuff on linux use a VM with XP on it.


Edited by NickAu1, 20 March 2014 - 04:09 AM.


#11 cat1092

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 12:37 AM

+1 for NickAu1 above!

 

Those options has been a given for me since getting started on Firefox in 2009. Reason that I didn't even think of mentioning them is because of Firefox Sync, like Google Chrome sync, will import preferences over from one computer or OS to any other. NoScript is the best security addon that any browser has, and AdBlock Plus fine works with Firefox, Chrome & Opera.

 

Due to Adblock Plus capabilities, the content that you want to see loads faster, as w/out it, all content is fighting to load on the page at the same time. And on capped or metered connections (some are limited to as little as 5GB or less per month), those unwanted ads counts as data bandwidth. Often consuming more than what the user was looking for to begin with.

 

WOT is also good & works with the same browsers mentioned above. This lets users know about the ratings of sites, possibly saving their hard earned money sent to criminals on bad sites. I'm not only a WOT user, but a member also & always take the time to rate bad or questionable sites. Some are hard to spot & others are dead giveaways. Too many misspelled words on a site advertising for goods, along with too good to be true prices (especially software), as well as excessive references to being a "gold" Microsoft partner are all dead giveaways. Legit versions of XP Pro & Windows 7 Pro costs far more than $59.

 

VirtualBox is great free software to run VM's in if needed. One can always "try" Windows 7 for 30 days w/out activation, and 8.1 Enterprise for up to 90 days. A Microsoft Account, such as Hotmail/Outlook is required for 8.1 Enterprise Trial versions.

 

Ubuntu is really a great "drop in" replacement for Windows, it just takes a new way to get used to things. Like changing jobs, Just because it appears more technical (actually it is), there has to be a compromise between user friendliness & security. Ubuntu & any distros based from it, has superior inbuilt security, not too hard for new & experienced Linux users & best of all, no more MS taxes to pay. And the more you use it, the friendler it'll become. After learning the basics, you'll discover the at first glance intimidating terminal as your best friend. The terminal is the power to get things done, having total control over your computer. This takes time & after 5 years I'm still learning, but again that's the same with life in general.

 

So if you're in the market for a new computer & cannot afford the highly jacked up pricing for some Ubuntu vendors, grab a Windows computer with the hardware that meets your needs, create the recovery media & store that in a safe place. Finally backup the contents of the drive using any freely avaiable backup software (do both in the event you wish to sell/give away the computer). Then install Ubuntu & your favorite software, The 32 bit version has over 30,000 choices & the 64 bit over 50,000. Mostly free.

 

The good thing is, most all computers are now 64 bit & most has 4GB or more of RAM (many 6-8GB w/capacities of up to 32GB), Most any new computer can handle 64 bit Ubuntu fairly well.

 

We assist Ununtu users here, there is also a massive Ubuntu forum where the answer to most any question can be found. Many users who converts to Linux, regardless of distro, after gaining sufficient experience, in turn helps others, keeping the family growing & thriving, giving "newbies" priority where needed. We turn no one away, as long as the member follows simple forum rules, similar to what we all agreed to here.

 

Lastly, if the truth were known, over 85% of those who runs MS Windows doesn't "need" to, they desire to because it appears easier. Yes on the surface it is, but it's also easier for crooks to get in also, stealing your personal info & financial data. With Ubuntu & other Linux distros, this threat is greatly reduced, w/out paying yearly fees for security software to protect you.

 

A few of the greatest things in life truly are free.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#12 NickAu

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 03:06 AM

 

if the truth were known, over 85% of those who runs MS Windows doesn't "need" to,

Never have truer word's been spoken. Most people only use their Pc's to surf the net, watch movie's, Email, and maybe some documents like word, xl, etc, Well guess what you do not need a new pc for that, You do not need Xp or Win7, 8, 8.1 for that any Linux will do that better faster and its free.

 

I have just installed Unbuntu 12Lts on a 32 gig USB, As the pc has 4 gig of ram I changed the swapiness  from 60 to 10, I love it. I also installed Tilda because I love my terminal and Tilda is cool as it drops down from the top of the screen ( Looks cool). Now to set this thing up and make it sing. First thing I want is Preload.

 

 

Preload is a program written by Behdad Esfahbod which runs as a daemon and records statistics about usage of programs using Markov chains; files of more frequently-used programs are, during a computer's spare time, loaded into memory. This results in faster startup times as less data needs to be fetched from disk. preload is often paired with prelink.

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Preload

 

 Type in Terminal.

sudo apt-get install preload

Thats all you have to do.

 

 

Swappiness is a Linux kernel parameter that controls the relative weight given to swapping out runtime memory, as opposed to dropping pages from the system page cache. Swappiness can be set to values between 0 and 100 inclusive. A low value causes the kernel to avoid swapping, a higher value causes the kernel to try to use swap space. The default value is 60, and for most desktop systems, setting it to 100 may affect the overall performance, whereas setting it lower (even 0) may decrease response latency.[1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swappiness

Change Swappiness Value
1. Run terminal

2. Enter following line to see current swappiness value
cat /proc/sys/vm/swappiness
(default value in Ubuntu for swappiness is 60)

3. Open file /etc/sysctl.conf in a text editor,

 Type    gedit /etc/sysctl.conf

4. Enter the following By Copy/Paste or type ( Don't be lazy type it)
# Decrease swappiness value
vm.swappiness=10

5. Save the file and Reboot.

 

I also highly recommend that Linux users gets their software from the included Software Manager

I would say Only get stuff from software manager or thru Synaptics.

 

 

Ps.

 

The best thing about installing it on USB is that I can boot it on any PC.


Edited by NickAu1, 22 March 2014 - 03:37 AM.


#13 skargas

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 05:33 AM

Thank you for the great suggestions and advice.  I have a lot to learn about Linux.  

 

I am so glad i contacted Bleeping Computer!






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