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Computer takes 8-10 minutes to boot, strange whirring sounds coming from hard dr


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#1 Hacked2Pieces

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 02:24 AM

Hi, so I have an HP Pavillion Elite HPE that I bought about two years ago new. For the past few months, what I assume is the hard drive has been making a strange, loud whirring noise at odd intervals (not necessarily when I'm opening programs or doing something I assume is processer intensive). I've attached a recording of it so you can get an idea, it sounds like different cycles are phasing and the tone oscillates up and down until it peters out. i've noticed my computer seems noticeably slower these days, with explorer often crashing. the most disconcerting part is that whenever i restart it actually takes about 8-10 minutes to boot back up. It gets past the Windows splash screen and just goes blank there for a long time, then shows the desktop wallpaper and hangs there for forever too. Any ideas?

here's a link to the sound: http://www56.zippyshare.com/v/75350378/file.html

 

and here's some details regarding my computer's specs

 

OS Version: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium, Service Pack 1, 64 bit
Processor: Intel® Core™ i7-2600 CPU @ 3.40GHz, Intel64 Family 6 Model 42 Stepping 7
Processor Count: 8
RAM: 10222 Mb
Graphics Card: LogMeIn Mirror Driver, 8 Mb
Hard Drives: C: Total - 1416908 MB, Free - 397613 MB; D: Total - 13787 MB, Free - 1697 MB; N: Total - 2861575 MB, Free - 576386 MB;
Motherboard: PEGATRON CORPORATION, 2AB6
Antivirus: avast! Antivirus, Updated and Enabled

 

Thanks in advance!



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#2 dls62

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 04:31 AM

Unfortunately the sound is very indistinct so I can't tell what's going on.

 

Please download and run Speccy.  Once the scan has completed:

 

  1. Click File, and then click Publish Snapshot.
  2. In the Publish Snapshot dialog box, click Yes to enable Speccy to proceed.

Speccy publishes the profile and displays a second Publish Snapshot dialog box.  Copy the URL to the clipboard, and paste it in your next post.



#3 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 07:59 PM

First of all - welcome to BC !

 

By all means go ahead and publish the Speccy report as requested by dis62, it gives a lot of information on your system which may well lead to an accurate assessment of your problem. But before you do anything else, such as running scans or repairs on your hard drive - BACK UP YOUR DATA.

 

It is always possible that this noise is not coming from the hard drive but you obviously have your doubts, and hard drives that make anything more than a barely audible 'whirr' are liable to fail at any time.

 

I appreciate you have quite a lot of data, but that is the stuff that is really valuable to you  - you cannot replace it short of re-doing the work unless you have it backed up. You may need to borrow or buy a fairly large external drive to do this, and there are a number of different ways to do it, but they will all take a fair bit of time with that much data. A very quick google says you can buy an external 2Tb drive in the UK for about £UK 75 (€90, $US 100, approx). That is a very great deal cheaper than paying a specialist to recover data off a failed drive.

 

Hardware is easy to replace; software is merely tedious to re-install; data which isn't backed up is gone.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#4 quietman7

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 09:05 PM

Hard drive noise can be an indication of a failing hard drive but not necessarily in all instances. Many drives will make humming or clicking noises during normal operation as the platter (where data is stored) spins several thousand times per minute causing the drive to vibrate. This vibration can result in a humming, rapid spinning or clicking noises which are transferred to the computer's case. Other noises such as squealing, rattling, beeping, or scraping are often caused by mechanical problems within the hard drive.

In some cases, the spinning noise can be due to loose connection screws or components too close to one another. Relocating the hard drive to an area with more space, tightening screws, installing silicone bushings under the screws and placing silicone rubber jackets over the hard drive, power supply and fans can reduce metal-to-metal contact and eliminate the vibration. In other cases, dirty components (cooling fans, power supply, CPU heat sink, etc) can causing the hard drive to work harder than normal resulting in rapidly spinning noises. For example, the fans on graphics cards spin at very high speeds and can be very loud when they become dirty. This noise can be resolved by a simple cleaning of all internal parts within the computer.

* What Are the Most Common Causes of Hard Drive Noise?
* How to Silence a Noisy Computer
* How to Quiet Your Loud Personal Computer
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#5 Hacked2Pieces

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 12:56 AM

Hi guys,
 
Thank you for all the replys!
 
For some reason it would not let me publish the speccy report (error connecting to publishing service), so i put the txt version in a pastebin instead: http://pastebin.com/NZCp3wYw
 
And now that I finally got down under my desk and opened the computer up, I'm realizing that the noise is not coming from the hard drive but rather the power box area. it's all enclosed so i can't really poke around but, now i'm thinking it's a fan or something inside there?
 
And I tend to be pretty good about backing my stuff up, but thank you for the reminder!

 

 
Ok, thanks so much so far, let me know what you think might be the issues from here :)


Edited by Hacked2Pieces, 10 March 2014 - 12:57 AM.


#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 08:26 PM

I am glad for your sake that (1) you are in the habit of doing back-ups, and (2) the problem seems to be coming from the PSU and not the HDD !

 

A faulty PSU is much easier to replace than to put a new hard drive in and then do a full re-install. Typically four screws and disconnect and reconnect all the power connections. According to the specs I have looked at, the original power supply in your computer is a Delta DPS-460DB-3 A. These appear to be fairly hard to find and may take a bit of looking for on your part, but I think it is a standard ATX form PSU in which case you can replace it with any say 500W PSU from any reputable manufacturer. For advice on makes to look for have a look at the section in BC on building computers.

 

All PSUs are sealed units but you can sometimes see enough of the fan to be able to give it a clean with a can of compressed air and a small soft brush. It is probably worth blowing out the PSU, and for that matter cleaning the rest of your system, because it is quite amazing how dust and dirt can accumulate - especially on fans and heatsinks. Dirty fans can create noise.

 

It is at least as likely that the noise is coming from the fan's bearing, in which case the only long term cure is a new PSU. Before you rush out and buy a standard ATX PSU check the specs, particularly with regard to connectors, against your original if you can't find the Delta replacement.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#7 Hacked2Pieces

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 11:40 PM

ok great, thanks chris...should be easy enough. smile.gif.pagespeed.ce.xM_f3u022S.gif

but now i'm going back to my initial question, which is why does it take so dang long to boot? i assumed it was a hd thing due to what i assumed was the drive failing, but if that's not the case then what do you think it could be? thanks in advance!
 


#8 quietman7

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 04:27 AM

Slowness, freezing, booting, and performance issues as you describe are not uncommon, especially with older computers. There are various reasons for this - i.e. disk fragmentation, disk errors, corrupt system files, too many startup programs, unnecessary services running, not enough RAM, dirty hardware components, etc. As you use your system it becomes filled with more files/programs and has a natural tendency to slow down and behave oddly so cleaning and regular maintenance is essential.

Slow Computer/Browser? Check here first; it may not be malware

One of the most common culprits is too many startup applications so be sure to read the section "Check for any unnecessary applications loading when Windows Boots".
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#9 dls62

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 05:14 AM

The only thing I can see from the Speccy snapshot is that you have a mix makes and sizes of RAM so it will be working in single-channel mode, which will degrade performance.






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