Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

OverClock


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 biferi

biferi

  • Members
  • 67 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:27 AM

Posted 10 March 2014 - 10:51 PM

I know when you Buy a Motherboard they can Run a lot of Different CPUs.

 

And every CPU will have it's own Front/Side BUS Speed.

 

So when you Buy a CPU that the Motherboard can take it still does not know what CPU you are installing.

 

I know a lot of Motherboards Auto Detect the CPU Speed but just say you have one that does not.

 

I know you eather set it in the BiOS or you set it on the Motherboard with a Jumper.

 

And yes I know you will read the Booklet for the Motherboard to see how to set it.

 

But why do they say you are Changing a Multiplyer?

 

And even if you OverClock the CPU they still say you are changing the Multiplyer what am I missing?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 Alex&Vanko

Alex&Vanko

  • Banned
  • 1,394 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:27 AM

Posted 10 March 2014 - 10:58 PM

What is your Motherboard,CPU and RAM?



#3 biferi

biferi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 67 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:27 AM

Posted 10 March 2014 - 11:32 PM

I do not have any yet I just wanted to know why they say you are setting the Multiplyer?

 

I know you are setting the speed but why do they call it a Multiplyer?



#4 Alex&Vanko

Alex&Vanko

  • Banned
  • 1,394 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:27 AM

Posted 10 March 2014 - 11:40 PM

So First Intel or AMD.Once upon a time there was Front/Side BUS Speed.I you are going to buy I can suggest you.



#5 biferi

biferi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 67 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:27 AM

Posted 10 March 2014 - 11:59 PM

Well I do know now they have HyperTransport so they give the speed in both Directions.

 

Because it is DDR Dabble Data Rate.

 

But you still set the speed and they say you are setting a Multiplyer.

 

I just never got why they say Multiplyer?



#6 Alex&Vanko

Alex&Vanko

  • Banned
  • 1,394 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:27 AM

Posted 11 March 2014 - 12:07 AM

There is no North Bridge since 2010 year I think.So no FSB no Hyper transport.



#7 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 11,745 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:08:27 PM

Posted 11 March 2014 - 12:19 AM

 

I know you are setting the speed but why do they call it a Multiplyer?

 

In computing, the clock multiplier (or CPU multiplier or bus/core ratio) measures the ratio of an internal CPU clock rate to the externally supplied clock. A CPU with a 10x multiplier will thus see 10 internal cycles (produced by PLL-based frequency multiplier circuitry) for every external clock cycle. For example, a system with an external clock of 133 MHz and a 10x clock multiplier will have an internal CPU clock of 1.33 GHz. The external address and data buses of the CPU (often collectively termed front side bus or FSB in PC contexts) also use the external clock as a fundamental timing base, however, they could also employ a (small) multiple of this base frequency (typically two or four) in order to transfer data faster.

Read more here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPU_multiplier



#8 Alex&Vanko

Alex&Vanko

  • Banned
  • 1,394 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:27 AM

Posted 11 March 2014 - 12:21 AM

Memory controller is inside the CPU.



#9 biferi

biferi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 67 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:27 AM

Posted 11 March 2014 - 09:08 AM

Yes I know the CPU takes on the job of the Northbridge now but I still thought some Motherboards had a Northbridge.

 

Thanks for the help.


Edited by hamluis, 11 March 2014 - 11:09 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users