Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Backup for dummies?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 briannab1369

briannab1369

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:04:21 AM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 05:28 PM

ok.. so when it comes to backing up my computer... I'm an idiot. I have been advised twice now that my laptop needs a clean install so I need to back up everything. I am unable to do it the way your supposed to with windows 7 bcz my laptop is so fried so what i'm wondering is... is it possible to zip up the files I would like to backup and email them to myself? I have another thread in here where I was getting excellent help  but the link he posted to show me how to backup every thing goes to a chkdisk site. and after taking a look at the size of my backup I don't have enough disks to do it anyway and no flash drive to backup to either.. any suggestions?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 TechGranny

TechGranny

  • Members
  • 9 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Georgia
  • Local time:07:21 AM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 05:54 PM

Just off the wall mind you but -- remember you only need to actually back up YOUR info and data -- not the whole operating system or installed programs.  Those will be re-installed in your "clean" install.  You WILL need to find any installation media and license keys for any additional software you have purchased/installed since you bought the laptop..... Hope this helps some......



#3 briannab1369

briannab1369
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:04:21 AM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:01 PM

yes I understand that thank you.. my personal files that need to be backed up is over 100gb tho bcz like I said i'm an idiot when it comes to backing up.



#4 TechGranny

TechGranny

  • Members
  • 9 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Georgia
  • Local time:07:21 AM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:12 PM

OMG Woman, way to go -- sounds like me though, I've had my desktop for over 10 years and it's a bear.  Let me think on this but I don't think you want to be emailing that stuff.  Have you thought about an external drive?  Know it would be dollars but shouldn't have any problems copying/moving your files there.  That would be what I would do personally -- that would also give you something to use as a backup device in the future.  What version OS are you running?  Other options would be to burn the stuff to DVD in small portions, transfer files over your home network to another machine you possibly have at home, or you might try zipping them up and uploading to your cloud drive.  Again, hope this helps.   Have you cleaned up your files and deleted anything you don't want anymore -- I have found that this saves me a ton of space when I go for backup.



#5 TechGranny

TechGranny

  • Members
  • 9 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Georgia
  • Local time:07:21 AM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 06:13 PM

Sorry, duh ... we're in a Windows 7 forum so that question was totally redundant..... my bad.



#6 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,415 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:05:21 AM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 07:18 PM

Backups are normally a considerable size, exceeding the capacity of removeable media.

 

It's up to you to determine the storage mechanism for your backups.

 

Alternatives include additional hard drives, external hard drives, online, etc.

 

Louis

 

Since it seems that you never completed the MRL topic you initiated in Dec...I go back to my assertion that backing up an infected system is not necessarily going to prove a useful action.


Edited by hamluis, 17 March 2014 - 07:26 PM.


#7 TechGranny

TechGranny

  • Members
  • 9 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Georgia
  • Local time:07:21 AM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 07:55 PM

You are so right!  Backing up an infected system only gives the culprit(s) additional ways to spread through being restored. 



#8 mattsowders1989

mattsowders1989

  • Members
  • 20 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kentucky
  • Local time:06:21 AM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 08:12 PM

my opinion would be to purchase either an external hard drive witch is relatively cheap or a large flash drive. copy all of your personal data over to the drive. if you are running an anti-virus program, you can right click on the drive its self and have it scan for infections. if it finds them, id run a second scan just in case. if your clean, then your ready to go.



#9 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,415 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:05:21 AM

Posted 18 March 2014 - 07:03 AM

my opinion would be to purchase either an external hard drive witch is relatively cheap or a large flash drive. copy all of your personal data over to the drive. if you are running an anti-virus program, you can right click on the drive its self and have it scan for infections. if it finds them, id run a second scan just in case. if your clean, then your ready to go.

 

Not sure what "personal data" is for a user of a computer system.  Many users consider everything on a system..."personal".

 

Using an AV program to remove an infection...or counting on such...is nothing but speculation that flies in the face of the evidence known.  If such naivete were true...all of us would need nothing more than an AV program to protect our systems...or remove malware.  The fact that there are extensive tools developed and used by those trained or experienced in the removal of malware...IMO, makes such a simplistic approach unsound.

 

There is no one application that is capable of removing ALL/EVERY malware item, AFAIK.  Hence, we have a variety of tools which attempt to do this job...and they are not effective against every known type of malware.  That's why, in some cases, users of infected systems are advised to just nuke the system and clean install.

 

Louis



#10 Scoop8

Scoop8

  • Members
  • 326 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dallas TX
  • Local time:05:21 AM

Posted 18 March 2014 - 08:19 AM

briannab1369

 

Hi,

 

Good advice from others here.  If it were my system, I'd purchase an external HDD since it can be used for many purposes, storing images, unattended incremental backups, etc.

 

Once you get your Laptop running with a clean install, I'd run a full-HDD Image so that you'll have a complete HDD backup ready for future rescue use.

 

My other advice would probably be seen as "overkill" by some, but I'd purchase a spare HDD for your Laptop. 

Conventional ("spinner") HDD's have become inexpensive lately and there are several reasons that it's a good investment (my opinion):

 

- You'll have a spare HDD ready if your original HDD fails or gets compromised by malicious content

 

- You can use the spare HDD to maintain a periodic cloned copy of your existing HDD.  This will provide a fast plug-play replacement for your entire HDD in the event of the above-mentioned events.  It's also a good backup for human error, ie, download gone bad, or a mistake in the Registry editor, among other possibilities.

 

- It provides a fast recovery method from virtually all malicious infections.  As hamluis mentioned,  sometimes the best way to recover from some malicious infections is to wipe the HDD.  If that's necessary, then the user has to re-install the OS, reload all programs, restore your user-specific folders, items from backups.

 

If you're maintaining a periodic clone backup or full-HDD imaging plan, you'll avoid the time-consuming task of re-installing everything on the new HDD.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users