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Stop 7b error while attempting to install XP on new hard drive


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#1 yu gnomi

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 06:37 PM

I have an old computer with an AMD sempron processor that has worked reliabily for years. However, the hard drive with the OS on it (Win XP) recently died and I a unable to boot with it. I removed that hard drive and bought a new one. I installed the new hard drive- a western digital WD800BB, and booted off of a Win XP disk in my CD/DVD drive- it entered into a windows setup screen, started loading a bunch of files from the CD, and when proceeding to the "Now starting Windows" phase of the installation, my computer crashed with an error code "Stop 0x0000007B"

 

So far I have:

entered CMOS and had BIOS auto detect my new drive- which it seems to have done;

removed the jumper from my new hard drive, since that seems to be the configuration for the lone drive on a ribbon cable;

 

after each of these changes, I re-tried installing WIN XP, with same results (same error)

 

Am I missing something obvious? I had thought this would be a fairly straightforward process.

 

Any help appreciated



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 06:47 PM

You verified that the old hard drive...had the problem?  You ran a diagnostic on it?  What happened that you determined it was the hard drive...and not another component or Windows...that was the problem?

 

Louis



#3 yu gnomi

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 07:08 PM

since it was my boot drive, and my computer wouldn't boot I was unable to run any diagnostics. I figured it was bad because of noises coming from it while attempting to boot (sounded a bit like grinding sounds).

 

edit: I remember a bit more on this- on first starting up, instead of starting up normally it went to a black screen with a white dashed line on the bottom. The white dashed line seemed to be filling in the gaps between the dashes- becoming a solid white line, from the left edge of the screen to the right, but after a few seconds the line stopped "filling." I restarted the computer and got an error message that I don't remember ("unbootable boot volume" maybe) and was prompted to CTR+ALT+DEL to restart, which I did. That took me back to the black screen with the white dashed line again, where I left it for a good half hour or so, before giving up on it ever starting up.

 

This happened Saturday, and I came to the conclusion that the hard drive was bad even though I had no diagnostics to prove it. So I ordered a new hard drive, which arrived today, and replaced the old drive with the new one, and thought I could do a fresh install of XP


Edited by yu gnomi, 13 March 2014 - 07:42 PM.


#4 yu gnomi

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 09:55 PM

The hard drive I just installed is an IDE drive. The DVD drive I'm attempting to install Win XP from is a SATA drive.

 

I found an article http://www.prime-expert.com/articles/b03/solving-bsod-issues-during-windows-xp-installation.php which seems to indicate that it could be my SATA controller attempting to operate in advanced-capability mode that is causing this crash.

 

I went into BIOS and found a setting that changes 'SATA mode' from 'RAID' to 'IDE'. I made the change (to 'IDE'), but when I restarted, the WIN XP setup program was processing so slow, I couldn't tell if it was stuck. I am also not sure if this is what is called for, or I am in danger of ruining my DVD drive or what.

 

Again, any help appreciated.


Edited by yu gnomi, 13 March 2014 - 10:02 PM.


#5 hamluis

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 08:23 AM

System manufacturer and model, please?

 

The only correlation I know of between SATA and older systems it...some motherboards did not natively support SATA hard drives and, thus, the SATA driver had to be installed as part of the Windows install...in order for the drive to be properly recognized so that the Windows install could precede.

 

Since the hard drive in question is a PATA drive, that is not a consideration.

 

What media are you using for your attempt?  What version of XP does it reflect?  Is it a retail or OEM version?  Was it furnished by the system manufacturer?

 

Why was your BIOS setting on RAID?

 

Louis



#6 yu gnomi

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 09:58 AM

This is a shop-built system with no name brand

 

The motherboard is made by MSI, but I'm afraid I don't know the exact model. The Bios is from Phoenix

 

The media I am using is a retail Windows XP disk that has been sitting around for about 10 years, but seems fine.

 

The BIOS setting was not set to RAID by me. Presumably either the people who put the system together set it that way, or that is the default setting. Until a few months ago, there were no SATA devices in this computer. The DVD drive I bought for it recently is a SATA drive (which was a mistake by me, because I then had to buy SATA cables for it) It has never had a SATA hard drive in it.



#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 10:08 AM

Did you see if there is a model number on the motherboard itself? There should be some number there, even a FCC ID number would help.

 

If you cannot get it off the motherboard, you may be able to use the HDT utility on the bootable Ultimate Boot CD

 

In order for XP to see the SATA devices at install, the chipset driver of the motherboard would have to be slipstreamed into XP using nlite.



#8 yu gnomi

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 10:18 AM

looking on net I found this article

http://www.microcenter.com/random_access/newsletters/04_newsletters/0404/in_the_lab.html

 

in the section about Windows XP setup, it mentions loading RAID drivers from a diskette during setup (press f6)

 

I do happen to have a USB 3.5" floppy drive, that is not installed on any system. Would it be possible to download the necessary RAID driver onto a floppy from a working computer, and then hook up the 3.5" drive to the system I am trying to fix and load the driver I need?

Is that likely to stop this error?

How do find the right driver?



#9 yu gnomi

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 10:29 AM

there is white check mark on the motherboard with N1996 printed next to it, so I think that is my model number

 

I didn't see your last post, while I was making my previous post

 

edit: that probably isn't my model number


Edited by yu gnomi, 14 March 2014 - 11:50 AM.


#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 10:45 AM

There are only a very few USB floppy drives that can be used during the XP install.

 

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/916196

 

I will take a look at that motherboard model number.



#11 hamluis

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 11:04 AM

 

In order for XP to see the SATA devices at install, the chipset driver of the motherboard would have to be slipstreamed into XP using nlite.

 

OP already stated that optical drive (which is SATA) works with xettings as they are...no drivers needed for XP install.  SATA optical drive is a non-factor.

 

The fact that BIOS reflects SATA setting...indicates native support for any SATA devices, IMO.

 

I would try the jumper setting for Cable Select for the hard drive...and I would reset the BIOS setting back to SATA, since IDE drives don't require a particular setting to function in a board with SATA support.

 

Motherboard Specs

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 14 March 2014 - 11:27 AM.


#12 yu gnomi

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 11:24 AM

There are only a very few USB floppy drives that can be used during the XP install.

 

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/916196

 

My floppy drive is a TEAC, at least one TEAC model is useful according to that doc, but I can't tell which model mine is. The documentation that comes with the drive states "Windows XP does not require a device driver to use the USB Floppy Disk Drive because the device driver is already installed", but I am not completely sure if that rules it in or out in terms of usefulness.



#13 yu gnomi

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 11:33 AM

I don't want to be argumentative, but I am genuinely confused. I am going to quote from one of the articles I referenced earlier, and explain why I think it is my SATA setting

 

this is from http://www.prime-expert.com/articles/b03/solving-bsod-issues-during-windows-xp-installation.php

 

3. Stop 0x0000007B (INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE): What does it mean

When Windows starts, it must load its Kernel into the memory. To do this, Windows must read the Kernel from the disk. In order to read the disk, Windows must load disk driver first. But disk driver can't be loaded before Kernel is already in the memory.

It's a kind of chicken-and-egg problem.

To solve it, Windows temporarily (only during boot time) is using different way to access the boot disk — not via usual driver, but via BIOS interface (Interrupt 13h). BIOS Interrupt 13h is slow, and incompatible with multitasking, so it is used only to read portion of the operating system from boot disk. Other disks are never read this way.

During the boot process, in order to remount boot filesystem in read/write mode, to reopen the registry in read/write mode, to load the rest of drivers, and to perform other necessary boot tasks, Windows switches from old BIOS interface for accessing the disk to native (driver) interface for accessing the disk. This switching allows disk access to be faster and more reliable, thus new way to access the disk is used until complete shutdown of the OS.

If this switching is impossible for some reason, then Windows Kernel fires error 0x0000007B (INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE).

Usual reason why this switching might be impossible is a lack of driver: disk controller driver, or maybe bus (miniport) driver. There are also situations when the driver is present but contains bugs and needs to be upgraded in order to work.

The most probable reason why you are getting error 0x0000007B (INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE) is SATA disk controller configured in AHCI mode, which is supported by BIOS interrupt 13h, but requires special driver from motherboard vendor in order to work in Windows.

 

my interpretation (or mis-interpretation) is that the DVD drive could be reading fine while XP install was in the initial set up phase of reading kernal files and drivers, but when switching to 'Starting Windows' mode and trying to use the drivers it had just read, it would crash for lack of a driver to facilitate enhanced SATA capabilities. Said driver not being needed for initial phase because of the interrupt 13h doo-hickey stuff in the article.



#14 yu gnomi

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 11:49 AM

also after looking about a bit on the net, I no longer think that I posted the proper model number for my motherboard. Apparently N1996 can be found on most or all of MSI's motherboards.

 

I hae downloaded the ultimate boot CD iso, which can be found by carefully following links from what Hamluis posted earlier (there were a number of things I almost downloaded, including an UltimateBootCD.exe (a binary file), that I am guessing I would have regretted installing). I will burn the CD and run the HDT utility to figure out which motherboard I have.



#15 yu gnomi

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 01:00 PM

my motherboard appears to be referrred to as MS-7181 by the HDT program. It is also called MSI K8MM3-V, this appears to be the manufacturer's own designation.

 

according to HDT the Bios is Phoenix Bios v 6.00PG






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