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boost utility from boostbyreason.com


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#1 Clovis_Sangrail

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 11:30 AM

This utility really does speed up my Windows XP machine, best as I can tell.

 

I've  had MS Security Essentials and Spybot Search-and-Destroy on my computer for a long time, and neither of them complains about the presence of boost.

 

I almost gave up on installing it, because the download and installation process was full of attempts to get me to download other crap, install toolbars, games, pick a new default search provider, all that garbage.

 

Google results include instructions on how to remove it, but I did not see anything explicitly labeling it as malware of any kind. Does anyone here have any further knowledge of it, any good or bad experiences with it?

 



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#2 Animal

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:35 PM

BleepingComputer's Official Position On Registry Cleaners and Optimizers

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.

Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.

Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.

Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.

The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.

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#3 Clovis_Sangrail

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 04:19 PM

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:
 

 

You imply  but do not explicitly state that boost is a "registry cleaner/optimizer". Do you know this to be the case?

 

The diagnostic messages I get when boost is set in "power user" mode suggest that boost stops/suspends various processes and services, "tunes" others, and removes temp files. Over several days use of it I see it affect the same programs/processes multiple times, so I assume that nothing permanent was done to them and/or their registry entries. It does not even seem to remove programs from start-up that I can tell, it just stops/deactivates some when run.

 

I don't know what "tuning" means, maybe that implies messing with the registry? I hoped that it had something to do with limiting CPU usage of processes.

 

You've inspired me to look thru the boostbyreason.com website.  The boost people seem to share your dim view of registry cleaners and registry cleaning. At:

 

http://boostbyreason.com/support-faq-19-is-boost-just-another-registry-cleaner.aspx

 

They say (amidst a bunch of other marketing-speak):

 

"... While in the past some registry errors could lead to annoying pop-ups or various stability issues, Microsoft has done a superb job in auto-correcting this for you without the need to manually make any registry "fixes". Boost on the other hand does not clean your registry (Boost will auto-fix some invalid registry entries however), instead Boost attacks your PC's performance problems <yadda> <yadda> ..."

 

Now, I'm not an advocate for nor an employee of Boost, beyond noting that it seems to have helped my elderly XP system over the last couple of weeks. The above is the boost people bragging about their product. Again, apparently some people think ill enough of it to have published removal instructions. But it seems to do other things more than attempt to clean the registry.

 

Does Windows have any facility for controlling/limiting resource consumption on a per-process basis, like 'nice' in Unix and the more Sophisticated resource management facilities in Solaris, AIX, etc? The Boost marketing-speak is the first I've ever heard of such a thing existing in Microsoft Land.


Edited by Clovis_Sangrail, 28 February 2014 - 04:51 PM.


#4 chrisd87

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 04:23 PM


I don't know what "tuning" means

You don't know what it means, but yet you download a program that tunes your computer by disabling certain services and processes...

 

IMO, your asking for trouble if you simply download programs all because you think they will help without actually knowing what they do...

 

Kind of like driving a car for the first time without taking the drivers ed course...


Edited by chrisd87, 28 February 2014 - 04:24 PM.

"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#5 Animal

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 10:38 PM

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:

 
You imply  but do not explicitly state that boost is a "registry cleaner/optimizer". Do you know this to be the case?


I do know it to be considered an optimizer. More than one site lists it in their optimization section.

See the following example for one: http://download.cnet.com/Boost/3000-18512_4-75794586.html

Not to mention the market speak is pure optimizer jargon. In my opinion, by it's very definition the name of it says optimizer, 'Boost Utility'.

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#6 md2lgyk

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 04:13 PM

I know nothing about Boost.  However, seeing that you're still using SpyBot (great in the 1990s, not any more)  and downloading from CNET (known to package malicious things in their downloads), you're a bit behind the curve on things computer.  



#7 liquidsolstice

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 04:59 PM

Eh. XP definitely had margin for tweaking for the sake of performance, but please; programs with the name "Boost", "Optimize" "Pro" (even when they don't cost anything) or have a year number in their name are usually snake-oil at best and utterly harmful at worst. 



#8 Clovis_Sangrail

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 10:32 PM

I have some conception of per-process tuning in unix/linux, less so in windows, hence my asking. I consider stopping/deactiviating services and processes to be legitimate, many sources list unnecessary ones that run by default in XP. 

 

I read the CNET review posted by Animal. One thing it says is that the 'free' part is only a 7-day trial. I've had it longer than that; and it hasn't asked me for any money yet. If/when it does, it's gone.

 

I see that PC Mag does not like SpyBot;  http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2400356,00.asp .  Maybe I'll try another. 



#9 jhayz

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 02:28 AM

Check this Bleeping Computer link prepared and posted by GM quietman7.


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#10 Clovis_Sangrail

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 09:46 AM

Check this Bleeping Computer link prepared and posted by GM quietman7.

 

Thanks, this looks like it has alot of good info in it. Will dig in to it more after work






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