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ran checkdisk, now booting to black screen


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#1 somegirldc

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 11:09 AM

Hey there! Long time listener, first time caller! Thanks in advance for the help.

 

Yesterday my pc prompted me to reboot from a Win 7 update. I made the mistake of walking away, and on reboot, checkdisk ran. for over 300,000 files, I got the "invalid security ID. Repacing security ID with default security ID" message. Eventually it rebooted, but ever since, it only boots to a black screen. I can move the mouse, but that's about it. I get the same result booting into safe mode.

 

I never had the OS install CD, and if I ever made a recovery CD, I can't find it. I can get to where I could do a system restore, but it's telling me there's no restore points. 've read about people running a command to reset security permissions and then being able to access their computer, but I have no idea how to do that. I do have a Linux Mint on a flash drive and I'm able to successfully boot from that, but I know nothing about Linux; I can just follow directions.

 

Thanks again!



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#2 dls62

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 11:39 AM

Hi,

 

With that number of files having their security ID replaced, we need to check that the cause is not a failing hard drive.

 

Can you give me the make and model of your system and, if possible, the make and model of the hard disk?



#3 somegirldc

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 11:46 AM

Of course. The PC is an Hp Pavillion dr7, about 2 years old. Looks like the hard drive is a Seagate ST9640320AS.

It has had issues at times ith getting too warm, sometimes causing hibernation if Im not paying attention. Thats usually fine as long as Ive got it on the cooling pad and keep the pad running. Mint's diagnostics indicate everything is ok except it has failed that parameter in the past.



#4 dls62

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:07 PM

I suggest that before you do anything else you backup all your data, if you haven't already done so.

 

Then download the SeaTools for DOS ISO and burn it to a blank CD-R.

 

Boot from the CD-R and run a Long Test.  This will catch any defects on the surface of the disk.

 

Let us know the results of the test.



#5 Nostromov

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:24 PM

[..] checkdisk ran.


Bummer, Chkdsk is one program that shouldn't ever be allowed to run (for obvious reasons, meh). It's one of the first things to take care of, on a new install: remove it from Task Scheduler, set-up the couple of Registry entires so that it won't become enabled on reboot - even when the system asks for it & wants to set those flags (unable to find a good reference page, gah), kill it with fire.
 

I never had the OS install CD, and if I ever made a recovery CD, I can't find it.


Perhaps you can find your installed version as ISO download, from the Microsoft distribution @ Digital River:

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-windows_install/cannot-find-digital-river-download-site/66a8439b-0d16-4b70-92f7-1c8486a46ebf

.. and use something like the System File Checker tool.



#6 dc3

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 08:00 PM

I suggest that before you do anything else you backup all your data, if you haven't already done so.

 

Then download the SeaTools for DOS ISO and burn it to a blank CD-R.

 

Boot from the CD-R and run a Long Test.  This will catch any defects on the surface of the disk.

 

Let us know the results of the test.

 

Running the long test invokes repairs.  This can cause loss of data.  I would run the short test to see what the condition of the hdd is.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#7 dc3

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 08:06 PM

Instructions for a Windows 7 Repair installation.
 
A Windows 7 Repair Installation will require a installation disc.
 
If you do not have a Windows 7 installation disc you can download a free legal ISO image of Windows 7 SP1 at  Windows 7 Forums.  You will need to download the same version of Windows 7 that you have installed,  This image is hosted by the Digital River store which is an official distribution partner of Microsoft.  This is a genuine untouched image which is safe to download. 
 
 
Attention:  If you do have a Windows installation disc, skip Part A and go to Part B, Step 1b.
 
 
Part A, Steps 1a - 6a
 
The ISO image will need to be burned to a DVD in order to create a bootable installation disc.
 
1a)  To burn a ISO file to a DVD please download ImgBurn and install it.
 
2a)  Insert a blank DVD into your CD/DVD drive tray, and then close the tray.
 
3a)  Open ImgBurn, and click on Write image file to disc.
 
ImgBurn1_zps715cb1c2.png
 
4a)  Click on the Browse for a file icon:
 
ImgBurn2_zpsaea72ba9.png
 
5a)  Locate the ISO file you want to burn, and click on the Open button.
 
6a)  Click on the blue arrow to start burning the bootable DVD.
 
imageburn11_zpse44f577b.png
 
 
Please note:  In order to boot from this DVD you may need to change the boot order in the BIOS so that the CD/DVD-ROM is the first device in the boot order, and the hdd is the second device.
 
 
Part B, Steps 1b - 10b
 
1b)  Place the installation disc in the tray of the CD/DVD drive, close the tray and restart the computer.
 
2b)  You will be prompted to press any key to start the installation, I find the space bar handy.
 
At this point the setup process will load files, this will take several minutes.
 
3b)  You will now need to choose the  Language, Time, currency format, and Keyboard or input method that you'd like to use.
 
After this is done click on Next.
 
w71_zps6dbda47e.png
 
4b)  Click on the Repair your computer link at the bottom-left of the Install Windows window.
 
This link will begin the Windows 7 System Recovery Options.
 
w72_zps2a656a0c.png
 
5b)  System Recovery Options will now search your hard drive(s) for any Windows 7 installations.  This will take several minutes.
 
No participation is required on your part at this time, wait till it has finished and the next window opens.
 
w73_zpsd5483f05.png
 
6b)  Choose the Windows 7 installation that you'd like to perform the Startup Repair on, then click on Next
 
w74_zps490f9a17.png
 
7b)  Click on the Command Prompt link from list of recovery tools in System Recovery Options.
 
w75_zps9941e858.png
 
when the Command Prompt opens type in sfc /scannow and press Enter.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 somegirldc

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 11:54 AM


I suggest that before you do anything else you backup all your data, if you haven't already done so.
 
Then download the SeaTools for DOS ISO and burn it to a blank CD-R.
 
Boot from the CD-R and run a Long Test.  This will catch any defects on the surface of the disk.
 
Let us know the results of the test.

 
Running the long test invokes repairs.  This can cause loss of data.  I would run the short test to see what the condition of the hdd is.


can I run the short test followed by the long test? This is before the repair cd I presume

#9 dc3

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 12:08 PM

I would just run the short test and post the results.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 somegirldc

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 05:09 PM

Short test reults - DST completed without error, short DST passed (2 min 29 seconds, if it matters)

Downloading the windows ISO as we speak



#11 somegirldc

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 07:38 PM

everytime I run the sfc /scannow, I get "there is a system repair pending which requires reboot to complete. restart windows and run sfc again". Restart, rinse, repeat, doesn't change



#12 dls62

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 06:18 AM

When the system has been started from an installation disc the command you need to enter at the Command Prompt is:

 

sfc /scannow /offbootdir=X:\ /offwindir=X:\Windows

 

X needs to changed to the drive letter displayed in the System Recovery Options dialog as at Item 6b of Part B above.



#13 somegirldc

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 09:01 AM

Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations.

 

I don't know if this actually tells you anything, but if I go to Gparted in Mint, the partition for the part of my hard drive that ISNT system/recovery/hp tools is flagged and mentions 350 clusters referenced multiplle times and a couple corrupt inodes. It suggests "NTSF is inconsistent. Run chkdsk /f on Windows then reboot it TWICE! The useage of the /f parameter is very IMPORTANT!". The drive I'm scanning that Windows is finding is D.



#14 dls62

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 09:12 AM

Start your system from the Windows Installation disc as before and once you are at the Command Prompt enter chkdsk d: /f and let it run.



#15 dc3

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 10:59 AM

Run chkdsk /r, the /r switch does the same thing as the /f but it also looks for bad sectors and will recover readable information.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





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