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Sleep mode question


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#1 skypilotpete

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 09:06 PM

Can someone tell me if the hard drive is meant to power down immediately a computer is put into sleep mode via Start - Shut Down - Sleep, or is there some setting somewhere that defines how long after the sleep command the hard drive will stop spinning? All the power management settings I can find appear to control how long it takes for the computer to go to sleep automatically after no activity. They do not appear to relate to what happens when you specifically tell the computer to go into sleep mode. Or have I misunderstood this?

 

I run Windows 7 64 Home Premium, with a WDC WD5000AAKS-22TMA0 hard drive.



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#2 Datcoolguy

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 11:03 PM

Well, i'm no expert, and i don't really KNOW it, so don't take my response as correct without further checking yourself but i'd think the hardrive would power down or go into a standby mode, if powering down is not an option, as soon as it finishes going into sleep mode.

 

Why do you want to know about this? Is it just a doubt or are you running into a problem?


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#3 noknojon

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 11:05 PM

Hi -

We must assume (lack of information), that this is a laptop or similar unit ....

 

I only have 1 basic question, and that is Why do you want to use Sleep Mode, when if you want to power down, there is an OFF button that will preserve your battery for much longer ??

 

Do you know why you may want to use Sleep mode rather than turn it off and save your battery / power ??



#4 NickAu

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 11:27 PM

Because of the large power saving, most laptops automatically enter this mode when the computer is running on batteries and the lid is closed. If undesired, the behavior can be altered in the operating system settings.

 

Sleep and Resume feature saves the contents of volatile memory to hard disk before entering sleep mode

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_mode


Edited by NickAu1, 08 March 2014 - 11:29 PM.


#5 noknojon

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 11:48 PM

Agree as above.

 

But I still hit the OFF button on mine to be sure - Takes very little to start again .........



#6 Scoop8

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 09:32 AM

I use the Sleep option since I'm running unattended overnight AV scans. I'll wake up the PC with Task Manager and then the AV or MBAM will run the scans.

 

My current AV puts the PC back to sleep after the scan completes.

 

I'm also running an unattended file backup utility so the Sleep mode allows that to run vs shutting down the PC.

 

I prefer the Sleep mode since I can resume PC activities fast at wakeup vs restarting the PC.  I'm also using spinner HDD's so I'll have a slower boot time than SSD PC users.

 

I disabled "hibernate" in Powercfg to allow a faster launch into Sleep mode since I don't need to save the environment in the event of a power outage.  I always close all programs, files, before invoking Sleep.  I basically use the Sleep mode like the <win> l  option, locking the PC until I need to use it again.



#7 Datcoolguy

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 10:02 AM

Noknojon not all computers act the same, i got a netbook that takes 3 minutes to boot, and 20 seconds to wake up from sleep, i'm not sure about apps running while the PC is on sleep mode tough,


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#8 quietman7

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:20 PM

Suspend, Standby, and Sleep are really not that much different from each other. When your computer is in one of these power-saving modes, it remembers everything you are doing and quickly resumes full-power when you want to use the computer again. Essentially, the monitor turns off so the computer uses less energy but it keeps enough power to remember what your were doing. Hibernation is similar but uses the computers hard disk to store everything that was in memory so the computer can turn off completely. Standby requires that there be power to the computer because it uses RAM. Hibernate copies the RAM to the hard drive and then shuts the system off. Standby is faster to start than Hibernation but Hibernation will survive power surges which Standby won't. Hybrid sleep (primarily for desktops) puts open documents and programs in memory and on your hard disk and then enters a low-power state so you can quickly resume work when needed.

Sleep is a power-saving state that allows a computer to quickly resume full-power operation (typically within several seconds) when you want to start working again. Putting your computer into the sleep state is like pausing a DVD playerthe computer immediately stops what its doing and is ready to start again when you want to resume working.

Hibernate is a power-saving state designed primarily for laptops. While sleep puts your work and settings in memory and draws a small amount of power, hibernation puts your open documents and programs on your hard disk, and then turns off your computer. Of all the power-saving states in Windows, hibernation uses the least amount of power. On a laptop, use hibernation when you know that you won't use your laptop for an extended period and won't have an opportunity to charge the battery during that time.

Hybrid sleep is designed primarily for desktop computers. Hybrid sleep is a combination of sleep and hibernateit puts any open documents and programs in memory and on your hard disk, and then puts your computer into a low-power state so that you can quickly resume your work. That way, if a power failure occurs, Windows can restore your work from your hard disk. When hybrid sleep is turned on, putting your computer into sleep automatically puts your computer into hybrid sleep. Hybrid sleep is typically turned on by default on desktop computers.

Sleep and hibernation FAQs: Windows 7
Windows 7: Manage Power Settings

Hibernate saves an image of your desktop with all open files and documents, and then it powers down your computer. When you turn on power, your files and documents are open on your desktop exactly as you left them.

Standby reduces the power consumption of your computer by cutting power to hardware components you are not using. Standby can cut power to peripheral devices, your monitor, even your hard drive, but maintains power to your computer's memory so you don't lose your work...

Hibernate and Standby
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#9 noknojon

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 05:33 PM

 i got a netbook that takes 3 minutes to boot, and 20 seconds to wake up from sleep

By the time I hit Start and grab my coffee mine is fully running ............

 

This may be the reason that I do not need those options.



#10 Scoop8

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 06:22 PM

quietman7

 

Thanks for the info and links.  I remember reading most of those links when I was having a problem on my Laptop with the Sleep mode.  They helped me get that fixed.

 

 

I've been reading about numerous BSOD issues and problems generally related to Sleep mode, upon awakening, locking up, etc.  I've been fortunate to have only 1 infrequently intermittent issue on my Desktop PC but I haven't seen it occur in a while.  My issue is that, upon invoking sleep mode, the HDD active LED will seem to accept the sleep command, and prepare for a couple of seconds, then the HDD LED stops, no activity, but without completing the sleep mode.  After that, no keyboard response, etc.  Restarting always fixes the issue.

 

Strange symptom, but it's not been worth it to dig into the issue as it rarely occurs.  I've read where most sleep issues are related to drivers, and video drivers seem to be common with a lot of reported sleep issues.  I haven't updated the Nvidia drivers yet, that's the next thing to do, I guess.

 

 

I'm running Win 7 x64, i5-650, 8 Gb RAM, with one Seagate  1Tb spinner (OS, data on 1 HDD). 

 

My boot time after POST is usually around 40 seconds, with the Windows logo screen duration about 26-28 seconds and the "Welcome" screen about 10-15 seconds before the desktop is fully launched.

 

I checked the complete boot time with a "boot time" VBscript and it was about 80 seconds.  That's slow but after reading a related thread over at the Windows 7 forum, my time was a little above the average time for non-SSD PC's.

 

I rarely shut down the PC's so the slower boot time isn't an issue for me with my present Desktop and Laptop PC's.



#11 quietman7

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 06:45 PM

You're welcome.
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#12 clayto

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Posted 27 March 2015 - 02:35 PM

Sleep and Standby are often referred to as the same thing, but on my Tablet they behave differently.  From Standy, unlike Sleep, I cannot wake by clicking a key or moving the mouse, I have to briefly use the power button.  I dont have the Hybrid option --- I have checked with Search and it is nowhere to be found.  As I have differnent options I would like to know what the pros / cons are of Sleep versus Standby.

 

clayto






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